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Schedules

The following are TENTATIVE course schedules for enrollment purpose only. The schedules are updated in real time: please check this page for updates with reference to additional sections, full courses, etc.

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Agricultural Economics
WED 2:00 PM-4:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Course code: AGR 210 T
Campus: Tuscania
Department: Agricultural Studies and Technologies
Credits: 3
Premises: Largo della Rocca 7
Marist Code/Title: ECON 209 L Agricultural Econ
Hours: 45
Room: Beatrice
Description: The course is intended as an introduction to basic economics concepts which frames the agricultural sector within a theoretical framework. The very first part is basically an overview of the economic principles for consumer and producer behavior, price determination, elasticity, profit, demand and supply. These concepts are then applied to agriculture: definition of agriculture and introduction to it as a business; agri-food marketing principles; leading concepts of economics of natural resources. In the last part the course treats the economic, social and environmental roles of agriculture in relation to the challenges of food security and climate change: why should we care, and how? The course concludes with a comparative analysis of the very different roles of government in agricultural policy, in Europe and other regions.
Organic Agriculture
THU 11:00 AM-1:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Notes: lab fee and/or material costs apply
Course code: AGR 220 T
Campus: Tuscania
Department: Agricultural Studies and Technologies
Credits: 3
Premises: Largo della Rocca 7
Marist Code/Title: AGR 230 L Organic Agriculture
Hours: 45
Room: Tymicha
Description: Organic agriculture of plant products is a method of production that aims to obtain quality food products while respecting the environment of the production process. This means coordinating the elements used in farming and ensuring the “renaturalization” of an environment compromised by intensive agriculture. Managing a farm that uses the organic agriculture philosophy entails using new operational techniques that permit productivity and quality, while respecting the constraints imposed by legislation, and at the same time optimizing business profitability. In the transition from traditional to organic farming it is important to choose techniques as well as a variety of products that generate the best results in that particular environment. True organic agriculture is not only a question of business management but it also requires knowledge of agronomy and an understanding of the system’s methodology and history as well as its cultural aspect, i.e., the social, intellectual, and ethical values of this system. The course includes experiential learning with seasonal activities at a local farm and facilities, horticultural cultivation in Spring and olive harvest and pressing in Fall. The course meets for 45 hours in Fall and 90 hours in Spring.
Organic Agriculture
TUE 11:00 AM-2:40 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Notes: lab fee and material costs apply
Course code: AGR 220 T
Campus: Tuscania
Department: Agricultural Studies and Technologies
Credits: 3
Premises: Largo della Rocca 7
Marist Code/Title: AGR 230 L Organic Agriculture
Hours: 60
Room: Beatrice
Description: Organic agriculture of plant products is a method of production that aims to obtain quality food products while respecting the environment of the production process. This means coordinating the elements used in farming and ensuring the “renaturalization” of an environment compromised by intensive agriculture. Managing a farm that uses the organic agriculture philosophy entails using new operational techniques that permit productivity and quality, while respecting the constraints imposed by legislation, and at the same time optimizing business profitability. In the transition from traditional to organic farming it is important to choose techniques as well as a variety of products that generate the best results in that particular environment. True organic agriculture is not only a question of business management but it also requires knowledge of agronomy and an understanding of the system’s methodology and history as well as its cultural aspect, i.e., the social, intellectual, and ethical values of this system. The course includes experiential learning with seasonal activities at a local farm and facilities, horticultural cultivation in Spring and olive harvest and pressing in Fall. The course meets for 45 hours in Fall, 60 hours in Summer and 90 hours in Spring.
Organic Agriculture
MON to THU 9:00 AM-12:40 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Notes: lab fee and/or material costs apply
Course code: AGR 220 T
Campus: Tuscania
Department: Agricultural Studies and Technologies
Credits: 3
Premises: Largo della Rocca 7
Marist Code/Title: AGR 230 L Organic Agriculture
Hours: 64
Room: Beatrice
Description: Organic agriculture of plant products is a method of production that aims to obtain quality food products while respecting the environment of the production process. This means coordinating the elements used in farming and ensuring the “renaturalization” of an environment compromised by intensive agriculture. Managing a farm that uses the organic agriculture philosophy entails using new operational techniques that permit productivity and quality, while respecting the constraints imposed by legislation, and at the same time optimizing business profitability. In the transition from traditional to organic farming it is important to choose techniques as well as a variety of products that generate the best results in that particular environment. True organic agriculture is not only a question of business management but it also requires knowledge of agronomy and an understanding of the system’s methodology and history as well as its cultural aspect, i.e., the social, intellectual, and ethical values of this system. The course includes experiential learning with seasonal activities at a local farm and facilities, horticultural cultivation in Spring and olive harvest and pressing in Fall. The course meets for 45 hours in Fall and 90 hours in Spring.
Archaeology Workshop
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES; lab fee required
Course code: ANC 193 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Via del Melarancio, 6/R
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 120L Introduction to Archeology
Hours: 45
Room: Archaeology Lab
Dual Listing: ANT 193 F RES 193 F
Description: This course combines an introduction to archaeology with hands-on work on 2500-year-old archaeological artefacts in LdM's Archaeology Lab. These artefacts have recently been unearthed in Central Italy at the Hellenistic necropolis of Bosco della Riserva, near Tuscania, where an excavation project is being conducted by CAMNES and LdM. Students will learn what happens to the finds once they leave their recovery contexts and arrive in Florence: here, under the guidance of the instructors, students will be involved in the fundamental activities of restoration, conservation, documentation, study, and storage of the finds. Students will also have the opportunity to sign up for the summer field school in Tuscania which operates directly at one of the archaeological sites.
Archaeology Workshop
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES; lab fee required
Course code: ANC 193 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Via del Melarancio, 6/R
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 120L Introduction to Archeology
Hours: 45
Room: Archaeology Lab
Dual Listing: ANT 193 F RES 193 F
Description: This course combines an introduction to archaeology with hands-on work on 2500-year-old archaeological artefacts in LdM's Archaeology Lab. These artefacts have recently been unearthed in Central Italy at the Hellenistic necropolis of Bosco della Riserva, near Tuscania, where an excavation project is being conducted by CAMNES and LdM. Students will learn what happens to the finds once they leave their recovery contexts and arrive in Florence: here, under the guidance of the instructors, students will be involved in the fundamental activities of restoration, conservation, documentation, study, and storage of the finds. Students will also have the opportunity to sign up for the summer field school in Tuscania which operates directly at one of the archaeological sites.
Ancient Rome
THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 200 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: HIST 247 L Ancient Rome
Hours: 45
Room: Caravaggio
Dual Listing: HIS 200 F
Description: This course offers a general though comprehensive introduction and overview of the 14-century lasting civilization of Ancient Rome, from its origins as a monarchy to the "Fall of Rome" and the beginning of the Middle Ages. Alongside the study of main historical events, a series of themes and issues will be explored: the range of primary sources available for ancient history; the political organization of the Roman state; the territorial expansion and its influence on the cultural and administrative sphere; Roman religion and the spread of Christianity; the end of the Roman world and the birth of a new society; the historiographical "myth of Rome." In order to stimulate students’ critical skills in observing historical phenomena, a problem-oriented approach will be supported by readings of primary sources.
Ancient Rome
THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 200 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: HIST 247 L Ancient Rome
Hours: 45
Room: Marco Polo
Dual Listing: HIS 200 F
Description: This course offers a general though comprehensive introduction and overview of the 14-century lasting civilization of Ancient Rome, from its origins as a monarchy to the "Fall of Rome" and the beginning of the Middle Ages. Alongside the study of main historical events, a series of themes and issues will be explored: the range of primary sources available for ancient history; the political organization of the Roman state; the territorial expansion and its influence on the cultural and administrative sphere; Roman religion and the spread of Christianity; the end of the Roman world and the birth of a new society; the historiographical "myth of Rome." In order to stimulate students’ critical skills in observing historical phenomena, a problem-oriented approach will be supported by readings of primary sources.
Ancient Rome
MON to THU 4:15 PM-6:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 200 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: HIST 247 L Ancient Rome
Hours: 45
Room: Tiziano
Dual Listing: HIS 200 F
Description: This course offers a general though comprehensive introduction and overview of the 14-century lasting civilization of Ancient Rome, from its origins as a monarchy to the "Fall of Rome" and the beginning of the Middle Ages. Alongside the study of main historical events, a series of themes and issues will be explored: the range of primary sources available for ancient history; the political organization of the Roman state; the territorial expansion and its influence on the cultural and administrative sphere; Roman religion and the spread of Christianity; the end of the Roman world and the birth of a new society; the historiographical "myth of Rome." In order to stimulate students’ critical skills in observing historical phenomena, a problem-oriented approach will be supported by readings of primary sources.
Ancient Rome
MON to THU 4:15 PM-6:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 200 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: HIST 247 L: Ancient Rome
Hours: 45
Room: Caravaggio
Dual Listing: HIS 200 F
Description: This course offers a general though comprehensive introduction and overview of the 14-century lasting civilization of Ancient Rome, from its origins as a monarchy to the "Fall of Rome" and the beginning of the Middle Ages. Alongside the study of main historical events, a series of themes and issues will be explored: the range of primary sources available for ancient history; the political organization of the Roman state; the territorial expansion and its influence on the cultural and administrative sphere; Roman religion and the spread of Christianity; the end of the Roman world and the birth of a new society; the historiographical "myth of Rome." In order to stimulate students’ critical skills in observing historical phenomena, a problem-oriented approach will be supported by readings of primary sources.
Ancient Rome
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 200 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: HIST 247L Ancient Rome
Hours: 45
Room: Augusto
Dual Listing: HIS 200 R
Description: This course offers a general though comprehensive introduction and overview of the 14-century lasting civilization of Ancient Rome, from its origins as a monarchy to the "Fall of Rome" and the beginning of the Middle Ages. Alongside the study of main historical events, a series of themes and issues will be explored: the range of primary sources available for ancient history; the political organization of the Roman state; the territorial expansion and its influence on the cultural and administrative sphere; Roman religion and the spread of Christianity; the end of the Roman world and the birth of a new society; the historiographical "myth of Rome." In order to stimulate students’ critical skills in observing historical phenomena, a problem-oriented approach will be supported by readings of primary sources.
Ancient Rome
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 200 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: HIST 247 L Ancient Rome
Hours: 45
Room: Augusto
Dual Listing: HIS 200 R
Description: This course offers a general though comprehensive introduction and overview of the 14-century lasting civilization of Ancient Rome, from its origins as a monarchy to the "Fall of Rome" and the beginning of the Middle Ages. Alongside the study of main historical events, a series of themes and issues will be explored: the range of primary sources available for ancient history; the political organization of the Roman state; the territorial expansion and its influence on the cultural and administrative sphere; Roman religion and the spread of Christianity; the end of the Roman world and the birth of a new society; the historiographical "myth of Rome." In order to stimulate students’ critical skills in observing historical phenomena, a problem-oriented approach will be supported by readings of primary sources.
Ancient Rome
MON to THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 200 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: HIST 247L Ancient Rome
Hours: 48
Room: Augusto
Dual Listing: HIS 200 R
Description: This course offers a general though comprehensive introduction and overview of the 14-century lasting civilization of Ancient Rome, from its origins as a monarchy to the "Fall of Rome" and the beginning of the Middle Ages. Alongside the study of main historical events, a series of themes and issues will be explored: the range of primary sources available for ancient history; the political organization of the Roman state; the territorial expansion and its influence on the cultural and administrative sphere; Roman religion and the spread of Christianity; the end of the Roman world and the birth of a new society; the historiographical "myth of Rome." In order to stimulate students’ critical skills in observing historical phenomena, a problem-oriented approach will be supported by readings of primary sources.
Underground Rome: The Christian Catacombs
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 205 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 120L Intro to Archeology
Hours: 45
Room: Augusto
Description: The course aims to study and explore the darkest and deepest places beneath the city of Rome: There the still-extant underground web of galleries, shrines and basilicas built during the Early Christian and Early Medieval centuries (c.150-900 CE). Thanks to a number of lectures and onsite classes, students will be able to understand the birth and affirmation of the Christian religion in the capital city of the pagan Roman Empire. The study of archaeological methods and material culture is an essential part of the course, which includes class visits to selected catacombs and related sites.
Underground Rome: The Christian Catacombs
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 205 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 120 L Intro to Archaeology
Hours: 45
Room: Augusto
Description: The course aims to study and explore the darkest and deepest places beneath the city of Rome: There the still-extant underground web of galleries, shrines and basilicas built during the Early Christian and Early Medieval centuries (c.150-900 CE). Thanks to a number of lectures and onsite classes, students will be able to understand the birth and affirmation of the Christian religion in the capital city of the pagan Roman Empire. The study of archaeological methods and material culture is an essential part of the course, which includes class visits to selected catacombs and related sites.
Underground Rome: The Christian Catacombs
MON to THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 205 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 120 L Intro to Archaeology
Hours: 45
Room: Tito
Description: The course aims to study and explore the darkest and deepest places beneath the city of Rome: There the still-extant underground web of galleries, shrines and basilicas built during the Early Christian and Early Medieval centuries (c.150-900 CE). Thanks to a number of lectures and onsite classes, students will be able to understand the birth and affirmation of the Christian religion in the capital city of the pagan Roman Empire. The study of archaeological methods and material culture is an essential part of the course, which includes class visits to selected catacombs and related sites.
The Roman Civilization through Its Monuments
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Notes: In collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 207 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title:
Hours: 45
Room: Traiano
Dual Listing: HIS 207 R
Description: This course investigates the history of ancient Rome primarily through its monuments — its architecture and urban form. We will consider the mythology of Rome as caput mundi ("the head of the world"), as well as the physical city and its infrastructures in antiquity, from the 8th century BCE to the 5th century CE. Significant architectural examples and monuments will be studied in their original historical, social, and cultural context. The ways in which power was expressed symbolically through building projects and artwork will be addressed during class, which will be held mostly on site in the city and its environs. Key archaeological sites and museums in and around the city of Rome will also form part of the program.
The Roman Civilization through Its Monuments
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Notes: In collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 207 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: ARCH 150 /ART 208 L Roman Civilization through its Monuments
Hours: 45
Room: Tito
Dual Listing: HIS 207 R
Description: This course investigates the history of ancient Rome primarily through its monuments — its architecture and urban form. We will consider the mythology of Rome as caput mundi ("the head of the world"), as well as the physical city and its infrastructures in antiquity, from the 8th century BCE to the 5th century CE. Significant architectural examples and monuments will be studied in their original historical, social, and cultural context. The ways in which power was expressed symbolically through building projects and artwork will be addressed during class, which will be held mostly on site in the city and its environs. Key archaeological sites and museums in and around the city of Rome will also form part of the program.
Florentia: The Ancient Roots of Florence
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 215 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: HST 233 L Florentia: The Ancient Roots of Florence
Hours: 45
Room: Galileo
Dual Listing: HIS 215 F
Description: This course analyzes the ancient past of Florence from its origins to the end of the Roman Empire. A few aspects concerning the Barbarian rulers will also be considered. The ancient town of Florentia will be discovered during each lesson through a variety of sources: written texts from ancient and medieval authors, archaeological evidence, past excavations and recent discoveries, artifacts and items housed in local museums as well as objects unearthed in recent years. Emphasis will be placed on the urban pattern by tracing and locating the main temples and sacred spaces, public buildings and private houses. Beyond acquiring a basic chronology and a timeline, students will closely examine selected topics about Roman civilization, art and architecture, lifestyle and customs. To better understand certain themes, a number of visits and field trips are planned, including to the National Archaeological Museum of Florence and little-known archaeological areas.
Florentia: The Ancient Roots of Florence
MON to FRI 2:00 PM-4:45 PM
Section: 401
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 215 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: HST 233 L Florentia: The Ancient Roots of Florence
Hours: 42
Room: Donatello
Dual Listing: HIS 215 F
Description: This course analyzes the ancient past of Florence from its origins to the end of the Roman Empire. A few aspects concerning the Barbarian rulers will also be considered. The ancient town of Florentia will be discovered during each lesson through a variety of sources: written texts from ancient and medieval authors, archaeological evidence, past excavations and recent discoveries, artifacts and items housed in local museums as well as objects unearthed in recent years. Emphasis will be placed on the urban pattern by tracing and locating the main temples and sacred spaces, public buildings and private houses. Beyond acquiring a basic chronology and a timeline, students will closely examine selected topics about Roman civilization, art and architecture, lifestyle and customs. To better understand certain themes, a number of visits and field trips are planned, including to the National Archaeological Museum of Florence and little-known archaeological areas.
Florentia: The Ancient Roots of Florence
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 215 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: HST 233 L Florentia: The Ancient Roots of Florence
Hours: 45
Room: Marconi
Dual Listing: HIS 215 F
Description: This course analyzes the ancient past of Florence from its origins to the end of the Roman Empire. A few aspects concerning the Barbarian rulers will also be considered. The ancient town of Florentia will be discovered during each lesson through a variety of sources: written texts from ancient and medieval authors, archaeological evidence, past excavations and recent discoveries, artifacts and items housed in local museums as well as objects unearthed in recent years. Emphasis will be placed on the urban pattern by tracing and locating the main temples and sacred spaces, public buildings and private houses. Beyond acquiring a basic chronology and a timeline, students will closely examine selected topics about Roman civilization, art and architecture, lifestyle and customs. To better understand certain themes, a number of visits and field trips are planned, including to the National Archaeological Museum of Florence and little-known archaeological areas.
Florentia: The Ancient Roots of Florence
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 215 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: HST 233 L Florentia: The Ancient Roots of Florence
Hours: 45
Room: Tiziano
Dual Listing: HIS 215 F
Description: This course analyzes the ancient past of Florence from its origins to the end of the Roman Empire. A few aspects concerning the Barbarian rulers will also be considered. The ancient town of Florentia will be discovered during each lesson through a variety of sources: written texts from ancient and medieval authors, archaeological evidence, past excavations and recent discoveries, artifacts and items housed in local museums as well as objects unearthed in recent years. Emphasis will be placed on the urban pattern by tracing and locating the main temples and sacred spaces, public buildings and private houses. Beyond acquiring a basic chronology and a timeline, students will closely examine selected topics about Roman civilization, art and architecture, lifestyle and customs. To better understand certain themes, a number of visits and field trips are planned, including to the National Archaeological Museum of Florence and little-known archaeological areas.
Greek and Roman Mythology
WED 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 216 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: ENG 360 L Ancient Greek Literature
Hours: 45
Room: Marco Polo
Description: The traditional stories about the Greek and Roman gods and heroes have always been a fundamental part of Western Art and literature especially since their “rediscovery” by Renaissance humanism. The major divinities of Greek and Roman religion are examined in their historical and archaeological context, focusing on the influence that Greek myths had on the Roman world. The Iliad, The Odyssey, and Roman foundations myths and sagas will be discussed with particular emphasis on the relationship between myth and history. Visit to the National Archaeological Museum of Florence will reinforce the topics treated in class. The pictorial narratives, so common in Greek and Roman monuments and objects, will introduce the sophisticated visual language created by the Greeks to tell such elaborate tales; the visit to the Uffizi Gallery will show the students how Renaissance artists revived the Greek and Roman tradition. To know Roman mythology is to understand the real essence of the ideals and aspirations of the great Roman Empire, while in the study of Greek mythology lies the roots of modern psychology.
Greek and Roman Mythology
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 216 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: ENG 360 L Ancient Greek Literature
Hours: 45
Room: Marconi
Description: The traditional stories about the Greek and Roman gods and heroes have always been a fundamental part of Western Art and literature especially since their “rediscovery” by Renaissance humanism. The major divinities of Greek and Roman religion are examined in their historical and archaeological context, focusing on the influence that Greek myths had on the Roman world. The Iliad, The Odyssey, and Roman foundations myths and sagas will be discussed with particular emphasis on the relationship between myth and history. Visit to the National Archaeological Museum of Florence will reinforce the topics treated in class. The pictorial narratives, so common in Greek and Roman monuments and objects, will introduce the sophisticated visual language created by the Greeks to tell such elaborate tales; the visit to the Uffizi Gallery will show the students how Renaissance artists revived the Greek and Roman tradition. To know Roman mythology is to understand the real essence of the ideals and aspirations of the great Roman Empire, while in the study of Greek mythology lies the roots of modern psychology.
Greek and Roman Mythology
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 202
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 216 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: ENG 360 L Ancient Greek Literature
Hours: 45
Room: Fellini
Description: The traditional stories about the Greek and Roman gods and heroes have always been a fundamental part of Western Art and literature especially since their “rediscovery” by Renaissance humanism. The major divinities of Greek and Roman religion are examined in their historical and archaeological context, focusing on the influence that Greek myths had on the Roman world. The Iliad, The Odyssey, and Roman foundations myths and sagas will be discussed with particular emphasis on the relationship between myth and history. Visit to the National Archaeological Museum of Florence will reinforce the topics treated in class. The pictorial narratives, so common in Greek and Roman monuments and objects, will introduce the sophisticated visual language created by the Greeks to tell such elaborate tales; the visit to the Uffizi Gallery will show the students how Renaissance artists revived the Greek and Roman tradition. To know Roman mythology is to understand the real essence of the ideals and aspirations of the great Roman Empire, while in the study of Greek mythology lies the roots of modern psychology.
Greek and Roman Mythology
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 216 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: ENG 360 L: Ancient Greek Literature
Hours: 45
Room: Galileo
Description: The traditional stories about the Greek and Roman gods and heroes have always been a fundamental part of Western Art and literature especially since their “rediscovery” by Renaissance humanism. The major divinities of Greek and Roman religion are examined in their historical and archaeological context, focusing on the influence that Greek myths had on the Roman world. The Iliad, The Odyssey, and Roman foundations myths and sagas will be discussed with particular emphasis on the relationship between myth and history. Visit to the National Archaeological Museum of Florence will reinforce the topics treated in class. The pictorial narratives, so common in Greek and Roman monuments and objects, will introduce the sophisticated visual language created by the Greeks to tell such elaborate tales; the visit to the Uffizi Gallery will show the students how Renaissance artists revived the Greek and Roman tradition. To know Roman mythology is to understand the real essence of the ideals and aspirations of the great Roman Empire, while in the study of Greek mythology lies the roots of modern psychology.
Greek and Roman Mythology
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 216 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: ENG 360 L Ancient Greek Literature
Hours: 45
Room: Augusto
Description: The traditional stories about the Greek and Roman gods and heroes have always been a fundamental part of Western Art and literature especially since their “rediscovery” by Renaissance humanism. The major divinities of Greek and Roman religion are examined in their historical and archaeological context, focusing on the influence that Greek myths had on the Roman world. The Iliad, The Odyssey, and Roman foundations myths and sagas will be discussed with particular emphasis on the relationship between myth and history. The pictorial narratives, so common in Greek and Roman monuments and objects, will introduce the sophisticated visual language created by the Greeks to tell such elaborate tales. The post-classical afterlife of these myths will also be addressed. Visits to museums, monuments and/or sites will reinforce classroom learning. To know Roman mythology is to understand the real essence of the ideals and aspirations of the great Roman Empire, while in the study of Greek mythology lies the roots of modern psychology.
Greek and Roman Mythology
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 216 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: ENG 360 L Ancient Greek Literature
Hours: 45
Room: Traiano
Description: The traditional stories about the Greek and Roman gods and heroes have always been a fundamental part of Western Art and literature especially since their “rediscovery” by Renaissance humanism. The major divinities of Greek and Roman religion are examined in their historical and archaeological context, focusing on the influence that Greek myths had on the Roman world. The Iliad, The Odyssey, and Roman foundations myths and sagas will be discussed with particular emphasis on the relationship between myth and history. The pictorial narratives, so common in Greek and Roman monuments and objects, will introduce the sophisticated visual language created by the Greeks to tell such elaborate tales. The post-classical afterlife of these myths will also be addressed. Visits to museums, monuments and/or sites will reinforce classroom learning. To know Roman mythology is to understand the real essence of the ideals and aspirations of the great Roman Empire, while in the study of Greek mythology lies the roots of modern psychology.
Greek and Roman Mythology
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 216 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: ENG 360 L Ancient Greek Literature
Hours: 45
Room: Augusto
Description: The traditional stories about the Greek and Roman gods and heroes have always been a fundamental part of Western Art and literature especially since their “rediscovery” by Renaissance humanism. The major divinities of Greek and Roman religion are examined in their historical and archaeological context, focusing on the influence that Greek myths had on the Roman world. The Iliad, The Odyssey, and Roman foundations myths and sagas will be discussed with particular emphasis on the relationship between myth and history. The pictorial narratives, so common in Greek and Roman monuments and objects, will introduce the sophisticated visual language created by the Greeks to tell such elaborate tales. The post-classical afterlife of these myths will also be addressed. Visits to museums, monuments and/or sites will reinforce classroom learning. To know Roman mythology is to understand the real essence of the ideals and aspirations of the great Roman Empire, while in the study of Greek mythology lies the roots of modern psychology.
The "Mysterious" People of Ancient Italy: In Search of the Etruscans
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: None; a prior course in classics, art history, or history is recommended
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 218 T
Campus: Tuscania
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Largo della Rocca 7
Marist Code/Title: HIST 238 L The Mysterious People of Ancient Italy: In Search of the Etr.
Hours: 45
Room: Tina
Description: This course looks at the Etruscan achievements and legacy in the areas of culture and society, the visual arts, architecture, language, funerary practices, religious beliefs, trade, government, urban planning, and family life. By examining the “mysterious people” known as the Etruscans, students in this course will become familiar with a specific ancient culture and discover how archaeology and classical studies apply a range of tools to analyze it. While a good deal is known about the Etruscans and a substantial quantity of the material culture still survives, much is also lost, and many questions remain unanswered. They built richly furnished tombs, which are still extant, for their noble ancestors, yet their literature has virtually disappeared. After flourishing for over five centuries as the main culture in central Italy, from the Po Valley to the area around Naples, and even ruling Rome itself, they were absorbed into the Roman state in the third century BCE. Their mineral wealth, fertile fields, strategic harbors, and other geographical and economic advantages fueled vigorous exchanges across the lively world of the Mediterranean. This remarkable culture affected both the Greeks and the Romans, and its ideas, customs, artistic motifs, and fashions spread north to the rest of Europe. Students in this course benefit from Florence’s prime location at the center of Etruscan power through museum visits to examine firsthand the archaeological remains of the Etruscans.
The Etruscan and Roman Civilizations
MON to THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 245 T
Campus: Tuscania
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Largo della Rocca 7
Marist Code/Title: CSIT 250L Civilization of Italy
Hours: 45
Room: Artemisia
Description: This course presents a survey of the extraordinarily rich civilizations that thrived in Central Italy, where Tuscania flourished, from the 8th century BCE to the 5th century CE. Students will discover the political, social, cultural, and religious dimensions of the Etruscan and Roman cultures, engaging with surviving art, architecture and literature. Together we’ll discover their customs and daily life, starting from an analysis of the remaining archaeological evidence. Key issues in the practice of modern archaeology are explored through the use of case studies relating to the town of Tuscania and its surroundings (Tuscia), an area of exceptional archaeological interest and very rich in ancient history. Site visits enforce what the students have learned in class and enhance the understanding of these past cultures.
The Age of Barbarians: The "Fall" of the Roman Empire and the Birth of Medieval Europe
MON 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 247 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 257 L The Age of Barbarians
Hours: 45
Room: Augusto
Dual Listing: HIS 247 R
Description: The course provides a survey of the European “Dark Ages” by following the long transition that transformed the Western Roman Empire into a turmoil of barbarian kingdoms. This “Age of Barbarians” (4th -7th centuries CE; from Constantine to Charles the Great), also known as “Late Antiquity,” witnessed important political, religious and socio-economic changes, which effectively shaped Western Europe: during the process, several Roman institutions and traditions were granted continuity, while many others were forever obliterated. The available and often fragmentary sources – the most significant of which will be analyzed in class – paint a complex scenario, oscillating between aborted legacies, political upheavals and attempted revivals of an unsurpassable ancient glory; the former imperial unity slowly dissolves in a plurality of different new national and cultural identities. Respective focuses on each specific context involved (Italy, France, Spain, Britain, Germany, North Africa) will encompass most of the classes. Instability, delusional hopes and the lack of an imperial authority in the West, will last until the Christmas Night of 800 CE, when the Pope will crown a new Emperor of Rome, who will be defined “Roman,” although being a “barbarian.”
Ancient Egypt
MON 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 255 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 255 L Ancient Egypt
Hours: 45
Room: Leonardo
Description: The course provides an overview of ancient Egyptian civilization. It examines the material culture and human life of the inhabitants of the Nile Valley, and surveys major sites, objects, and texts to discover the essentials of Egyptian culture, politics, art, religion, and literature. The course covers 4000 years of ancient Egyptian civilization, from the origins of its culture in the late fourth millennium BCE to the late Roman Empire. This introduction to the art and archaeology of ancient Egypt also looks at the discipline of Egyptology, in which Italy has played an important part, and it will allow students to answer such questions as: "From where did Ancient Egypt originate?", "How were the pyramids built?", "How do you read hieroglyphics?", What did the afterlife signify to the ancient Egyptians?", "What was the Amarna revolution?". The course will explain these and other topics using archaeological data and historical sources, starting from the pieces present in the notable Egyptian Museum of Florence.
Co(ok)quinarius: Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES; lab fee required
Course code: ANC 264 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 264 L Co(ok)quinarius Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
Hours: 45
Room: Artusi
Dual Listing: NUH 264 F ANT 264 F
Description: Co(ok)quinarius, which takes place also within the fascinating context of the Florentine Central Food Market, explores the main elements of ancient Mediterranean food culture as the forerunner to modern Italian cuisine. Following the guidelines of experimental archaeology students learn to understand, prepare, taste, and evaluate ancient Etruscan, Greek, Roman as well as Near Eastern dishes within their social dimensions and cultural perspective. Starting from the distinction between the consumption and the use of food, students explore Etruscan, Greek, and Roman culinary traditions. Topics include the meanings of food, its social dimensions, the history of specific commodities; everyday eating habits and etiquette; rituals and taboos. This knowledge permits the class to accurately understand, recreate, cook, and taste ancient recipes. During interactive lessons students will improve their practical skills, learn how to prepare different recipes, and develop their knowledge of both the theory and practice of food anthropology. The key of the analysis is the Food Sign, a specially-developed tool with two inseparable sides: anthropological meaning and gastronomy. This instrument helps to show that in Antiquity any given dish wasn’t a mere result of a recipe to prepare food in a particular way as part of a meal, but was inevitably linked to sacral and social meanings. Students will be able to recognize and appreciate ancient traditions and to link them to the modern cuisine (when a particular tradition has continued) and interests.
Co(ok)quinarius: Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES; lab fee required
Course code: ANC 264 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 264 L Co(ok)quinarius Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
Hours: 45
Room: Buontalenti
Dual Listing: NUH 264 F ANT 264 F
Description: Co(ok)quinarius, which takes place also within the fascinating context of the Florentine Central Food Market, explores the main elements of ancient Mediterranean food culture as the forerunner to modern Italian cuisine. Following the guidelines of experimental archaeology students learn to understand, prepare, taste, and evaluate ancient Etruscan, Greek, Roman as well as Near Eastern dishes within their social dimensions and cultural perspective. Starting from the distinction between the consumption and the use of food, students explore Etruscan, Greek, and Roman culinary traditions. Topics include the meanings of food, its social dimensions, the history of specific commodities; everyday eating habits and etiquette; rituals and taboos. This knowledge permits the class to accurately understand, recreate, cook, and taste ancient recipes. During interactive lessons students will improve their practical skills, learn how to prepare different recipes, and develop their knowledge of both the theory and practice of food anthropology. The key of the analysis is the Food Sign, a specially-developed tool with two inseparable sides: anthropological meaning and gastronomy. This instrument helps to show that in Antiquity any given dish wasn’t a mere result of a recipe to prepare food in a particular way as part of a meal, but was inevitably linked to sacral and social meanings. Students will be able to recognize and appreciate ancient traditions and to link them to the modern cuisine (when a particular tradition has continued) and interests.
Co(ok)quinarius: Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
MON to THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES; lab fee required
Course code: ANC 264 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 264 L Co(ok)quinarius Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
Hours: 45
Room: Buontalenti
Dual Listing: NUH 264 F ANT 264 F
Description: Co(ok)quinarius, which takes place also within the fascinating context of the Florentine Central Food Market, explores the main elements of ancient Mediterranean food culture as the forerunner to modern Italian cuisine. Following the guidelines of experimental archaeology students learn to understand, prepare, taste, and evaluate ancient Etruscan, Greek, Roman as well as Near Eastern dishes within their social dimensions and cultural perspective. Starting from the distinction between the consumption and the use of food, students explore Etruscan, Greek, and Roman culinary traditions. Topics include the meanings of food, its social dimensions, the history of specific commodities; everyday eating habits and etiquette; rituals and taboos. This knowledge permits the class to accurately understand, recreate, cook, and taste ancient recipes. During interactive lessons students will improve their practical skills, learn how to prepare different recipes, and develop their knowledge of both the theory and practice of food anthropology. The key of the analysis is the Food Sign, a specially-developed tool with two inseparable sides: anthropological meaning and gastronomy. This instrument helps to show that in Antiquity any given dish wasn’t a mere result of a recipe to prepare food in a particular way as part of a meal, but was inevitably linked to sacral and social meanings. Students will be able to recognize and appreciate ancient traditions and to link them to the modern cuisine (when a particular tradition has continued) and interests.
Archaeology Field School: Tuscania (Italy)
MON to THU 8:30 AM-4:30 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES. A current tetanus vaccination and international health insurance (valid for study abroad) are mandatory. Daily schedule may vary and fieldwork may go from Monday - Friday. See brochure/syllabus for details.
Course code: ANC 282-283 T
Campus: Tuscania
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 6
Premises: Largo della Rocca 7
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 252 & ANTH 253 L Archeology Field I and II
Hours: 148
Room: Outdoor Class
Dual Listing: ANT 282-283 T HIS 282-283 T
Description: This four-week intensive course in archaeology is held at a specific site representing a distinctive ancient Mediterranean culture. The course offers students a unique combination of supervised onsite fieldwork and specialized academic instruction by archaeologists and other specialists. Participants contribute to the ongoing excavation and preservation of the site, learning essential practical archaeological techniques. The particular civilization represented by the site is analyzed in terms of its material culture, artistic production, and society (including political organization, religion, economy, and everyday life). The course includes weekly visits to sites, monuments and museums of relevance. The course is offered in collaboration with the Center for Ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern Studies (CAMNES). Offered at various sites, including two sponsored by the Lorenzo de’ Medici Institute. One of the richest sites for Etruscan culture, Tuscania in northern Latium, is situated in the southern area of the region inhabited by the Etruscans between the 9th and the 1st centuries BCE. Many features of the site and the wide range of artifacts discovered belong to later Etruscan culture (the Hellenistic period). The course focuses on Etruscan culture in a period of cosmopolitan expansion and assimilation to Roman culture. Learning activities may include visits to Cerveteri, Tarquinia, and the Museo di Villa Giulia in Rome. The excavation is overseen by the Lorenzo de’ Medici Institute, and CAMNES.
The Age of Heroes: The Iliad, the Odyssey, the Aeneid, and the Origins of Western Literature
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: A prior course in classics, literature, or religion
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 306 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: LIT 306 / ENG 270 L The Age of Heroes: Iliad, Odyssey, Aeneid and the Origins of Western Literature/ Classics of Western Lit
Hours: 45
Room: Machiavelli
Dual Listing: LIT 306 F
Description: The course focuses on ancient epic literature through the analysis and comparison of some of the oldest and greatest works of Western civilization. Through the reading of the most significant chapters of the Iliad and the Odyssey, students will get in contact with the supernatural world and the mighty heroes described by “Homer” in 8th century BCE. These stories, considered the “Bible” of classical civilization, show how Greeks used myth to express archetypal values, which became immortal for successive generations and civilizations. Myths are analyzed not only as amazing stories but also as expression of ancient cultural traditions, and as primary forms of communication and instruction. The influence of Greek myths on Roman legends will then be observed through the reading of some passages of the Aeneid, the national poem of Rome written by Virgil in the 1st century BCE.
The Age of Heroes: The Iliad, the Odyssey, the Aeneid, and the Origins of Western Literature
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: A prior course in classics, literature, or religion
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ANC 306 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Ancient Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: LIT 306 / ENG 270 L The Age of Heroes: Iliad, Odyssey, Aeneid and the Origins of Western Literature/ Classics of Western Lit
Hours: 45
Room: Verdi
Dual Listing: LIT 306 F
Description: The course focuses on ancient epic literature through the analysis and comparison of some of the oldest and greatest works of Western civilization. Through the reading of the most significant chapters of the Iliad and the Odyssey, students will get in contact with the supernatural world and the mighty heroes described by “Homer” in 8th century BCE. These stories, considered the “Bible” of classical civilization, show how Greeks used myth to express archetypal values, which became immortal for successive generations and civilizations. Myths are analyzed not only as amazing stories but also as expression of ancient cultural traditions, and as primary forms of communication and instruction. The influence of Greek myths on Roman legends will then be observed through the reading of some passages of the Aeneid, the national poem of Rome written by Virgil in the 1st century BCE.
Anthropology of Fashion and Desirability: Beyond the Catwalk
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: ANT 185 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: FASH 254 L Anthropology of Fashion and Desirability
Hours: 45
Room: Galileo
Dual Listing: FAS 185 F
Description: How are anthropology and fashion related? How can this social science help us in analyzing both Western fashion and global fashion trends today? How can artifacts become fashion? What is the relationship between fashion and art? How is beauty constructed in fashion and visual culture? And how are gender and the body represented? Such questions, of more than specialized interest, have been raised since fashion started to be studied in academia in the 1980s. This course considers the particular contribution of anthropology to the study of fashion as an academic discipline and hence to understanding fashion as a significant cultural expression. We will study how meanings are constructed in fashion and visual culture, using the cross-cultural and transnational framework provided by anthropological research. We will also consider how fashion interacts with material culture through the production and consumption of “fashion items,” making fashion an interesting field of inquiry in the context of the anthropology of things.
Anthropology of Fashion and Desirability: Beyond the Catwalk
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Course code: ANT 185 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: FASH 254 L Anthropology of Fashion and Desirability
Hours: 45
Room: Marconi
Dual Listing: FAS 185 F
Description: How are anthropology and fashion related? How can this social science help us in analyzing both Western fashion and global fashion trends today? How can artifacts become fashion? What is the relationship between fashion and art? How is beauty constructed in fashion and visual culture? And how are gender and the body represented? Such questions, of more than specialized interest, have been raised since fashion started to be studied in academia in the 1980s. This course considers the particular contribution of anthropology to the study of fashion as an academic discipline and hence to understanding fashion as a significant cultural expression. We will study how meanings are constructed in fashion and visual culture, using the cross-cultural and transnational framework provided by anthropological research. We will also consider how fashion interacts with material culture through the production and consumption of “fashion items,” making fashion an interesting field of inquiry in the context of the anthropology of things.
Archaeology Workshop
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Notes: lab fee required
Course code: ANT 193 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Premises: Via del Melarancio, 6/R
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 120L Introduction to Archeology
Hours: 45
Room: Archaeology Lab
Dual Listing: ANC 193 F RES 193 F
Description: This course combines an introduction to archaeology with hands-on work on 2500-year-old archaeological artefacts in LdM's Archaeology Lab. These artefacts have recently been unearthed in Central Italy at the Hellenistic necropolis of Bosco della Riserva, near Tuscania, where an excavation project is being conducted by CAMNES and LdM. Students will learn what happens to the finds once they leave their recovery contexts and arrive in Florence: here, under the guidance of the instructors, students will be involved in the fundamental activities of restoration, conservation, documentation, study, and storage of the finds. Students will also have the opportunity to sign up for the summer field school in Tuscania which operates directly at one of the archaeological sites.
Archaeology Workshop
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Notes: lab fee required
Course code: ANT 193 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Premises: Via del Melarancio, 6/R
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 120L Introduction to Archeology
Hours: 45
Room: Archaeology Lab
Dual Listing: ANC 193 F RES 193 F
Description: This course combines an introduction to archaeology with hands-on work on 2500-year-old archaeological artefacts in LdM's Archaeology Lab. These artefacts have recently been unearthed in Central Italy at the Hellenistic necropolis of Bosco della Riserva, near Tuscania, where an excavation project is being conducted by CAMNES and LdM. Students will learn what happens to the finds once they leave their recovery contexts and arrive in Florence: here, under the guidance of the instructors, students will be involved in the fundamental activities of restoration, conservation, documentation, study, and storage of the finds. Students will also have the opportunity to sign up for the summer field school in Tuscania which operates directly at one of the archaeological sites.
Food and Culture
MON 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: ANT 198 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 119 L Food and Culture
Hours: 45
Room: Donatello
Dual Listing: NUH 198 F
Description: If “you are what you eat,” just why do you eat the way you do? This course considers the relationships between the multiple meanings of food and the acts of preparing and eating food, and further explores food and personal and social identity. Students will examine why different people make different food choices in their daily lives, why individuals from certain social classes will avoid or appreciate particular foods, and, in general, how food serves as a factor in self-definition. Because a person's attitude toward food can reveal not just personal identity traits, but a whole food ideology, this course will also analyze the role of food in the construction of ethnic identity, in the display of religious beliefs and in the negotiation of gender roles. Students learn how cultures and values are transmitted and preserved through food. Through personal essays and interdisciplinary secondary literature students will be guided to analyze the complex and fascinating relationships between people and food, helping them to understand how cultures (including their own) ultimately determine all human food choices.
Food and Culture
MON to FRI 9:00 AM-11:45 AM
Section: 401
OPEN
Course code: ANT 198 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 119 L Food and Culture
Hours: 42
Room: Buontalenti
Dual Listing: NUH 198 F
Description: If “you are what you eat,” just why do you eat the way you do? This course considers the relationships between the multiple meanings of food and the acts of preparing and eating food, and further explores food and personal and social identity. Students will examine why different people make different food choices in their daily lives, why individuals from certain social classes will avoid or appreciate particular foods, and, in general, how food serves as a factor in self-definition. Because a person's attitude toward food can reveal not just personal identity traits, but a whole food ideology, this course will also analyze the role of food in the construction of ethnic identity, in the display of religious beliefs and in the negotiation of gender roles. Students learn how cultures and values are transmitted and preserved through food. Through personal essays and interdisciplinary secondary literature students will be guided to analyze the complex and fascinating relationships between people and food, helping them to understand how cultures (including their own) ultimately determine all human food choices.
Food and Culture
WED 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Course code: ANT 198 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 119 L Food and Culture
Hours: 45
Room: Raffaello
Dual Listing: NUH 198 F
Description: If “you are what you eat,” just why do you eat the way you do? This course considers the relationships between the multiple meanings of food and the acts of preparing and eating food, and further explores food and personal and social identity. Students will examine why different people make different food choices in their daily lives, why individuals from certain social classes will avoid or appreciate particular foods, and, in general, how food serves as a factor in self-definition. Because a person's attitude toward food can reveal not just personal identity traits, but a whole food ideology, this course will also analyze the role of food in the construction of ethnic identity, in the display of religious beliefs and in the negotiation of gender roles. Students learn how cultures and values are transmitted and preserved through food. Through personal essays and interdisciplinary secondary literature students will be guided to analyze the complex and fascinating relationships between people and food, helping them to understand how cultures (including their own) ultimately determine all human food choices.
Food and Culture
MON 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 202
OPEN
Course code: ANT 198 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 119 L Food and Culture
Hours: 45
Room: Marco Polo
Dual Listing: NUH 198 F
Description: If “you are what you eat,” just why do you eat the way you do? This course considers the relationships between the multiple meanings of food and the acts of preparing and eating food, and further explores food and personal and social identity. Students will examine why different people make different food choices in their daily lives, why individuals from certain social classes will avoid or appreciate particular foods, and, in general, how food serves as a factor in self-definition. Because a person's attitude toward food can reveal not just personal identity traits, but a whole food ideology, this course will also analyze the role of food in the construction of ethnic identity, in the display of religious beliefs and in the negotiation of gender roles. Students learn how cultures and values are transmitted and preserved through food. Through personal essays and interdisciplinary secondary literature students will be guided to analyze the complex and fascinating relationships between people and food, helping them to understand how cultures (including their own) ultimately determine all human food choices.
Co(ok)quinarius: Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Notes: lab fee required
Course code: ANT 264 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 264 L Co(ok)quinarius Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
Hours: 45
Room: Artusi
Dual Listing: ANC 264 F NUH 264 F
Description: Co(ok)quinarius, which takes place within the fascinating context of the Florentine Central Food Market, explores the main elements of ancient Mediterranean food culture as the forerunner to modern Italian cuisine. Students learn to understand, prepare, taste, and evaluate ancient Etruscan, Greek, Roman, as well as Near Eastern dishes within their social dimensions and cultural perspective. Starting from the distinction between the consumption and the use of food, students explore Etruscan, Greek, and Roman culinary traditions. Topics include the meanings of food, its social dimensions, the history of specific commodities; everyday eating habits and etiquette; rituals and taboos. This knowledge permits the class to accurately understand, recreate, cook, and taste ancient recipes. During interactive lessons students will improve their practical skills, learn how to prepare different recipes, and develop their knowledge of both the theory and practice of food anthropology. Students will be able to recognize and appreciate ancient traditions and to link them to modern cuisine and interests.
Co(ok)quinarius: Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Notes: lab fee required
Course code: ANT 264 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 264 L Co(ok)quinarius Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
Hours: 45
Room: Buontalenti
Dual Listing: ANC 264 F NUH 264 F
Description: Co(ok)quinarius, which takes place within the fascinating context of the Florentine Central Food Market, explores the main elements of ancient Mediterranean food culture as the forerunner to modern Italian cuisine. Students learn to understand, prepare, taste, and evaluate ancient Etruscan, Greek, Roman, as well as Near Eastern dishes within their social dimensions and cultural perspective. Starting from the distinction between the consumption and the use of food, students explore Etruscan, Greek, and Roman culinary traditions. Topics include the meanings of food, its social dimensions, the history of specific commodities; everyday eating habits and etiquette; rituals and taboos. This knowledge permits the class to accurately understand, recreate, cook, and taste ancient recipes. During interactive lessons students will improve their practical skills, learn how to prepare different recipes, and develop their knowledge of both the theory and practice of food anthropology. Students will be able to recognize and appreciate ancient traditions and to link them to modern cuisine and interests.
Co(ok)quinarius: Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
MON to THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Notes: lab fee required
Course code: ANT 264 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 264 L Co(ok)quinarius Ancient Sources of Italian Cuisine
Hours: 45
Room: Buontalenti
Dual Listing: ANC 264 F NUH 264 F
Description: Co(ok)quinarius, which takes place within the fascinating context of the Florentine Central Food Market, explores the main elements of ancient Mediterranean food culture as the forerunner to modern Italian cuisine. Students learn to understand, prepare, taste, and evaluate ancient Etruscan, Greek, Roman, as well as Near Eastern dishes within their social dimensions and cultural perspective. Starting from the distinction between the consumption and the use of food, students explore Etruscan, Greek, and Roman culinary traditions. Topics include the meanings of food, its social dimensions, the history of specific commodities; everyday eating habits and etiquette; rituals and taboos. This knowledge permits the class to accurately understand, recreate, cook, and taste ancient recipes. During interactive lessons students will improve their practical skills, learn how to prepare different recipes, and develop their knowledge of both the theory and practice of food anthropology. Students will be able to recognize and appreciate ancient traditions and to link them to modern cuisine and interests.
Archaeology Field School: Tuscania (Italy)
MON to THU 8:30 AM-4:30 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Notes: in collaboration with CAMNES. A current tetanus vaccination and international health insurance (valid for study abroad) are mandatory. Daily schedule may vary and fieldwork may go from Monday - Friday. See brochure/syllabus for details.
Course code: ANT 282-283 T
Campus: Tuscania
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 6
Premises: Largo della Rocca 7
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 252 & ANTH 253 L Archeology Field I and II
Hours: 120
Room: Outdoor Class
Dual Listing: ANC 282-283 T HIS 282-283 T
Description: This four-week intensive course in archaeology is held at a specific site representing a distinctive ancient Mediterranean culture. The course offers students a unique combination of supervised onsite fieldwork and specialized academic instruction by archaeologists and other specialists. Participants contribute to the ongoing excavation and preservation of the site, learning essential practical archaeological techniques. The particular civilization represented by the site is analyzed in terms of its material culture, artistic production, and society (including political organization, religion, economy, and everyday life). The course includes weekly visits to sites, monuments and museums of relevance. The course is offered in collaboration with the Center for Ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern Studies (CAMNES). Offered at various sites, including two sponsored by the Lorenzo de’ Medici Institute. One of the richest sites for Etruscan culture, Tuscania in northern Latium, is situated in the southern area of the region inhabited by the Etruscans between the 9th and the 1st centuries BCE. Many features of the site and the wide range of artifacts discovered belong to later Etruscan culture (the Hellenistic period). The course focuses on Etruscan culture in a period of cosmopolitan expansion and assimilation to Roman culture. Learning activities may include visits to Cerveteri, Tarquinia, and the Museo di Villa Giulia in Rome. The excavation is overseen by the Lorenzo de’ Medici Institute, and CAMNES.
The Mediterranean: History, Peoples, and Integration
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: ANT 286 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: POLI 285 L The Politics of the Mediterranean
Hours: 45
Room: Tito
Dual Listing: POL 285 R
Description: This course introduces students to the peoples of the Mediterranean region, and aims to provide them with an understanding of the complex social, religious, and cultural realities of the area. After a historical overview of contemporary events (especially in the Maghreb region) and Euro-Mediterranean relationships, attention will be focused on the recent waves of migration from the south shore of the Mediterranean to Europe, its problems and possibilities for the future of the area. The course will analyze the difficulties of the coexistence with different cultures in European societies, and the ranges of intercultural mediation practices available that might foster real dialogue and reconciliation among different communities. Special attention will be paid to the analysis of the Islamic community and the success or failure of mediation practices in various social contexts.
The Mediterranean: History, Peoples, and Integration
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Course code: ANT 286 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: POLI 285 L The Politics of the Mediterranean
Hours: 45
Room: Tito
Dual Listing: POL 285 R
Description: This course introduces students to the peoples of the Mediterranean region, and aims to provide them with an understanding of the complex social, religious, and cultural realities of the area. After a historical overview of contemporary events (especially in the Maghreb region) and Euro-Mediterranean relationships, attention will be focused on the recent waves of migration from the south shore of the Mediterranean to Europe, its problems and possibilities for the future of the area. The course will analyze the difficulties of the coexistence with different cultures in European societies, and the ranges of intercultural mediation practices available that might foster real dialogue and reconciliation among different communities. Special attention will be paid to the analysis of the Islamic community and the success or failure of mediation practices in various social contexts.
The Mediterranean: History, Peoples, and Integration
MON to THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Course code: ANT 286 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: POLI 285 L The Politics of the Mediterranean
Hours: 45
Room: Augusto
Dual Listing: POL 285 R
Description: This course introduces students to the peoples of the Mediterranean region, and aims to provide them with an understanding of the complex social, religious, and cultural realities of the area. After a historical overview of contemporary events (especially in the Maghreb region) and Euro-Mediterranean relationships, attention will be focused on the recent waves of migration from the south shore of the Mediterranean to Europe, its problems and possibilities for the future of the area. The course will analyze the difficulties of the coexistence with different cultures in European societies, and the ranges of intercultural mediation practices available that might foster real dialogue and reconciliation among different communities. Special attention will be paid to the analysis of the Islamic community and the success or failure of mediation practices in various social contexts.
Anthropology of Violence and Conflict
MON 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: ANT 326 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 150 L Anthropology of Violence and Conflict
Hours: 45
Room: Stone
Dual Listing: POL 326 F
Description: Conflict pervades our daily lives, and violence erupts indirectly or directly into our experience. What is the distinction between the two, and what are intelligent and effective ways to deal with them? In this course students apply concepts from anthropology and political science to the dynamics of conflict and violence, of various types and levels, in contemporary society. The course examines major definitions of violence and conflict, exploring classic and notable theories and debates in the social sciences and other disciplines. A basic distinction between interpersonal and group dynamics receives much attention. Most focus will be upon the “macro” level: the ways in which communities, states, and other associations deal with the escalation of conflict and the real or presumed conditions underlying violence (such as exclusion or asymmetries in power structure). Issues addressed include the impact of globalization, cultural differences, identity and constituency, and the processes leading towards conflict transformation, peace, and reconciliation.
Anthropology of Violence and Conflict
MON 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Course code: ANT 326 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 150 L Anthropology of Violence and Conflict
Hours: 45
Room: Machiavelli
Dual Listing: POL 326 F
Description: Conflict pervades our daily lives, and violence erupts indirectly or directly into our experience. What is the distinction between the two, and what are intelligent and effective ways to deal with them? In this course students apply concepts from anthropology and political science to the dynamics of conflict and violence, of various types and levels, in contemporary society. The course examines major definitions of violence and conflict, exploring classic and notable theories and debates in the social sciences and other disciplines. A basic distinction between interpersonal and group dynamics receives much attention. Most focus will be upon the “macro” level: the ways in which communities, states, and other associations deal with the escalation of conflict and the real or presumed conditions underlying violence (such as exclusion or asymmetries in power structure). Issues addressed include the impact of globalization, cultural differences, identity and constituency, and the processes leading towards conflict transformation, peace, and reconciliation.
Anthropology of Violence and Conflict
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
OPEN
Course code: ANT 326 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Anthropology
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: ANTH 150 L Anthropology of Violence and Conflict
Hours: 45
Room: Tiberio
Dual Listing: POL 326 R
Description: Conflict pervades our daily lives, and violence erupts indirectly or directly into our experience. What is the distinction between the two, and what are intelligent and effective ways to deal with them? In this course students apply concepts from anthropology and political science to the dynamics of conflict and violence, of various types and levels, in contemporary society. The course examines major definitions of violence and conflict, exploring classic and notable theories and debates in the social sciences and other disciplines. A basic distinction between interpersonal and group dynamics receives much attention. Most focus will be upon the “macro” level: the ways in which communities, states, and other associations deal with the escalation of conflict and the real or presumed conditions underlying violence (such as exclusion or asymmetries in power structure). Issues addressed include the impact of globalization, cultural differences, identity and constituency, and the processes leading towards conflict transformation, peace, and reconciliation.
The Built Environment of Florence
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: ARC 201 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Architecture
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: ARCH 180 L The Built Environment of Florence
Hours: 45
Room: Donatello
Dual Listing: ART 201 F
Description: This course will explore the factors that have led to the development of Florence, its architecture and open spaces. The construction of the city up to the architecture of the 19th century will be studied from architectural and historical points of view. This course is divided into lectures in class, walking tours, visits, field trips, and sketching on site, all fundamental for the understanding of the city. We will draw on the parallel history of the town of Florence to understand the growth of the city, but the main focus will be on the architecture and the way it developed. To better understand the historical development of the city, the course will also focus on the history, the artistic productions of the time, the philosophical currents, and the powerful families that ruled and determined different architectural choices.
The Built Environment of Florence
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
FULL
Course code: ARC 201 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Architecture
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: ARCH 180 L The Built Environment of Florence
Hours: 45
Room: Machiavelli
Dual Listing: ART 201 F
Description: This course will explore the factors that have led to the development of Florence, its architecture, and open spaces. The construction of the city up to the architecture of the 19th century will be studied from architectural and historical points of view. This course is divided into lectures in class, walking tours, visits, field trips, and sketching on site, all fundamental for the understanding of the city. We will draw on the parallel history of the town of Florence to understand the growth of the city, but the main focus will be on the architecture and the way it developed. To better understand the historical development of the city, the course will also focus on the history, the artistic productions of the time, the philosophical currents, and the powerful families that ruled and determined different architectural choices.
The Built Environment of Florence
MON to THU 1:15 PM-3:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Course code: ARC 201 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Architecture
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: ARCH 180 L The Built Environment of Florence
Hours: 45
Room: Stone
Dual Listing: ART 201 F
Description: This course will explore the factors that have led to the development of Florence, its architecture and open spaces. The construction of the city up to the architecture of the 19th century will be studied from the architectural and historical points of view. This course is divided into lectures in class, walking tours, visits, field trips and sketching on site, all fundamental for the understanding of the city. We will draw on the parallel history of the town of Florence to understand the growth of the city, but the main interest will be on the architecture and the way it developed. To better understand the historical development of the city the course will also focus on the history, the artistic productions of the time, the philosophical currents and the powerful families that ruled and determined different architectural choices.
20th Century Design and Architecture
WED 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: ARC 202 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Architecture
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: ITDS 150 / ARCH 140 L History of Interior Design
Hours: 45
Room: Caravaggio
Dual Listing: ART 202 F
Description: The aim of the course is to give the students the instruments and methodology to understand and recognize interior design styles. During the lessons the students will become familiar with the work of the outstanding masters that often applied their talents to the small scale (object and interior design) as well as to the large one (architecture) from the mid-19th century to 1960. Because interior design is so strongly related to object design and architecture, the course analyses the history of these three fields as a whole, from the industrial revolution to the present time, by studying the influence of society, art, economy, political events, scientific, and technological discoveries. The course provides students with the tools to understand innovative elements introduced by a new trend and to remain up-to-date in this ever-changing field.
20th Century Design and Architecture
THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Course code: ARC 202 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Architecture
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: ITDS 150 / ARCH 140 L History of Interior Design
Hours: 45
Room: Marconi
Dual Listing: ART 202 F
Description: The aim of the course is to give the students the instruments and methodology to understand and recognize interior design styles. During the lessons the students will become familiar with the work of the outstanding masters that often applied their talent to the small scale (object or interior design) as well as to the large one (architecture) from the mid 19th century to 1960. Because interior design is so strongly related to object design and architecture, the course analyses the history of these three fields as a whole, from the industrial revolution to the present time, by studying the influence of society, art, economy, political events and scientific and technological discoveries. The course provides students with the tools for understanding new and innovative elements that a new trend introduces and for keeping updated with the latest news in this ever-changing field.
Aesthetics of Design: Theory and Practice
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: INT 170 Product Design I, or ART 180 Art History I, or ART 186 Art History II, or equivalents
Course code: ARC 220 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Architecture
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza San Lorenzo, 7
Marist Code/Title: ITDS 330/ARTL 215 L Aesthetics of Design
Hours: 45
Room: Munari
Dual Listing: INT 220 F
Description: This course applies the methods and concepts of aesthetics (the investigation of what makes something a work of art) to the field of design (including product design, interior design, architecture, and graphic design). Students investigate issues relating to the creation, value, and experience of design, and they analyze and attempt to resolve problems relating to design as a form of art. One part of the course concentrates on meanings of formalism and expressionism; another part explores issues that are involved in the evaluation of design such as cultural, social, and political environments. Specific attention is given to Italian Design, from its Renaissance heritage to the decades that made it internationally famous (1960-80s). Comparisons are made with Modern and Contemporary International Design. Students are encouraged to make the most of the visual and cultural experience offered by the city and by the international environment of the institute.
Aesthetics of Design: Theory and Practice
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: INT 170 Product Design I, or ART 180 Art History I, or ART 186 Art History II, or equivalent
Course code: ARC 220 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Architecture
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza San Lorenzo, 7
Marist Code/Title: ITDS 330/ARTL 215 L Aesthetics of Design
Hours: 45
Room: Munari
Dual Listing: INT 220 F
Description: This course applies the methods and concepts of aesthetics (the investigation of what makes something a work of art) to the field of design (including product design, interior design, architecture, and graphic design). Students investigate issues relating to the creation, value, and experience of design, and they analyze and attempt to resolve problems relating to design as a form of art. One part of the course concentrates on meanings of formalism and expressionism; another part explores issues that are involved in the evaluation of design such as cultural, social, and political environments. Specific attention is given to Italian Design, from its Renaissance heritage to the decades that made it internationally famous (1960-80s). Comparisons are made with Modern and Contemporary International Design. Students are encouraged to make the most of the visual and cultural experience offered by the city and by the international environment of the institute.
Public Space Design
MON 9:00 AM-11:30 AM & 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: INT 190 CAD for Interior Design I and ARC 175 Foundations of Architectural Design, or equivalent
Notes: personal laptop for design projects recommended
Course code: ARC 269 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Architecture
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza San Lorenzo, 7
Marist Code/Title: ITDS 260 N Design Urban Spaces
Hours: 90
Room: Albini
Description: The course will investigate the key role of public space in contemporary cities. Special attention will be placed on the capability of places to attract people and emotional scenarios linked to their reactions. Examples of recent works from world-renowned architects, landscape architects, and artists will provide the student with different design methods. A specific site in Florence or elsewhere in its surroundings will represent the core of the project; students will be asked to start off with a conceptual idea and gradually give shape to it up to the final presentation through drawings, models, video, etc. The course will mainly be carried out in class although outdoor guided surveys will also take place.
Public Space Design
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM & 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: INT 190 CAD for Interior Design I and ARC 175 Foundations of Architectural Design, or equivalents
Notes: personal laptop for design projects recommended
Course code: ARC 269 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Architecture
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza San Lorenzo, 7
Marist Code/Title: ITDS 260 N Design Urban Spaces
Hours: 90
Room: Mollino
Description: The course will investigate the key role of public space in contemporary cities. Special attention will be placed on the capability of places to attract people and emotional scenarios linked to their reactions. Examples of recent works from world-renowned architects, landscape architects and artists will provide the student with different design methods. A specific site in Florence or elsewhere in its surroundings will represent the core of the project; students will be asked to start off with a conceptual idea and gradually give shape to it up to the final presentation through drawings, models, video, etc. The course will be mainly carried out in class although outdoor guided surveys will also take place.
Public Space Design
WED 9:00 AM-11:30 AM & 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 202
OPEN
Prerequisites: INT 190 CAD for Interior Design I and ARC 175 Foundations of Architectural Design, or equivalents
Notes: personal laptop for design projects recommended
Course code: ARC 269 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Architecture
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza San Lorenzo, 7
Marist Code/Title: ITDS 260 N Design Urban Spaces
Hours: 90
Room: Mollino
Description: The course will investigate the key role of public space in contemporary cities. Special attention will be placed on the capability of places to attract people and emotional scenarios linked to their reactions. Examples of recent works from world-renowned architects, landscape architects and artists will provide the student with different design methods. A specific site in Florence or elsewhere in its surroundings will represent the core of the project; students will be asked to start off with a conceptual idea and gradually give shape to it up to the final presentation through drawings, models, video, etc. The course will be mainly carried out in class although outdoor guided surveys will also take place.
Public Space Design (Summer only)
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: INT 190 CAD for Interior Design I and ARC 175 Foundations of Architectural Design, or equivalent
Notes: personal laptop for design projects recommended
Course code: ARC 270 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Architecture
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza San Lorenzo, 7
Marist Code/Title: ITDS 260 N Design Urban Spaces
Hours: 45
Room: Albini
Description: The course will investigate the key role of public space in contemporary cities. Special attention will be placed on the capability of places to attract people and emotional scenarios linked to their reactions. Examples of recent works from world-renowned architects, landscape architects, and artists will provide the student with different design methods. A specific site in Florence or elsewhere in its surroundings will represent the core of the project; students will be asked to start off with a conceptual idea and gradually give shape to it up to the final presentation through drawings, models, video, etc. The course will mainly be carried out in class although outdoor guided surveys will also take place.
Contemporary Architecture
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: ART 165 History of Architecture, or equivalent
Course code: ARC 286 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Architecture
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: ARCH 120 L Contemporary Architecture
Hours: 45
Room: Caravaggio
Dual Listing: ART 286 F
Description: This course examines major developments in architecture, interior design and planning from 1960 to the present. Special focus is given to developments in the last two decades. The survey includes consideration of sociocultural developments, as well as debates in aesthetics and theory, such as the decline of Modernism. Key architects and studios are examined. The perspective is global, but with an emphasis on European and, especially, Italian
Contemporary Architecture
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: ART 165 History of Architecture, or equivalent
Course code: ARC 286 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Architecture
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: ARCH 120 L Contemporary Architecture
Hours: 45
Room: Marco Polo
Dual Listing: ART 286 F
Description: This course examines major developments in architecture, interior design and planning from 1960 to the present. Special focus is given to developments of the last two decades. The survey includes consideration of sociocultural developments, as well as debates in aesthetics and theory, such as the decline of Modernism. Key architects and studios are examined. The perspective is global but European and Italian figures, movements, works and events are not ignored.
Sustainable Architecture
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM & 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: Architecture majors of junior standing
Notes: personal laptop for design projects recommended
Course code: ARC 320 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Architecture
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza San Lorenzo, 7
Marist Code/Title: ARCH 312 L Sustainable Architecture
Hours: 90
Room: Mollino
Description: Sustainability is a characteristic of a process or condition that can be maintained at a certain level indefinitely. Our current lifestyle is not sustainable because we base our energy requirements on burning fossil fuels that are running out, causing global warming and pollution. The key aim of the sustainable architecture approach is to help resolve the present energy crisis by designing self-sufficient buildings. The two basic principles applied are: reduction of energy needs and the use of renewable forms of energy (solar, wind, geothermic, hydroelectric or biomass). Other topics touched upon in the course are: the use of local building materials, the study of local traditional passive strategies such as how to create a pleasant home despite climate conditions and encouraging a sustainable lifestyle such as cohabitation-housing.
Sustainable Architecture
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM & 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 102
OPEN
Prerequisites: Architecture majors of junior standing
Notes: personal laptop for design projects recommended
Course code: ARC 320 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Architecture
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza San Lorenzo, 7
Marist Code/Title: ARCH 312 L Sustainable Architecture
Hours: 90
Room: Mollino
Description: Sustainability is a characteristic of a process or condition that can be maintained at a certain level indefinitely. Our current lifestyle is not sustainable because we base our energy requirements on burning fossil fuels that are running out, causing global warming and pollution. The key aim of the sustainable architecture approach is to help resolve the present energy crisis by designing self-sufficient buildings. The two basic principles applied are: reduction of energy needs and the use of renewable forms of energy (solar, wind, geothermic, hydroelectric or biomass). Other topics touched upon in the course are: the use of local building materials; the study of local traditional passive strategies such as how to create a pleasant home despite climate conditions and encouraging a sustainable lifestyle such as cohabitation-housing.
Sustainable Architecture
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM & 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: Architecture majors of junior standing
Notes: personal laptop for design projects recommended
Course code: ARC 320 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Architecture
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza San Lorenzo, 7
Marist Code/Title: ARCH 312 L Sustainable Architecture
Hours: 90
Room: Albini
Description: Sustainability is a characteristic of a process or state that can be maintained at a certain level indefinitely. Our current lifestyle is not sustainable because we base our energy requirements on burning fossil fuels that are running out, causing global warming and pollution. The key aim of the sustainable architecture approach is to help resolve the present energy crisis by designing self-sufficient buildings. The two basic principles applied are: reduction of energy needs and use of renewable forms of energy (solar, wind, geothermic, hydroelectric or biomass). Other topics touched upon in the course are: use of local building materials, study of the local traditional passive strategies (to create a pleasant home despite climate conditions), encouraging a sustainable lifestyle, co-housing.
Sustainable Architecture
MON 9:00 AM-11:30 AM & 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 202
OPEN
Prerequisites: Architecture majors of junior standing
Notes: personal laptop for design projects recommended
Course code: ARC 320 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Architecture
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza San Lorenzo, 7
Marist Code/Title: ARCH 312 L Sustainable Architecture
Hours: 90
Room: Mollino
Description: Sustainability is a characteristic of a process or state that can be maintained at a certain level indefinitely. Our current lifestyle is not sustainable because we base our energy requirements on burning fossil fuels that are running out, causing global warming and pollution. The key aim of the sustainable architecture approach is to help resolve the present energy crisis by designing self-sufficient buildings. The two basic principles applied are: reduction of energy needs and use of renewable forms of energy (solar, wind, geothermic, hydroelectric or biomass). Other topics touched upon in the course are: use of local building materials, study of the local traditional passive strategies (to create a pleasant home despite climate conditions), encouraging a sustainable lifestyle, co-housing.
Sustainable Architecture (Summer only)
MON to THU 4:15 PM-6:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: Architecture majors of junior standing
Notes: personal laptop for design projects recommended
Course code: ARC 321 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Architecture
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza San Lorenzo, 7
Marist Code/Title: ARCH 312 L Sustainable Architecture
Hours: 45
Room: Mollino
Description: Sustainability is a characteristic of a process or state that can be maintained at a certain level indefinitely. Our current lifestyle is not sustainable because we base our energy requirements on burning fossil fuels that are running out, causing global warming and pollution. The key aim of the sustainable architecture approach is to help resolve the present energy crisis by designing self-sufficient buildings. The two basic principles applied are: reduction of energy needs and use of renewable forms of energy (solar, wind, geothermic, hydroelectric or biomass). Other topics touched upon in the course are: use of local building materials, study of the local traditional passive strategies (to create a pleasant home despite climate conditions), encouraging a sustainable lifestyle, co-housing.
Architecture in its Environment
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM & 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 101
FULL
Prerequisites: Architecture majors of junior standing
Notes: personal laptop for design projects recommended
Course code: ARC 340 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Architecture
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza San Lorenzo, 7
Marist Code/Title: ARCH 311 L Architecture in its Environment
Hours: 90
Room: Albini
Description: The goal of this course is to learn a method to understand the relationship between architecture and the urban context and to be able to design a relevant architectural project. Emphasis is on the vertical and horizontal dimensions of cities and towns, and on the analysis of shapes and uses of the urban space. The main course project relates to a specific urban situation. The process of the project starts with extensive onsite case study analysis of a site (with outdoor walking and sketching), of its historical context and urban surroundings. In class students will develop, examine, and discuss the main elements, themes, and issues of the project. The completed project includes sketches, site plans, architectural plans, elevations, and sections, as well as an oral presentation delivered in class. Note: It is highly recommended that students be equipped with a personal laptop for design projects.
Architecture in its Environment
MON 3:00 PM-5:30 PM & 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: Architecture majors of junior standing
Notes: personal laptop for design projects recommended
Course code: ARC 340 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Architecture
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza San Lorenzo, 7
Marist Code/Title: ARCH 311 L Architecture in its Environment
Hours: 90
Room: Ponti
Description: The course goal is to learn a method to understand the relation between architecture and urban context and to be able to design a relevant architectural project. Emphasis is on the vertical and horizontal dimensions of cities and towns, and on the analysis of shapes and uses of the urban space. The main course project relates to a specific urban situation. The project process starts with extensive on-site case study analysis of the site (with outdoor walking and sketching), historical context, and the urban surroundings. In class students will develop, examine and discuss the main elements, themes and issues of the project. The completed project includes sketches, site plans, architectural plans, elevations and sections, as well as a presentation delivered in class.
Architecture in its Environment
THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM & 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 202
OPEN
Prerequisites: Architecture majors of junior standing
Notes: A personal laptop for design projects is highly recommended.
Course code: ARC 340 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Architecture
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza San Lorenzo, 7
Marist Code/Title: ARCH 311 L Architecture in its Environment
Hours: 90
Room: Mollino
Description: The goal of this course is to learn a method to understand the relationship between architecture and urban context and to be able to design a relevant architectural project. Emphasis is on the vertical and horizontal dimensions of cities and towns, and on the analysis of shapes and uses of the urban space. The main course project relates to a specific urban situation. The process of the project starts with extensive on-site case study analysis of a site (with outdoor walking and sketching), of its historical context and urban surroundings. In class students will develop, examine, and discuss the main elements, themes, and issues of the project. The completed project includes sketches, site plans, architectural plans, elevations, and sections, as well as an oral presentation delivered in class. Note: It is highly recommended that students be equipped with a personal laptop for design projects.
Architecture in its Environment (Summer only)
MON to THU 4:15 PM-6:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: Architecture majors of junior standing
Notes: personal laptop for design projects recommended
Course code: ARC 341 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Architecture
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza San Lorenzo, 7
Marist Code/Title: ARCH 311 L Architecture in its Environment
Hours: 45
Room: Ponti
Description: The goal of this course is to learn a method to understand the relationship between architecture and the urban context and to be able to design a relevant architectural project. Emphasis is on the vertical and horizontal dimensions of cities and towns, and on the analysis of shapes and uses of the urban space. The main course project relates to a specific urban situation. The process of the project starts with extensive onsite case study analysis of a site (with outdoor walking and sketching), of its historical context and urban surroundings. In class students will develop, examine, and discuss the main elements, themes, and issues of the project. The completed project includes sketches, site plans, architectural plans, elevations, and sections, as well as an oral presentation delivered in class. Note: It is highly recommended that students be equipped with a personal laptop for design projects.
Architecture Studio: Special Topics
WED 9:00 AM-11:30 AM & 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: Architecture majors of junior standing
Notes: semester topic: ARCHITECTURE OF TRANSPORTATION DESIGN
Course code: ARC 380 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Architecture
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza San Lorenzo, 7
Marist Code/Title: ARCH 380 N ST: Architecture Studio
Hours: 90
Room: Albini
Description: This course focuses on advanced design projects, which are based largely on a theme of local or national importance. It is usually concerned with the comprehensive analysis and design of modern medium/large scale complexes and public buildings such as museums, airports, railway stations, waterfronts, or emergency constructions. The course is organized to equip students with the skill sets to create a comprehensive design and implement architectural projects of notable complexity and scale.
Architecture Studio: Special Topics
FRI 9:00 AM-11:30 AM & 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: Architecture majors of junior standing
Notes: semester topic: ARCHITECTURE OF TRANSPORTATION DESIGN
Course code: ARC 380 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Architecture
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza San Lorenzo, 7
Marist Code/Title: ARCH 380 N ST: Architecture Studio
Hours: 90
Room: Ponti
Description: This course focuses on advanced design projects, which are based largely on a theme of local or national importance. It is usually concerned with the comprehensive analysis and design of modern medium/large scale complexes and public buildings such as a museum, airport, railway stations, waterfront, or emergency construction. The course is organized to equip students with the skills for the comprehensive design and implementation of architectural projects of notable complexity and scale.
History of Architecture
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: ART 165 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 110 L History of Architecture
Hours: 45
Room: Tiziano
Description: This course surveys the major periods and key monuments in the history of architecture from antiquity to the present, focusing on the Western world. Emphasis is on the historical periods from classical antiquity through the Middle Ages, Renaissance, to the Modern Age, and on contemporary developments. It examines representative monuments and architects from ancient Greece (the Parthenon in Athens) to the present day. The architect’s pursuit of the changing ideas of beauty is a leitmotif that links the development of architecture with such masters as Iktinos, Brunelleschi, Borromini, and Le Corbusier. Typologies, materials and construction technology, theory, urbanism, and cultural context, are addressed. The course also explores the great variety of architectural traditions, orders, styles and movements. By experiencing actual buildings of various periods in the urban context, students learn how to critically analyze a work of architecture.
History of Architecture
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Course code: ART 165 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 110 L History of Architecture
Hours: 45
Room: Verdi
Description: This course surveys the major periods and key monuments in the history of architecture from antiquity to the present, focusing on the Western world. Emphasis is on the historical periods from classical antiquity through the Middle Ages, Renaissance, to the Modern Age, and on contemporary developments. It examines representative monuments and architects from ancient Greece (the Parthenon in Athens) to the present day. The architect’s pursuit of the changing ideas of beauty is a leitmotif that links the development of architecture with such masters as Iktinos, Brunelleschi, Borromini, and Le Corbusier. Typologies, materials and construction technology, theory, urbanism, and cultural context, are addressed. The course also explores the great variety of architectural traditions, orders, styles, and movements. By experiencing actual buildings of various periods in the urban context, students learn how to critically analyze a work of architecture.
Art History I: Antiquity to Early Renaissance
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: ART 180 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: ART 160 L History of Western Art I
Hours: 45
Room: Puccini
Description: This course is a survey of the visual arts in Western Europe, from ancient Greece to the Early Renaissance. In this course students encounter the principal monuments, artists, and themes in painting, sculpture, and architecture, and discover the changes in styles and taste in this period. The course explores the historical, philosophical and cultural contexts essential to understanding the visual arts and the impact they have had through the ages. Great importance is given to the interpretation of subjects and symbols, to the different techniques and styles used by artists, and to the role of public and private patrons. Onsite teaching provides the incomparable experience of studying important works of art and architecture first hand. The material is approached as an introduction to the discipline of art history, with the aim of fostering appreciation and the desire to further investigate this field.
Art History I: Antiquity to Early Renaissance
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 102
FULL
Course code: ART 180 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: ART 160 L History of Western Art I
Hours: 45
Room: Stone
Description: This course is a survey of the visual arts in Western Europe, from ancient Greece to the Early Renaissance. In this course students encounter the principal monuments, artists, and themes in painting, sculpture, and architecture, and discover the changes in styles and taste in this period. The course explores the historical, philosophical and cultural contexts essential to understanding the visual arts and the impact they have had through the ages. Great importance is given to the interpretation of subjects and symbols, to the different techniques and styles used by artists, and to the role of public and private patrons. Onsite teaching provides the incomparable experience of studying important works of art and architecture first hand. The material is approached as an introduction to the discipline of art history, with the aim of fostering appreciation and the desire to further investigate this field.
Art History I: Antiquity to Early Renaissance
MON to FRI 9:00 AM-11:45 AM
Section: 401
OPEN
Course code: ART 180 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: ART 160 L History of Western Art I
Hours: 42
Room: Raffaello
Description: This course is a survey of the visual arts in Western Europe, from ancient Greece to the Early Renaissance. Throughout this course students encounter the principal monuments, artists and themes in painting, sculpture and architecture, and discover the changes in styles and taste in this period. The course explores the historical, philosophical and cultural contexts essential to understanding the visual arts and the impact they have had through the ages. Great importance is given to the interpretation of subjects and symbols, to the different techniques and styles used by artists, and to the role of public and private patrons. On-site teaching provides the incomparable experience of studying important works of art and architecture first-hand. The material is approached as an introduction to the discipline of art history, with the aim of fostering appreciation and the desire to further investigate this field.
Art History I: Antiquity to Early Renaissance
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
FULL
Course code: ART 180 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: ART 160 L History of Western Art I
Hours: 45
Room: Donatello
Description: This course is a survey of the visual arts in Western Europe, from ancient Greece to the Early Renaissance. In this course students encounter the principal monuments, artists, and themes in painting, sculpture, and architecture, and discover the changes in styles and taste in this period. The course explores the historical, philosophical, and cultural contexts essential to understanding the visual arts and the impact they have had through the ages. Great importance is given to the interpretation of subjects and symbols, to the different techniques and styles used by artists, and to the role of public and private patrons. Onsite teaching provides the incomparable experience of studying important works of art and architecture first hand. The material is approached as an introduction to the discipline of art history, with the aim of fostering appreciation and the desire to further investigate this field.
Art History I: Antiquity to Early Renaissance
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 202
FULL
Course code: ART 180 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: ART 160 L History of Western Art I
Hours: 45
Room: Verdi
Description: This course is a survey of the visual arts in Western Europe, from ancient Greece to the Early Renaissance. In this course students encounter the principal monuments, artists, and themes in painting, sculpture, and architecture, and discover the changes in styles and taste in this period. The course explores the historical, philosophical, and cultural contexts essential to understanding the visual arts and the impact they have had through the ages. Great importance is given to the interpretation of subjects and symbols, to the different techniques and styles used by artists, and to the role of public and private patrons. Onsite teaching provides the incomparable experience of studying important works of art and architecture first hand. The material is approached as an introduction to the discipline of art history, with the aim of fostering appreciation and the desire to further investigate this field.
Art History I: Antiquity to Early Renaissance
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Course code: ART 180 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: ART 160 L History of Western Art I
Hours: 45
Room: Donatello
Description: This course is a survey of the visual arts in Western Europe, from ancient Greece to the Early Renaissance. Throughout this course students encounter the principal monuments, artists and themes in painting, sculpture and architecture, and discover the changes in styles and taste in this period. The course explores the historical, philosophical and cultural contexts essential to understanding the visual arts and the impact they have had through the ages. Great importance is given to the interpretation of subjects and symbols, to the different techniques and styles used by artists, and to the role of public and private patrons. On-site teaching provides the incomparable experience of studying important works of art and architecture first-hand. The material is approached as an introduction to the discipline of art history, with the aim of fostering appreciation and the desire to further investigate this field.
Art History II: High Renaissance to the Present
MON 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: ART 186 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: ART 180 L History of Western Art II
Hours: 45
Room: Machiavelli
Description: This course is a survey of the visual arts in Western Europe, covering the early 16th century through the present. In this course students encounter the principal monuments, artists and themes in painting, sculpture and architecture, and discover the changes in styles and taste in this period. The course explores the historical, philosophical, and cultural contexts essential to understanding the visual arts and the impact they have had through the ages. Great importance is given to the interpretation of subjects and symbols, to the different techniques and styles used by artists, and to the role of public and private patrons. Onsite teaching provides the incomparable experience of studying important works of art and architecture first hand. The material is approached as an introduction to the discipline of art history, with the aim of fostering appreciation and the desire to further investigate this field.
Art History II: High Renaissance to the Present
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
OPEN
Course code: ART 186 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: ART 180 L : History of Western Art II
Hours: 45
Room: Raffaello
Description: This course is a survey of the visual arts in Western Europe, covering the early 16th century through the present. Throughout this course students encounter the principal monuments, artists and themes in painting, sculpture and architecture, and discover the changes in styles and taste in this period. The course explores the historical, philosophical and cultural contexts essential to understanding the visual arts and the impact they have had through the ages. Great importance is given to the interpretation of subjects and symbols, to the different techniques and styles used by artists, and to the role of public and private patrons. On-site teaching provides the incomparable experience of studying important works of art and architecture first-hand. The material is approached as an introduction to the discipline of art history, with the aim of fostering appreciation and the desire to further investigate this field.
Art History II: High Renaissance to the Present
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
Course code: ART 186 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: ART 180 L : History of Western Art II
Hours: 45
Room: Raffaello
Description: This course is a survey of the visual arts in Western Europe, covering the early 16th century through the present. Throughout this course students encounter the principal monuments, artists and themes in painting, sculpture and architecture, and discover the changes in styles and taste in this period. The course explores the historical, philosophical and cultural contexts essential to understanding the visual arts and the impact they have had through the ages. Great importance is given to the interpretation of subjects and symbols, to the different techniques and styles used by artists, and to the role of public and private patrons. On-site teaching provides the incomparable experience of studying important works of art and architecture first-hand. The material is approached as an introduction to the discipline of art history, with the aim of fostering appreciation and the desire to further investigate this field.
Art History II: High Renaissance to the Present
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Course code: ART 186 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: ART 180 L History of Western Art II
Hours: 45
Room: Verdi
Description: This course is a survey of the visual arts in Western Europe, covering the early 16th century through the present. In this course students encounter the principal monuments, artists and themes in painting, sculpture and architecture, and discover the changes in styles and taste in this period. The course explores the historical, philosophical, and cultural contexts essential to understanding the visual arts and the impact they have had through the ages. Great importance is given to the interpretation of subjects and symbols, to the different techniques and styles used by artists, and to the role of public and private patrons. Onsite teaching provides the incomparable experience of studying important works of art and architecture first hand. The material is approached as an introduction to the discipline of art history, with the aim of fostering appreciation, and the desire to further investigate this field.
Art History II: High Renaissance to the Present
MON to THU 1:15 PM-3:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Course code: ART 186 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: ART 180 L History of Western Art II
Hours: 45
Room: Donatello
Description: This course is a survey of the visual arts in Western Europe, covering the early 16th century through the present. In this course students encounter the principal monuments, artists and themes in painting, sculpture and architecture, and discover the changes in styles and taste in this period. The course explores the historical, philosophical, and cultural contexts essential to understanding the visual arts and the impact they have had through the ages. Great importance is given to the interpretation of subjects and symbols, to the different techniques and styles used by artists, and to the role of public and private patrons. Onsite teaching provides the incomparable experience of studying important works of art and architecture first hand. The material is approached as an introduction to the discipline of art history, with the aim of fostering appreciation, and the desire to further investigate this field.
Art in Rome, Ancient to Baroque
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: ART 192 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: ART 102 L Art in Rome, Ancient to Baroque
Hours: 45
Room: Augusto
Description: This survey of art in Rome across two millennia uses Rome itself as an extended, living museum. Students examine four broad periods when Rome was either a major creative center or a reference point: Ancient Roman art, Early Christian and Medieval art, the Renaissance, and the Baroque. About three-quarters of the classes are held onsite in churches, palaces, galleries, and piazzas, with direct experiential learning in the presence of major artworks and monuments. Special focus is given to master artists who worked in Rome, including Michelangelo, Raphael, Caravaggio, and Bernini. Students acquire the essentials of art appreciation and use the basic tools of art history to analyze the materials and making, style, meaning, and cultural context of works of painting, sculpture, and architecture.
Art in Rome, Ancient to Baroque
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
OPEN
Course code: ART 192 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: ART 102 L Art in Rome, Ancient to Baroque
Hours: 45
Room: Augusto
Description: This survey of art in Rome across two millennia uses Rome itself as an extended, living museum. Students examine four broad periods when Rome was either a major creative center or a reference point: Ancient Roman art, Early Christian and Medieval art, the Renaissance, and the Baroque. About three-quarters of the classes are held onsite in churches, palaces, galleries, and piazzas, with direct experiential learning in the presence of major artworks and monuments. Special focus is given to master artists who worked in Rome, including Michelangelo, Raphael, Caravaggio, and Bernini. Students acquire the essentials of art appreciation and use the basic tools of art history to analyze the materials and making, style, meaning, and cultural context of works of painting, sculpture, and architecture.
Art in Rome, Ancient to Baroque
MON to THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Course code: ART 192 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: ART 102 L Art in Rome, Ancient to Baroque
Hours: 45
Room: Augusto
Description: This survey of art in Rome across two millennia uses Rome itself as an extended, living museum. Students examine four broad periods when Rome was either a major creative center or a reference point: Ancient Roman art, Early Christian and Medieval art, the Renaissance, and the Baroque. About three-quarters of the classes are held onsite in churches, palaces, galleries, and piazzas, with direct experiential learning in the presence of major artworks and monuments. Special focus is given to master artists who worked in Rome, including Michelangelo, Raphael, Caravaggio, and Bernini. Students acquire the essentials of art appreciation and use the basic tools of art history to analyze the materials and making, style, meaning, and cultural context of works of painting, sculpture, and architecture.
The Built Environment of Florence
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: ART 201 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: ARCH 180 L The Built Environment of Florence
Hours: 45
Room: Donatello
Dual Listing: ARC 201 F
Description: This course will explore the factors that have led to the development of Florence, its architecture and open spaces. The construction of the city to the architecture of the 19th century will be studied from architectural and historical points of view. This course is divided into lectures in class, walking tours, visits, field trips and sketching on site, all fundamental for the understanding of the city. We will draw on the parallel history of the town of Florence to understand the growth of the city, but the main interest will be on the architecture and the way it developed. To better understand the historical development of the city, the course will also focus on the history, the artistic productions of the time, the philosophical currents and the powerful families that ruled and determined various architectural choices.
The Built Environment of Florence
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
FULL
Course code: ART 201 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: ARCH 180 L The Built Environment of Florence
Hours: 45
Room: Machiavelli
Dual Listing: ARC 201 F
Description: This course will explore the factors that have led to the development of Florence, its architecture, and open spaces. The construction of the city to the architecture of the 19th century will be studied from architectural and historical points of view. This course is divided into lectures in class, walking tours, visits, field trips, and sketching on site, all fundamental for the understanding of the city. We will draw on the parallel history of the town of Florence to understand the growth of the city, but the main interest will be on the architecture and the way it developed. To better understand the historical development of the city, the course will also focus on the history, the artistic productions of the time, the philosophical currents, and the powerful families that ruled and determined various architectural choices.
The Built Environment of Florence
MON to THU 1:15 PM-3:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Course code: ART 201 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: ARCH 180 L The Built Environment of Florence
Hours: 45
Room: Stone
Dual Listing: ARC 201 F
Description: This course will explore the factors that have led to the development of Florence, its architecture and open spaces. The construction of the city up to the architecture of the 19th century will be studied from the architectural and historical points of view. This course is divided into lectures in class, walking tours, visits, field trips and sketching on site, all fundamental for the understanding of the city. We will draw on the parallel history of the town of Florence to understand the growth of the city, but the main interest will be on the architecture and the way it developed. To better understand the historical development of the city the course will also focus on the history, the artistic productions of the time, the philosophical currents and the powerful families that ruled and determined different architectural choices.
20th Century Design and Architecture
WED 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: ART 202 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: ITDS 150 / ARCH 140 L History of Interior Design
Hours: 45
Room: Caravaggio
Dual Listing: ARC 202 F
Description: The aim of the course is to give the students the instruments and methodology to understand and recognize interior design styles. During the lessons the students will become familiar with the work of the outstanding masters that often applied their talents to the small scale (object or interior design) as well as to the large one (architecture) from the mid-19th century to 1960. Because interior design is so strongly related to object design and architecture, the course analyses the history of these three fields as a whole, from the industrial revolution to the present time, by studying the influence of society, art, economy, political events, scientific, and technological discoveries. The course provides students with the tools to understand innovative elements introduced by a new trend and to remain up-to-date in this ever-changing field.
20th Century Design and Architecture
THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Course code: ART 202 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: ITDS 150 / ARCH 140 L History of Interior Design
Hours: 45
Room: Marconi
Dual Listing: ARC 202 F
Description: The aim of the course is to give the students the instruments and methodology to understand and recognize interior design styles. During the lessons the students will become familiar with the work of the outstanding masters that often applied their talents to the small scale (object or interior design) as well as to the large one (architecture) from the mid-19th century to 1960. Because interior design is so strongly related to object design and architecture, the course analyses the history of these three fields as a whole, from the industrial revolution to the present time, by studying the influence of society, art, economy, political events, scientific, and technological discoveries. The course provides students with the tools to understand innovative elements introduced by a new trend and to remain up-to-date in this ever-changing field.
The World of Museums: Museology
WED 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: ART 230 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: ART 290 L World of Museums
Hours: 45
Room: Fellini
Description: The aim of this course is to provide an integrated approach to museum theory and practice. It will consider museum definitions and classification, and the centuries-long history of art collecting, examining the various forms and meanings of gathering beautiful, precious, or even curious objects in various places, including the creation of world-famous museums such as the Uffizi or the Louvre. The concept of cultural heritage will be analyzed, considering its increasing value for society, as well as the legal and ethical issues involved. The course will also analyze such topics as research, methods of documentation, cataloging, display, basic communication techniques, the importance of education and learning in museums, preventive and remedial conservation of collections, environmental monitoring and control, safety plans, and storage systems. Most stress is given to the Italian and more specifically the Florentine situation with regards to museums, which students will be invited to analyze according to most recent museological and museographical theories.
The World of Museums: Museology
WED 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
OPEN
Course code: ART 230 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: ART 290 L World of Museums
Hours: 45
Room: Donatello
Description: The aim of this course is to provide an integrated approach to museum theory and practice. It will consider museum definitions and classification, and centuries-long history of art collecting, examining the various forms and meanings of gathering beautiful, precious, or even curious objects in various places, including the creation of world-famous museums, such as the Uffizi and the Louvre. The concept of cultural heritage will be analyzed, considering its increasing value for society, as well as the legal and ethical issues involved. The course will also analyze such topics as research, methods of documentation, cataloging, display, basic communication techniques, the importance of education and learning in museums, preventive and remedial conservation of collections, environmental monitoring and control, safety plans, and storage systems. Stress is given to the Italian and more specifically Florentine situation with regards to museums, which students will be invited to analyze according to the most recent museological and museographical theories.
Palaces of Florence
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
FULL
Course code: ART 245 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 210 L Palaces of Florence
Hours: 45
Room: Donatello
Description: The aim of this course is to introduce students to the history of the palaces of Florence from the 13th to the 17th century. Public and private palaces played an important role in the life of the city through the centuries, and, by studying them, students will have the opportunity to understand not only the development of their architectural style, but also the social, economic, cultural, and political history of Florence, in an interdisciplinary approach to the subject. Students will study the evolution of Florentine palaces directly in front, and inside, of the buildings: Many of the lessons will be held on site, and site visits form a crucial dimension to the learning experience.
Palaces of Florence
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 102
FULL
Course code: ART 245 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 210 L Palaces of Florence
Hours: 45
Room: Marco Polo
Description: The aim of this course is to introduce students to the history of the palaces of Florence from the 13th to the 17th century. Public and private palaces played an important role in the life of the city through the centuries, and, by studying them, students will have the opportunity to understand not only the development of their architectural style, but also the social, economic, cultural, and political history of Florence, in an interdisciplinary approach to the subject. Students will study the evolution of Florentine palaces directly in front, and inside, of the buildings: Many of the lessons will be held on site, and site visits form a crucial dimension to the learning experience.
Palaces of Florence
WED 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 103
FULL
Course code: ART 245 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 210 L Palaces of Florence
Hours: 45
Room: Galileo
Description: The aim of this course is to introduce students to the history of the palaces of Florence from the 13th to the 17th century. Public and private palaces played an important role in the life of the city through the centuries, and, by studying them, students will have the opportunity to understand not only the development of their architectural style, but also the social, economic, cultural, and political history of Florence, in an interdisciplinary approach to the subject. Students will study the evolution of Florentine palaces directly in front, and inside, of the buildings. Many of the lessons will be held on site, and site visits form a crucial dimension of the learning experience.
Palaces of Florence
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 104
FULL
Course code: ART 245 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 210 L Palaces of Florence
Hours: 45
Room: Galileo
Description: The aim of this course is to introduce students to the history of the palaces of Florence from the 13th to the 17th century. Public and private palaces played an important role in the life of the city through the centuries, and, by studying them, students will have the opportunity to understand not only the development of their architectural style, but also the social, economic, cultural, and political history of Florence, in an interdisciplinary approach to the subject. Students will study the evolution of Florentine palaces directly in front, and inside, of the buildings: Many of the lessons will be held on site, and site visits form a crucial dimension to the learning experience.
Palaces of Florence
MON to FRI 2:00 PM-4:45 PM
Section: 401
OPEN
Course code: ART 245 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 210 L Palaces of Florence
Hours: 42
Room: Fellini
Description: The aim of this course is to introduce students to the history of the palaces of Florence from the 13th to the 17th century. Public and private palaces played an important role in the life of the city through the centuries, and, by studying them, students will have the opportunity to understand not only the development of their architectural style, but also the social, economic, cultural, and political history of Florence, in an interdisciplinary approach to the subject. Students will study the evolution of Florentine palaces directly in front, and inside, of the buildings. Many of the lessons will be held on site, and site visits form a crucial dimension of the learning experience.
Palaces of Florence
WED 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
FULL
Course code: ART 245 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 210 L Palaces of Florence
Hours: 45
Room: Caravaggio
Description: The aim of this course is to introduce students to the history of the palaces of Florence from 13th to 17th centuries. Public and private palaces had an important role in the life of the city through the centuries, and, by studying them, students will have the opportunity to understand not only the development of their architectural style, but also the social, economic, cultural, and political history of Florence, in an interdisciplinary approach to the subject. Students will study the evolution of Florentine palaces directly in front, and inside, of the buildings: many of the lessons will be held on site, and site visits form a crucial dimension of the learning experience.
Palaces of Florence
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 202
FULL
Course code: ART 245 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 210 L Palaces of Florence
Hours: 45
Room: Leonardo
Description: The aim of this course is to introduce students to the history of the palaces of Florence from 13th to 17th centuries. Public and private palaces had an important role in the life of the city through the centuries, and, by studying them, students will have the opportunity to understand not only the development of their architectural style, but also the social, economic, cultural, and political history of Florence, in an interdisciplinary approach to the subject. Students will study the evolution of Florentine palaces directly in front, and inside, of the buildings: many of the lessons will be held on site, and site visits form a crucial dimension of the learning experience.
Palaces of Florence
WED 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 203
FULL
Course code: ART 245 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 210 L Palaces of Florence
Hours: 45
Room: Verdi
Description: The aim of this course is to introduce students to the history of the palaces of Florence from the 13th to the 17th century. Public and private palaces played an important role in the life of the city through the centuries, and, by studying them, students will have the opportunity to understand not only the development of their architectural style, but also the social, economic, cultural, and political history of Florence, in an interdisciplinary approach to the subject. Students will study the evolution of Florentine palaces directly in front, and inside, of the buildings. Many of the lessons will be held on site, and site visits form a crucial dimension of the learning experience.
Palaces of Florence
MON 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 204
FULL
Course code: ART 245 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 210 L Palaces of Florence
Hours: 45
Room: Tiziano
Description: The aim of this course is to introduce students to the history of the palaces of Florence from the 13th to the 17th century. Public and private palaces played an important role in the life of the city through the centuries, and, by studying them, students will have the opportunity to understand not only the development of their architectural style, but also the social, economic, cultural, and political history of Florence, in an interdisciplinary approach to the subject. Students will study the evolution of Florentine palaces directly in front, and inside, of the buildings. Many of the lessons will be held on site, and site visits form a crucial dimension of the learning experience.
Palaces of Florence
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 205
FULL
Course code: ART 245 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 210 L Palaces of Florence
Hours: 45
Room: Verdi
Description: The aim of this course is to introduce students to the history of the palaces of Florence from the 13th to the 17th century. Public and private palaces played an important role in the life of the city through the centuries, and, by studying them, students will have the opportunity to understand not only the development of their architectural style, but also the social, economic, cultural, and political history of Florence, in an interdisciplinary approach to the subject. Students will study the evolution of Florentine palaces directly in front, and inside, of the buildings. Many of the lessons will be held on site, and site visits form a crucial dimension of the learning experience.
Palaces of Florence
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 206
FULL
Course code: ART 245 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 210 L Palaces of Florence
Hours: 45
Room: Fellini
Description: The aim of this course is to introduce students to the history of the palaces of Florence from the 13th to the 17th century. Public and private palaces played an important role in the life of the city through the centuries, and, by studying them, students will have the opportunity to understand not only the development of their architectural style, but also the social, economic, cultural, and political history of Florence, in an interdisciplinary approach to the subject. Students will study the evolution of Florentine palaces directly in front, and inside, of the buildings. Many of the lessons will be held on site, and site visits form a crucial dimension of the learning experience.
Palaces of Florence
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Course code: ART 245 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 210 L Palaces of Florence
Hours: 45
Room: Machiavelli
Description: The aim of this course is to introduce students to the history of the palaces of Florence from the 13th to the 17th century. Public and private palaces played an important role in the life of the city through the centuries, and, by studying them, students will have the opportunity to understand not only the development of their architectural style, but also the social, economic, cultural, and political history of Florence, in an interdisciplinary approach to the subject. Students will study the evolution of Florentine palaces directly in front, and inside, of the buildings. Many of the lessons will be held on site, and site visits form a crucial dimension of the learning experience.
Palaces of Florence
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Course code: ART 245 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 210 L: Palaces of Florence
Hours: 45
Room: Machiavelli
Description: The aim of this course is to introduce students to the history of the palaces of Florence from 13th to 17th centuries. Public and private palaces had an important role in the life of the city through the centuries, and, by studying them, students will have the opportunity to understand not only the development of their architectural style, but also the social, economic, cultural, and political history of Florence, in an interdisciplinary approach to the subject. Students will study the evolution of Florentine palaces directly in front, and inside, of the buildings: many of the lessons will be held on site, and site visits form a crucial dimension of the learning experience.
Palaces of Rome
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: ART 246 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 211 L Palaces of Rome
Hours: 45
Room: Augusto
Description: This course introduces students to the history of the palaces and also selected villas of Rome from the fifteenth to the eighteenth centuries. Since public and private palaces had an important role in the life of the city through the centuries, by studying them students have the opportunity to understand not only the development of architectural styles, but also the social, economic, cultural, and political history of Rome,using an interdisciplinary approach to the subject. Works by major architects including Michelangelo, Bramante, and Bernini are examined, and issues such as building function, typology, sources, and urban design are addressed. Site visits form a crucial dimension of the learning experience, and permit students to study the evolution of Roman urban palaces and villas directly before, and inside, a series of representative buildings.
Palaces of Rome
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
OPEN
Course code: ART 246 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 211 L Palaces of Rome
Hours: 45
Room: Augusto
Description: This course introduces students to the history of the palaces and also selected villas of Rome from the fifteenth to the eighteenth centuries. Since public and private palaces had an important role in the life of the city through the centuries, by studying them students have the opportunity to understand not only the development of architectural style, but also the social, economic, cultural, and political history of Rome, in an interdisciplinary approach to the subject. Works by major architects including Michelangelo, Bramante and Bernini are examined, and issues such as building function, typology, sources, and urban design are addressed. Site visits form a crucial dimension of the learning experience, and permit students to study the evolution of Roman urban palaces and villas directly before, and inside of, a series of representative buildings.
Palaces of Rome
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Course code: ART 246 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 211 L Palaces of Rome
Hours: 48
Room: Augusto
Description: This course introduces students to the history of the palaces and also selected villas of Rome from the fifteenth to the eighteenth centuries. Since public and private palaces had an important role in the life of the city through the centuries, by studying them students have the opportunity to understand not only the development of architectural style, but also the social, economic, cultural, and political history of Rome, in an interdisciplinary approach to the subject. Works by major architects including Michelangelo, Bramante and Bernini are examined, and issues such as building function, typology, sources, and urban design are addressed. Site visits form a crucial dimension of the learning experience, and permit students to study the evolution of Roman urban palaces and villas directly before, and inside of, a series of representative buildings.
Lost Symbolism: Secret Codes in Western Art
MON 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: ART 255 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: ART 225 L Lost Symbolisms and Secret Codes in Art
Hours: 45
Room: Stone
Description: The course focuses on the links between artworks and astrology, alchemy, geometry, numerology, and selected philosophical themes in Western art between 1300 and 1800. Art has served various functional and aesthetic purposes in different cultures and periods. In some eras art has also embodied a symbolic language, mysterious to the majority, but highly significant to the minority able to read or decode it. For example, what we may call the secret messages of certain paintings and sculptures of past centuries can be interpreted in terms of astrology. A specific field of art history, iconography, studies subject matter, symbolism, and signification in works of art. Students use elements of this approach to examine the fascinating and complex range of meanings that some artworks were intended to transmit and which can still be uncovered.
Lost Symbolism: Secret Codes in Western Art
WED 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
OPEN
Course code: ART 255 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: ART 225 L Lost Symbolisms and Secret Codes in Art
Hours: 45
Room: Dante
Description: The course focuses on the links between artworks and astrology, alchemy, geometry, numerology, and selected philosophical themes in Western art between 1300 and 1800. Art has served various functional and aesthetic purposes in different cultures and periods. In some eras art has also embodied a symbolic language, mysterious to the majority, but highly significant to the minority able to read or decode it. For example, what we may call the secret messages of certain paintings and sculptures of past centuries can be interpreted in terms of astrology. A specific field of art history, iconography, studies subject matter, symbolism, and signification in works of art. Students use elements of this approach to examine the fascinating and complex range of meanings that some artworks were intended to transmit and which can still be uncovered.
Renaissance Art at the Italian Courts
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
OPEN
Course code: ART 276 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: ART 276 L Renaissance Art at the Italian Courts
Hours: 45
Room: Dante
Description: This course explores all aspects of artistic activity at the major Italian courts during the fifteenth century. This analysis will not only be confined to an art historical approach, but will also consider various aspects of court life - the chivalric tradition, hunting, jousting, scholarship, and court festivals - which influenced the visual arts. Comparisons will be made with Northern European courts of the same period. The main focus will be on Pisanello and the courts of Ferrara and the Gonzaga court in Mantua, Mantegna and the Gonzaga court in Mantua, Francesco Cossa at the D'Este court in Ferrara, Piero della Francesca and Laurana at the court of Federico da Montefeltro in Urbino, and Piero della Francesca and Alberti at the Malatesta court in Rimini. The students will become familiar with the special patronage conditions which dictated the nature of Renaissance art at the princely courts of Italy and acquire a detailed knowledge of the work of five court artists as well as a broader familiarity with three others.
Renaissance Art at the Italian Courts
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Course code: ART 276 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: ART 276 L Renaissance Art at the Italian Courts
Hours: 45
Room: Stone
Description: This course explores all aspects of artistic activity at the major Italian courts during the fifteenth century. This analysis will not only be confined to an art historical approach, but will also consider various aspects of court life - the chivalric tradition, hunting, jousting, scholarship, and court festivals - which influenced the visual arts. Comparisons will be made with Northern European courts of the same period. The main focus will be on Pisanello and the courts of Ferrara and the Gonzaga court in Mantua, Mantegna and the Gonzaga court in Mantua, Francesco Cossa at the D'Este court in Ferrara, Piero della Francesca and Laurana at the court of Federico da Montefeltro in Urbino, and Piero della Francesca and Alberti at the Malatesta court in Rimini. The students will become familiar with the special patronage conditions which dictated the nature of Renaissance art at the princely courts of Italy and acquire a detailed knowledge of the work of five court artists as well as a broader familiarity with three others.
Renaissance Art at the Italian Courts
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Course code: ART 276 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: ART 276 L: Renaissance Art at the Italian Courts
Hours: 45
Room: Fellini
Description: This course explores all aspects of artistic activity at the major Italian courts during the fifteenth century. This analysis will not only be confined to an art historical approach, but will also consider various aspects of court life - the chivalric tradition, hunting, jousting, scholarship, and court festivals - which influenced the visual arts. Comparisons will be made with Northern European courts of the same period. The main focus will be on Pisanello and the courts of Ferrara and the Gonzaga court in Mantua, Mantegna and the Gonzaga court in Mantua, Francesco Cossa at the D'Este court in Ferrara, Piero della Francesca and Laurana at the court of Federico da Montefeltro in Urbino, and Piero della Francesca and Alberti at the Malatesta court in Rimini. The students will become familiar with the special patronage conditions which dictated the nature of Renaissance art at the princely courts of Italy and acquire a detailed knowledge of the work of five court artists as well as a broader familiarity with three others.
Visual Culture in Italy Since 1945 (Art, Design, Media)
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Course code: ART 277 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: ART 294 L ART: Special Topics
Hours: 45
Room: Caravaggio
Dual Listing: COM 277 F
Description: Does a significant thread link a Vespa scooter, Vittorio De Sica's Neo-Realist movies, Gucci’s bamboo bag, Gio Ponti’s “Superleggera” chair, Giuseppe Cavalli photographs of “trulli” buildings, and Alberto Burri’s “Catrame” canvases? Our working hypothesis is that it is a common visual culture, with elements of national identity, plus uniquely Italian interconnections between fields and disciplines in the creative and productive processes. Students will test this claim by applying a communications-based approach to the whole of Italian visual culture of the period following World War II. We will view works of contemporary art and design as communicators and carriers of cultural messages. This blurs the sometimes artificial distinction between visual arts (sculpture, painting, conceptual art, film, photography) and design (urban planning, architecture; interior, furniture, and industrial design, graphics, and fashion). Students explore selected case studies in which a designer, film director, or artist may have influenced each other or actually interacted. Theory takes a back seat to process and context, but is not ignored. Students learn to “read” a particularly rich, diverse, and complex visual culture – often in the vanguard and the originator of global “icons.” Students also learn concrete ways to innovate by adopting an interdisciplinary approach.
Italian Renaissance Art
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: ART 180 Art History I, or ART 186 Art History II, or equivalent
Course code: ART 278 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: ART 380 L Renaissance Art
Hours: 45
Room: Marco Polo
Description: Florence, "the cradle of the Renaissance," is the setting for this introduction to the history of Renaissance art. The course is intended to give the beginning student a general overview of the main facts, causes, and conditions that led artists from Giotto in the fourteenth century to Masaccio, Donatello, Brunelleschi and Botticelli in the fifteenth century, to Leonardo, Michelangelo and Raphael in the sixteenth century, to create one of the most fascinating periods in the history of art. In Italy these years witnessed an extraordinary coming together of artistic talent, a passionate interest in antiquity, civic pride and an optimistic belief in "man as the measure of all things." This course examines the most important monuments from the Renaissance period in Italy and the major artists and architects who contributed to the rebirth of western art. Works are always compared with each other to show various relationships, remembering how important it is to view Renaissance art in the context of its creation.
Lifestyle in Renaissance Florence
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
FULL
Course code: ART 280 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: ART 275 L Lifestyle in Renaissance Florence
Hours: 45
Room: Galileo
Dual Listing: HIS 280 F
Description: This course examines the social, economical, political, and artistic life of Florence and its close relationship to the fortunes (and misfortunes) of a group of notable Florentine families, such as the Medici, Rucellai, Strozzi, and Pitti, through the analysis of art works and objects, including wedding chests and other furniture, ceramics, jewelry, luxury clothing, and coats of arms. A study of these families, their history, their public and private lives, will help illustrate and uncover many significant characteristics of the city, not only in the past, but also today, as some of these families are still active in the social, political, and economic life of Florence.
Lifestyle in Renaissance Florence
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Course code: ART 280 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: ART 275 L Lifestyle in Renaissance Florence
Hours: 45
Room: Caravaggio
Dual Listing: HIS 280 F
Description: This course examines the social, economic, political, and artistic life of Florence and its close relationship to the fortunes (and misfortunes) of a group of notable Florentine families, such as the Medici, Rucellai, Strozzi, and Pitti, through the analysis of art works and objects, including wedding chests and other furniture, ceramics, jewelry, luxury clothing, and coats of arms. A study of these families, their history, their public and private lives, will help illustrate and uncover many significant characteristics of the city, not only in the past, but also today, as some of these families are still active in the social, political, and economic life of Florence.
Contemporary Architecture
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: ART 165 History of Architecture, or equivalent
Course code: ART 286 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: ARCH 120 L Contemporary Architecture
Hours: 45
Room: Caravaggio
Dual Listing: ARC 286 F
Description: This course examines major developments in architecture, interior design and planning from 1960 to the present. Special focus is given to developments of the last two decades. The survey includes consideration of sociocultural developments, as well as debates in aesthetics and theory, such as the decline of Modernism. Key architects and studios are examined. The perspective is global, but with an emphasis on European and, especially, Italian.
Contemporary Architecture
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: ART 165 History of Architecture, or equivalent
Course code: ART 286 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: ARCH 120 L Contemporary Architecture
Hours: 45
Room: Marco Polo
Dual Listing: ARC 286 F
Description: This course examines major developments in architecture, interior design and planning from 1960 to the present. Special focus is given to developments of the last two decades. The survey includes consideration of sociocultural developments, as well as debates in aesthetics and theory, such as the decline of Modernism. Key architects and studios are examined. The perspective is global but European and Italian figures, movements, works and events are not ignored.
Leonardo: The Renaissance Genius at Work
MON to THU 4:15 PM-6:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: ART 180 Art History I, or ART 186 Art History II, or equivalents
Course code: ART 295 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: ART 332 L Leonardo da Vinci
Hours: 45
Room: Donatello
Description: Leonardo da Vinci, more than anyone else, represents Renaissance confidence in the boundless faculties of the human mind. Largely self-educated, driven by curiosity, and gifted with an extraordinary capacity for observation, he tried to explain numerous phenomena in several disciplines, such as anatomy, hydraulics, geography, astronomy, botany, mechanics, optics. Equally important is his work as an artist. His refined painting style and his projects with regards to fresco painting and bronze casting were innovative. His writings, such as his Book on Painting, help us to understand his creative process. The course will cover the breadth and variety of Leonardo's artistic and scientific interests, highlighting his ability to transfer visual analogies from one field of research to another. His personal artistic interpretations of traditional subjects will also be studied. Thus, students will understand Leonardo’s unique genius as artist, scientist, and inventor.
International Art Business
THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: ART 180 Art History I, or ART 186 Art History II, or equivalents
Course code: ART 297 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: ART 318 N International Art Business
Hours: 45
Room: Galileo
Dual Listing: BUS 290 F
Description: The course is designed to introduce students to the art market and the institutional networks that support and promote the art business, as well as giving them an understanding of the current art market and auction house environment. Through this course, students will meet specialists in order to develop the ability to identify and analyze works of art, learn how to recognize marketing opportunities, and determine appropriate strategies. The roles of the art dealer and the art administrator will be analyzed in depth, together with the main principles of the international laws that govern this particular field.
International Art Business
THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: ART 180 Art History I, or ART 186 Art History II, or equivalents
Course code: ART 297 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: ART 318 N International Art Business
Hours: 45
Room: Fellini
Dual Listing: BUS 290 F
Description: The course is designed to introduce students to the arts market and the institutional networks that support and promote the art business, as well as giving them an understanding of the current art market and auction house environment. Through this course, students will meet specialists to develop the ability to identify and analyze works of art, learn how to recognize marketing opportunities, and determine appropriate strategies. The figures of the art dealer and the art administrator will be analyzed in depth, together with the main principles of the international laws that govern this special field.
Art in 14th Century Florence
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: ART 180 Art History I, or equivalent
Course code: ART 305 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title:
Hours: 45
Room: Dante
Description: Intensive study of the visual arts in Trecento Florence, with some attention to other artistic centers such as Siena and Padua. The course examines major monuments and artists including Giotto, but with particular focus on patronage and socio-cultural contexts, and on the interrelationship among the arts. The extraordinary growth that took place in Italian art between 1290 and 1420 was connected to important developments in society and the humanities, and in both respects Florence is exemplary. Factors including the rise of the mendicant orders, the affirmation of the commune or municipality, and private wealth generated by the wool-trade and banking, directly encouraged artistic patronage and changed the role of the artist. While many civic and monastic commissions altered the physical aspect of Florence in important ways, private commissions in the form of palaces, chapels, and altarpieces served spiritual as well as family needs. A premise of the course is that in many cases artworks combine painting, sculpture, and even architecture, in ensembles. For this reason, many lessons involve direct observation of works “in situ,” in their unique physical contexts.
Hidden Meanings in Renaissance Art
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: ART 180 Art History I, or ART 186 Art History II, or equivalent
Course code: ART 320 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: ART 316 L Hidden Meaning in Renaissance Art
Hours: 45
Room: Donatello
Description: This course introduces students to the richness and complexity of Renaissance art, focusing mainly on iconography and iconology. The students will learn how to understand and center works of art in the religious, classical, and humanistic contexts of the 15th and 16th centuries. The course will examine a wide range of art forms (paintings, sculptures, medals, tapestries), and artists from southern and northern Europe (including Jan Van Eyck, Piero della Francesca, Sandro Botticelli, Michelangelo, Holbein, Mantegna, Lotto, Raphael, Cranach, and Dürer). We will address the meanings of works of art divided into broad categories of portraiture and patronage, and mythological and religious subjects, through a series of case studies. Renaissance figurative art is full of hidden meanings, which the class will attempt to uncover.
Crossroads of Faith: The Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Heritage of Rome
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: Junior standing and ART 180 Art History I or ART 186 Art History II or equivalents
Notes: In collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ART 348 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: ART 248 L Crossroads of Faith
Hours: 45
Room: Traiano
Dual Listing: HIS 348 R
Description: This course proposes an itinerary from Late Antiquity to Contemporaneity focusing on the artistic production and historical interactions pertinent to non-Catholic religious groups in Rome. It is intended to give students an overview of the main artistic and urbanistic achievements regarding the Jewish community, but also, to a lesser extent, of some of the production relevant to Eastern Christians, Protestants and Muslims. Classes are designed to offer an alternative perspective on the Eternal City, mostly perceived as the cradle of Catholicism. Lessons will cover a range of different topics, such as the analysis of artifacts and texts (manuscripts, prints, textiles, but also legends, midrashim, oral accounts), and it will also include the study of various sites, both thanks to documentary sources (lost buildings, destroyed churches), and through on-site visits (Ghetto, Synagogue, Jewish Museum, Non-Catholic Cemetery, monuments to Giordano Bruno and Giuseppe Garibaldi).
Crossroads of Faith: The Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Heritage of Rome
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: Junior standing and ART 180 Art History I or ART 186 Art History II or equivalents
Notes: In collaboration with CAMNES
Course code: ART 348 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: ART 248 L Crossroads of Faith
Hours: 48
Room: Tito
Dual Listing: HIS 348 R
Description: This course proposes an itinerary from Late Antiquity to Contemporaneity focusing on the artistic production and historical interactions pertinent to non-Catholic religious groups in Rome. It is intended to give students an overview of the main artistic and urbanistic achievements regarding the Jewish community, but also, to a lesser extent, of some of the production relevant to Eastern Christians, Protestants and Muslims. Classes are designed to offer an alternative perspective on the Eternal City, mostly perceived as the cradle of Catholicism. Lessons will cover a range of different topics, such as the analysis of artifacts and texts (manuscripts, prints, textiles, but also legends, midrashim, oral accounts), and it will also include the study of various sites, both thanks to documentary sources (lost buildings, destroyed churches), and through on-site visits (Ghetto, Synagogue, Jewish Museum, Non-Catholic Cemetery, monuments to Giordano Bruno and Giuseppe Garibaldi).
Italian Contemporary Art
MON to THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: ART 180 Art History I, or ART 186 Art History II, or equivalent
Course code: ART 353 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: ARTL 311 L Italian Contemporary Art
Hours: 45
Room: TBA
Description: The course focuses on Italian art of the 1950s, ‘60s, ‘70s, and ‘80s analyzing movements and artists whose work represents a dialogue with international developments, from Abstraction to Informale, from Arte Povera to Transavanguardia. The course is divided into a first part analyzing movements and artists, and a second part examining places and personalities representative of the experience of Italian Modern Art. Artists studied include Renato Guttuso, Renato Schifano, Mimmo Paladino, and Francesco Clemente. The course has a specific focus on Rome as a city of uninterrupted exchange with other Italian centers (such as Milan, Naples, Turin) and the international panorama, thanks also to gallery owners and critics such as Ugo Ferranti, Mario Pieroni, Fabio Sargentini (who introduced American artists and Conceptual art), Germano Celant, and Achille Bonito Oliva, and to major international exhibitions such as Contemporanea and Vitalità del Negativo.
Images and Words
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: 1) Junior standing; 2) ART 186 Art History II, or equivalent
Course code: ART 355 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: ART 477 L : Capping: Images and Words
Hours: 45
Room: Fellini
Description: In this interdisciplinary course different disciplines converge to enhance students’ skills as readers of visual as well as verbal texts. It aims to open up new ways of seeing and perceiving works of art by exploring the relationship between us (spectators and/or creators), images and words, involving questions, such as: What is art? Where do we see art? How do we look at art? What words do we use while talking about a work of art, explaining and/or describing it? Can we “read” images? Can we “see” stories? Students analyze a selection of fundamental theoretical texts and produce close examinations of visual and written works, including narrative prose, and poetry. Students have the opportunity to become active spectators who, through activities of observing, reading, sketching, and writing, experience different modes of looking at art while learning about art theory, art history, literature, museum culture, and sociology.
Museum and Gallery Internship
-
Section: 101
FULL
Prerequisites: 1) Art History / Museum Studies majors of sophomore standing; 2) Concurrent enrollment in a course in the same field; 3) Fluency in Italian is advantageous, but is not required
Notes: min. 135 hrs INTERNSHIP. Placement opportunities are limited, especially for students who lack Italian language skills. Admission contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, formal letter of intent (due by application deadline), onsite interview and Italian language placement test. Final placement may be determined upon Italian language ability. Student taking an internship must retain full-time status, with a minimum of 15 credits per semester.
Course code: ART 360 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: TBA
Marist Code/Title: ART 266 L Museum Experience
Hours: 135
Room: External
Description: This internship entails individual work experience in a museum, gallery or church in the Florentine area, supervised by a faculty member and the cooperating museum, or Florentine curia staff. The internship provides students with practical experience, especially in the field of cultural mediation and museum education, through direct observation of the various activities developed at the hosting museums and churches, individual study and direct participation in guided tours at museums and churches, collections management in art galleries. Through this experience students have the opportunity to learn and apply professional skills, while directly interacting with institutional staff and the visitors. The intern is monitored by both the onsite supervisor and an LdM faculty member. The grade assigned by the faculty internship supervisor reflects assessment of weekly reports, two papers, and an overall evaluation. Ten/twelve hours weekly at the internship site; student internship schedules and onsite duties may vary. Please note that the Museum and Gallery internship requires interns to fulfill part of their internship hours on Saturdays. Note: Placement opportunities are limited, especially for students without Italian language skills. Admission is also contingent upon the student's CV, two reference letters, a formal letter of intent. Students who enroll must submit supporting documentation by the application deadline, and acceptance is conditional upon the result of an onsite interview during the first week of the term and an Italian language placement test.
Museum and Gallery Internship
-
Section: 102
FULL
Prerequisites: 1) Art History / Museum Studies majors of sophomore standing; 2) Concurrent enrollment in a course in the same field; 3) Fluency in Italian is advantageous, but is not required
Notes: min. 135 hrs INTERNSHIP. Student taking an internship must retain full-time status, with a minimum of 15 credits per semester.
Course code: ART 360 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: TBA
Marist Code/Title: ART 266 L Museum Experience
Hours: 135
Room: External
Description: This internship entails individual work experience in a museum, gallery or church in the Florentine area, supervised by a faculty member and the cooperating museum, or Florentine curia staff. The internship provides students with practical experience, especially in the field of cultural mediation and museum education, through direct observation of the various activities developed at the hosting museums and churches, individual study and direct participation in guided tours at museums and churches, collections management in art galleries. Through this experience students have the opportunity to learn and apply professional skills, while directly interacting with institutional staff and the visitors. The intern is monitored by both the onsite supervisor and an LdM faculty member. The grade assigned by the faculty internship supervisor reflects assessment of weekly reports, two papers, and an overall evaluation. Ten/twelve hours weekly at the internship site; student internship schedules and onsite duties may vary. Please note that the Museum and Gallery internship requires interns to fulfill part of their internship hours on Saturdays. Note: Placement opportunities are limited, especially for students without Italian language skills. Admission is also contingent upon the student's CV, two reference letters, a formal letter of intent. Students who enroll must submit supporting documentation by the application deadline, and acceptance is conditional upon the result of an onsite interview during the first week of the term and an Italian language placement test.
Museum and Gallery Internship
-
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: 1) Art History / Museum Studies majors of sophomore standing; 2) Concurrent enrollment in a course in the same field; 3) Fluency in Italian is advantageous, but is not required
Notes: min. 135 hrs INTERNSHIP. Placement opportunities are limited, especially for students who lack Italian language skills. Admission contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, formal letter of intent (due by application deadline), onsite interview and Italian language placement test. Final placement may be determined upon Italian language ability. Student taking an internship must retain full-time status, with a minimum of 15 credits per semester.
Course code: ART 360 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: TBA
Marist Code/Title: ART 266 L Museum Experience
Hours: 135
Room: External
Description: This internship entails individual work experience in a museum, gallery or church in the Florentine area, supervised by a faculty member and the cooperating museum, or Florentine curia staff. The internship provides students with practical experience, especially in the field of cultural mediation and museum education, through direct observation of the various activities developed at the hosting museums and churches, individual study and direct participation in guided tours at museums and churches, collections management in art galleries. Through this experience students have the opportunity to learn and apply professional skills, while directly interacting with institutional staff and the visitors. The intern is monitored by both the onsite supervisor and an LdM faculty member. The grade assigned by the faculty internship supervisor reflects assessment of weekly reports, two papers, and an overall evaluation. Ten/twelve hours weekly at the internship site; student internship schedules and onsite duties may vary. Please note that the Museum and Gallery internship requires interns to fulfill part of their internship hours on Saturdays. Note: Placement opportunities are limited, especially for students without Italian language skills. Admission is also contingent upon the student's CV, two reference letters, a formal letter of intent. Students who enroll must submit supporting documentation by the application deadline, and acceptance is conditional upon the result of an onsite interview during the first week of the term and an Italian language placement test.
Museum and Gallery Internship
-
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: 1) Art History / Museum Studies majors of sophomore standing; 2) Concurrent enrollment in a course in the same field. Fluency in Italian may be advantageous, but is not required
Notes: min. 135 hrs INTERNSHIP. Placement opportunities are limited. Admission contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, formal letter of intent (due by application deadline) and on-site interview. Student taking an internship must retain full-time status, with a minimum of 15 credits per semester.
Course code: ART 360 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: ART 266 L Museum Experience
Hours: 135
Room: External
Description: This internship entails individual work experience in a museum, gallery or church in the Rome area, supervised by a faculty member and the cooperating museum, or curia staff. The internship provides students with practical experience, especially in the field of cultural mediation and museum education, through direct observation of the various activities developed at the hosting museums and churches, individual study and direct participation in guided tours at museums and churches, gallery management in art galleries. Through this experience students have the opportunity to learn and apply professional skills, while directly interacting with institutional staff and the visitors. The intern is monitored by both the onsite supervisor and an LdM faculty member. The grade assigned by the faculty internship supervisor reflects the assessment of weekly reports, two papers, and an overall evaluation. Ten/twelve hours weekly at the internship site; student internship schedules and onsite duties may vary. Please note that the Museum and Gallery internship requires interns to fulfill part of their internship hours on Saturdays. Note: Placement opportunities are limited and subject to change. Admission is contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, a formal letter of intent. Students who enroll must submit supporting documentation by the application deadline, and acceptance is conditional upon the result of an onsite interview during the first week of the term.
19th Century Art: From Neoclassicism to Post-Impressionism
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: ART 180 Art History I, or ART 186 Art History II, or equivalents
Course code: ART 365 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: ART 365 L History of 19th Century Art
Hours: 45
Room: Galileo
Description: This course examines European art between c.1790 and c.1900. The start of this period corresponds to the passage from Neoclassicism to Romanticism, while the end corresponds to movements including Post-Impressionism that heralded the avant-gardes of the Twentieth Century. The Nineteenth Century was an era of enormous changes of many kinds (from politics to technology) in European society, and links between society, ideology, culture and the visual arts are explored. Themes explored include: critics and the public; exhibitions and salons; naturalism and realism; nationalism; Orientalism and Japonisme; nature and landscape; Impressionism; dreams and inspiration; heroism; literary and historical themes. Special focus is given to changing notions of modernity. Artists studied include David, Goya, Delacroix, Turner, Courbet, Monet, Degas, Van Gogh, Cezanne, Seurat, Gauguin, Ensor, and Munch. Attention is also given to Italian artists and movements.
Avant-Garde and Modernist Art (1900-1950)
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: ART 186 Art History II, or equivalent
Course code: ART 370 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: ART 366 L: History of 20th Century Art
Hours: 45
Room: Machiavelli
Description: Investigation of modern art in Europe and America in the first half of the Twentieth Century. The objective of this course is to introduce students to the philosophical and critical discourse of Modernist painting. Historical developments, internationalism, and the critical discourse of Modernism, are addressed. The first class reviews the artistic and cultural revolutions of the previous half-century. The principal movements covered are Cubism, Expressionism, Futurism, Constructivism, New Objectivity, Dada, Pittura Metafisica, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, and Neo-Dada, with particular focus on the pre-World War II historical avant-gardes. Artists studied include Picasso, Matisse, Kirchner, Duchamp, Boccioni, De Chirico, Ernst, Magritte, and Pollock.
Contemporary Art
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: ART 186 Art History II, or equivalent
Course code: ART 375 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: ART 350 L Contemporary Art
Hours: 45
Room: Tiziano
Description: The aim of this course is to give students a thorough and comprehensive grounding in the conceptual and stylistic trends governing the art of the late 20th century. This period deals specifically with the transition from Greenbergian High Modernism, through the dematerialization of the art object in the 1970's, to the postmodern and deconstructive theories of the 1980's and 90's. The course is divided into two main sections: Section One (1950-1980): Abstract Expressionism and Informal Art – Conceptual Art (Europe and USA); Section Two (1980-1990's): Postmodernism -- Current Trends (Europe and USA). The course will give particular attention to the development of Italian art from the 1950s to the present. The objective of this course is to introduce students to the philosophical and critical discourses relating to Modernism and Postmodernism.
Contemporary Art
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: ART 186 Art History II, or equivalent
Course code: ART 375 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Art History
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: ART 350 L Contemporary Art
Hours: 45
Room: Verdi
Description: The aim of this course is to give students a thorough and comprehensive grounding in the conceptual and stylistic trends governing the art of the late 20th century. This period deals specifically with the transition from Greenbergian High Modernism, through the dematerialization of the art object in the 1970's, to the postmodern and deconstructive theories of the 1980's and 90's. The course is divided into two main sections: Section One (1950-1980): Abstract Expressionism and Informal Art – Conceptual Art (Europe and USA); Section Two (1980-1990's): Postmodernism -- Current Trends (Europe and USA). The course will give particular attention to the development of Italian art from the 1950s to the present. The objective of this course is to introduce students to the philosophical and critical discourses relating to Modernism and Postmodernism.
Mind, Brain, and Behavior
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: PSY 150 Introduction to Psychology, or equivalent
Course code: BIO 277 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Biological Sciences
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title:
Hours: 45
Room: Marco Aurelio
Dual Listing: PSY 277 R
Description: This introduction to the science of psychology aims to elucidate the basics of the structure, function, evolution, development, and pathology of the nervous system in relation to human behavior and mental life. Specifically, the course is designed to review integrated and experimentally derived information from many disciplines in order to gain a better understanding of human behavior as a function based on brain structure. Through the course students will learn how human beings perceive and feel the world; how they think, learn, remember and forget; how the emotions and motivations influence behavior; how personality and well-being are structured; how the environment epigenetically influences behavioral outcomes; how the parental behavior may be inter-generationally transmitted to future generations. Each lesson explores the functioning of the nervous system when involved in all these behavioral processes. Emphasis is placed on scientific analysis of recent theories and interpretation of innovative research findings, with the ultimate goal of understanding more about the human mind and behavior from a scientific perspective. This course is relevant to students majoring in all disciplines in which the study of human behavior is important.
Introduction to Molecular Genetics with Laboratory
THU 12:30 PM-3:00 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: General Biology I with Laboratory, or equivalent
Notes: lab section may be scheduled on any weekday (from MON at 9:00 AM to FRI at 2:00 PM). The timeframe of the science lecture/lab is subject to adjustments and will be confirmed by the start of the term. Concurrent enrollment in HIS/PHI 281 Italy's Contribution to Modern Science mandatory for STEM majors. Minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA required. Specific STEM attendance and grading policies apply. Lab fee required. Public transport costs apply. Taught in collaboration with Università Roma Tre.
Course code: BIO 280 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Biological Sciences
Credits: 4
Premises: Viale G. Marconi 446
Marist Code/Title: BIOL 180 L Introduction to Genetics
Hours: 45
Room: Università Roma Tre
Description: This course provides students with a foundation of the principles of genetics. Starting with the study of the function and structure of DNA and RNA, the course explores the principles of genetics such as transmission (Mendelian Inheritance), gene expression, and recombination. Lectures are combined with laboratory sessions to provide students with practical knowledge of the techniques of molecular genetics. This course is for science majors only. Taught in collaboration with Università Roma Tre. Note: Specific STEM attendance and grading policies apply.
LAB session for Intro to Molecular Genetics
TUE 2:00 PM-5:00 PM
Section: LAB
OPEN
Notes: lab fee required. Taught in collaboration with Università Roma Tre.
Course code: BIO 280L R
Campus: Rome
Department: Biological Sciences
Credits: 0
Premises: Viale G. Marconi 446
Marist Code/Title: BIOL 180 L Introduction to Genetics
Hours: 45
Room: Univ. Roma Tre
Description: Mandatory laboratory portion for BIO 280.
Human Anatomy II with Laboratory
THU 4:00 PM-6:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: Grade C or higher in Human Anatomy I with Laboratory, or equivalent
Notes: timeframe of lecture and/or lab subject to adjustment, may be rescheduled on any weekday from MON 9:00AM to FRI 2:00PM, to be announced by the start of the term. Concurrent enrollment in HIS/PHR 281 Italy's Contribution to Modern Science mandatory for STEM majors. Minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA required. Specific STEM attendance and grading policies apply. Lab fee required. Public transport costs apply. Taught in collaboration with Università Roma Tre
Course code: BIO 320 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Biological Sciences
Credits: 4
Premises: Viale G. Marconi 446
Marist Code/Title: BIOL 132 L Intro to Human Anatomy & Physiology II
Hours: 45
Room: Univ. Roma Tre
Description: This course is the second part of a two-semester introductory sequence to human anatomy and physiology. It emphasizes tissue organization, physiology, and the structure of endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, immune, digestive, reproductive, lymphatic systems. The laboratory reflects these topics. This course does not involve the use of dissected or prosected materials. Italian law forbids the use of cadaver materials in all but medical school courses of instruction. This course is for science majors only. Taught in collaboration with Università Roma Tre. Note: Specific STEM attendance and grading policies apply.
Human Anatomy II with Laboratory
THU 4:00 PM-6:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: Grade C or higher in Human Anatomy I with Laboratory, or equivalent
Notes: lab section may be scheduled on any weekday (from MON at 9:00 AM to FRI at 2:00 PM). The timeframe of the science lecture/lab is subject to adjustments and will be confirmed by the start of the term. Concurrent enrollment in HIS/PHI 281 Italy's Contribution to Modern Science mandatory for STEM majors. Minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA required. Specific STEM attendance and grading policies apply. Lab fee required. Public transport costs apply. Taught in collaboration with Università Roma Tre.
Course code: BIO 320 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Biological Sciences
Credits: 4
Premises: Viale G. Marconi 446
Marist Code/Title: BIOL 132 L Intro to Human Anatomy & Physiology II
Hours: 45
Room: Univ. Roma Tre
Description: This course is the second part of a two-semester introductory sequence to human anatomy and physiology. It emphasizes tissue organization, physiology, and the structure of endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, immune, digestive, reproductive, lymphatic systems. The laboratory reflects these topics. This course does not involve the use of dissected or prosected materials. Italian law forbids the use of cadaver materials in all but medical school courses of instruction. This course is for science majors only. Taught in collaboration with Università Roma Tre. Note: Specific STEM attendance and grading policies apply.
LAB sessions for Human Anatomy II
WED 12:30 PM-3:30 PM
Section: LAB
OPEN
Notes: lab fee required
Course code: BIO 320L R
Campus: Rome
Department: Biological Sciences
Credits: 0
Premises: Viale G. Marconi 446
Marist Code/Title: No credit
Hours: 45
Room: Univ. Roma Tre
Description: The laboratory reflects tissue organization, physiology, and the structure of endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, immune, digestive, reproductive, lymphatic systems.
LAB session for Human Anatomy II
WED 12:30 PM-3:30 PM
Section: LAB
OPEN
Notes: lab fee required. Taught in collaboration with Università Roma Tre.
Course code: BIO 320L R
Campus: Rome
Department: Biological Sciences
Credits: 0
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: BIOL 132 L Intro to Human Anatomy & Physiology II
Hours: 45
Room: TBA
Description: Mandatory laboratory portion for BIO 320. The laboratory reflects tissue organization, physiology, and the structure of endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, immune, digestive, reproductive, lymphatic systems.
Principles of Biochemistry
MON 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: CHM 221 Organic Chemistry I with Laboratory and General Biology I, or equivalents
Notes: Concurrent enrollment in HIS/PHI 281 Italy's Contribution to Modern Science mandatory for STEM majors. Minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA required. Specific STEM attendance and grading policies apply.
Course code: BIO 330 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Biological Sciences
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title:
Hours: 45
Room: TBA
Dual Listing: CHM 330 R
Description: This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the concepts of biochemistry. It focuses on understanding the structure, synthesis and metabolism of the major biomolecules: nucleotides, lipids, proteins and carbohydrates. Furthermore, it explores the biochemical principles of genetics, enzyme function and other signaling functions in the body. Note: Specific STEM attendance and grading policies apply.
Introduction to Neuroscience
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: Enrollment is restricted to Science or Psychology majors only. Grade of C or higher in General Biology I with Laboratory, or equivalent
Notes: Concurrent enrollment in HIS/PHI 281 Italy's Contribution to Modern Science mandatory for STEM majors. Minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA required. Specific STEM attendance and grading policies apply.
Course code: BIO 360 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Biological Sciences
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: BIOL 260 L Introduction to Neuroscience
Hours: 45
Room: Tito
Description: This course provides a study of the organization and function of the human nervous system and brain. Students will gain an understanding of the physiological properties of neurons, examine the structure and the function of the system’s brain that serves the senses and commands voluntary movements. Particular emphasis will be given to the neurology of human behavior including motivation, sex, emotion, sleep, language, attention and mental illness. Students will also explore how the environment modifies the brain. Through a field trip to a neuroscientific laboratory, the students will be introduced to the main Neuroscience techniques aimed at studying the brain’s plasticity. Specific attendance and grading policies apply.
Introduction to Neuroscience
MON,TUE,THU 9:00 AM-11:05 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: Enrollment is restricted to Science or Psychology majors only. Grade of C or higher in General Biology I with Laboratory, or equivalent
Notes: 6-week course, from June 3 to July 11. Min. 3.0 cumulative GPA required. Specific STEM attendance and grading policies apply.
Course code: BIO 360 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Biological Sciences
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: BIOL 260 L Introduction to Neuroscience
Hours: 45
Room: TBA
Description: This course provides a study of the organization and function of the human nervous system and brain. Students will gain an understanding of the physiological properties of neurons, examine the structure and the function of the system’s brain that serves the senses and commands voluntary movements. Particular emphasis will be given to the neurology of human behavior including motivation, sex, emotion, sleep, language, attention and mental illness. Students will also explore how the environment modifies the brain. Through a field trip to a neuroscientific laboratory, the students will be introduced to the main Neuroscience techniques aimed at studying the brain’s plasticity. Specific attendance and grading policies apply.
General Microbiology with Laboratory
MON 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: 1) General Biology I and II; 2) CHM 221 Organic Chemistry I; 3) BIO 280 Introduction to Molecular Genetics, or equivalents.
Notes: lab section may be scheduled on any weekday (from MON at 9:00 AM to FRI at 2:00 PM). The timeframe of the science lecture/lab is subject to adjustments and will be confirmed by the start of the term. Concurrent enrollment in HIS/PHI 281 Italy's Contribution to Modern Science mandatory for STEM majors. Minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA required. Specific STEM attendance and grading policies apply. Lab fee required. Public transport costs apply. Taught in collaboration with Università Roma Tre.
Course code: BIO 380 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Biological Sciences
Credits: 4
Premises: Viale G. Marconi 446
Marist Code/Title: BIOL 312 L Microbiology
Hours: 45
Room: Univ. Roma Tre
Description: The course provides a survey of the biology of microorganisms, with emphasis on the domain Bacteria. Topics include cell structure, microbial growth, metabolism, genetics, DNA manipulation, diversity among Bacteria, Archea and Virus, microbial ecology and evolution. The course also explores the interaction of microorganisms with humans, infection diseases and their transmission. The laboratory experience includes general microbiology laboratory procedures of culturing, identifying, analysing and researching microbes. Taught in collaboration with Università Roma Tre. Specific STEM attendance and grading policies apply.
LAB session for General Microbiology
TUE 9:00 AM-12:00 NOON
Section: LAB
OPEN
Notes: lab fee required. Taught in collaboration with Università Roma Tre.
Course code: BIO 380L R
Campus: Rome
Department: Biological Sciences
Credits: 0
Premises: Viale G. Marconi 446
Marist Code/Title:
Hours: 45
Room: Univ. Roma Tre
Description: Mandatory laboratory portion for BIO 380.
Introduction to Business
MON 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Course code: BUS 130 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: BUS 100 N Intro to Business Management
Hours: 45
Room: Stone
Description: This course will introduce students to the world of business and help them prepare for the economic roles of consumers, workers, and citizens. It will also serve as a foundation for other business courses students may take in college. Students will be introduced to each of the functional areas of business, including marketing, finance, management, and operations management, human resources management, and business intelligence. The course is designed to help students appreciate the interrelationship of these business functions and, more generally, the role and context of business in society.
Principles of Microeconomics
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Notes: Mathematical aptitude is required
Course code: BUS 178 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: ECON 103 L Principles of Microeconomics
Hours: 45
Room: Stone
Description: Economic analysis is one of the most useful tools for understanding social phenomena. Principles of Microeconomics introduces students to the basics of economic ways of thinking. Economic theory is explained through the study of methods of analysis, assumptions and theories about how firms and individuals behave and how markets work. The course is a necessary foundation for students wishing to continue the study of economics and business in their academic careers and it is also useful for students in the applied social sciences. The course is divided into four parts: The first is an introduction to languages, methods, and modeling used in microeconomics; the second part focuses on the firm production process and market strategy; the third analyses consumer theory and the way in which individual behavior is modeled by economists; and the concluding part of the course studies how the competitive and non-competitive market works. The teaching includes the extensive use of case studies and policy issues which will be discussed in class.
Principles of Macroeconomics
THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 178 Principles of Microeconomics, or equivalent
Notes: Mathematical aptitude is required
Course code: BUS 180 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: ECON 104 L Principles of Macroeconomics
Hours: 45
Room: Stone
Description: Economics is the study of choice under conditions of scarcity: The resources needed to produce goods and services are limited compared to human desires. Economics is divided into two major areas. Microeconomics studies the choices of consumers, firms, and governments, and describes the working of markets. Macroeconomics studies the behavior of the entire economy. It explains phenomena such as growth, business cycle, inflation, and unemployment. This course is an introduction to economics. The basic principles of economics will be presented and applied in order to explain some features of the modern economy.
Foundations of Management
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: BUS 195 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: BUS 195 N Foundations of Management
Hours: 45
Room: Leonardo
Description: This is a foundational level management theory course designed to teach students with no background in business management the core concepts and terminology needed to be successful in subsequent management courses. It emphasizes the functions of planning, organizing, directing, and controlling. In each session the class explores some aspects of management in theoretical terms and then focuses on application of the theory to the practical problems facing managers.
Foundations of Management
MON 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
FULL
Course code: BUS 195 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: BUS 195 N Foundations of Management
Hours: 45
Room: Stone
Description: This is a foundational level management theory course designed to teach students with no background in business management the core concepts and terminology needed to be successful in subsequent management courses. It emphasizes the functions of planning, organizing, directing, and controlling. In each session the class explores some aspects of management in theoretical terms and then focuses on application of the theory to the practical problems facing managers.
Foundations of Management
MON 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 202
OPEN
Course code: BUS 195 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: BUS 195 N Foundations of Management
Hours: 45
Room: Dante
Description: This is a foundational level management theory course designed to teach students with no background in business management the core concepts and terminology needed to be successful in subsequent management courses. It emphasizes the functions of planning, organizing, directing, and controlling. In each session the class explores some aspects of management in theoretical terms and then focuses on application of the theory to the practical problems facing managers.
Principles of Marketing
MON 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: BUS 210 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: BUS 210 N Principles of Marketing
Hours: 45
Room: Verdi
Description: Marketing is a dynamic and exciting field, a key tool in confronting the challenges that enterprises are facing every day. The purpose of this course is to introduce marketing principles and concepts. In this course students will learn about the "real" nature and scope of marketing management. They will be introduced to aspects of marketing, such as: Marketing Strategy, the 4 P’s, Market Planning, Retailing and Wholesaling, Target Marketing, Market Segmentation, Services Marketing. Students will also learn about the strategic importance of marketing to an enterprise, whether it be a profit-oriented business firm or a not-for-profit organization.
Principles of Marketing
MON 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 102
FULL
Course code: BUS 210 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: BUS 210 N Principles of Marketing
Hours: 45
Room: Tiziano
Description: Marketing is a dynamic and exciting field, a key tool in confronting the challenges that enterprises are facing every day. The purpose of this course is to introduce marketing principles and concepts. In this course students will learn about the "real" nature and scope of marketing management. They will be introduced to aspects of marketing, such as: Marketing Strategy, the 4 P’s, Market Planning, Retailing and Wholesaling, Target Marketing, Market Segmentation, Services Marketing. Students will also learn about the strategic importance of marketing to an enterprise, whether it be a profit-oriented business firm or a not-for-profit organization.
Principles of Marketing
MON to FRI 9:00 AM-11:45 AM
Section: 401
OPEN
Course code: BUS 210 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: BUS 210 N Principles of Marketing
Hours: 42
Room: Stone
Description: Marketing is a dynamic and exciting field, a key tool in confronting the challenges that enterprises are facing every day. The purpose of this course is to introduce marketing principles and concepts. In this course students will learn about the "real" nature and scope of marketing management. They will be introduced to aspects of marketing, such as: Marketing Strategy, the 4 P’s, Market Planning, Retailing and Wholesaling, Target Marketing, Market Segmentation, Services Marketing. Students will also learn about the strategic importance of marketing to an enterprise, whether it be a profit-oriented business firm or a not-for-profit organization.
Principles of Marketing
THU 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Course code: BUS 210 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: BUS 210 N Principles of Marketing
Hours: 45
Room: Stone
Description: Marketing is a dynamic and exciting field, a key tool in confronting the challenges that enterprises are facing every day. The purpose of this course is to introduce marketing principles and concepts. In this course students will learn about the "real" nature and scope of marketing management. They will be introduced to aspects of marketing, such as: Marketing Strategy, the 4 P’s, Market Planning, Retailing and Wholesaling, Target Marketing, Market Segmentation, Services Marketing. Students will also learn about the strategic importance of marketing to an enterprise, whether it be a profit-oriented business firm or a not-for-profit organization.
Principles of Marketing
MON 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
Course code: BUS 210 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: BUS 210 N Principles of Marketing
Hours: 45
Room: Donatello
Description: Marketing is a dynamic and exciting field, a key tool in confronting the challenges that enterprises are facing every day. The purpose of this course is to introduce marketing principles and concepts. In this course students will learn about the "real" nature and scope of marketing management. They will be introduced to aspects of marketing, such as: Marketing Strategy, the 4 P’s, Market Planning, Retailing and Wholesaling, Target Marketing, Market Segmentation, Services Marketing. Students will also learn about the strategic importance of marketing to an enterprise, whether it be a profit-oriented business firm or a not-for-profit organization.
Principles of Marketing
MON 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 203
FULL
Course code: BUS 210 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Marist Code/Title: BUS 210 N Principles of Marketing
Hours: 45
Room: Firenze
Description: Marketing is a dynamic and exciting field, a key tool in confronting the challenges that enterprises are facing every day. The purpose of this course is to introduce marketing principles and concepts. In this course students will learn about the "real" nature and scope of marketing management. They will be introduced to aspects of marketing, such as: Marketing Strategy, the 4 P’s, Market Planning, Retailing and Wholesaling, Target Marketing, Market Segmentation, Services Marketing. Students will also learn about the strategic importance of marketing to an enterprise, whether it be a profit-oriented business firm or a not-for-profit organization.
Principles of Marketing
MON to THU 4:15 PM-6:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Course code: BUS 210 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: BUS 210 N Principles of Marketing
Hours: 45
Room: Caravaggio
Description: Marketing is a dynamic and exciting field, a key tool in confronting the challenges that enterprises are facing every day. The purpose of this course is to introduce marketing principles and concepts. In this course students will learn about the "real" nature and scope of marketing management. They will be introduced to aspects of marketing, such as: Marketing Strategy, the 4 P’s, Market Planning, Retailing and Wholesaling, Target Marketing, Market Segmentation, Services Marketing. Students will also learn about the strategic importance of marketing to an enterprise, whether it be a profit-oriented business firm or a not-for-profit organization.
Principles of Marketing
MON to THU 1:15 PM-3:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Course code: BUS 210 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: BUS 210 N Principles of Marketing
Hours: 45
Room: Marco Polo
Description: Marketing is a dynamic and exciting field, a key tool in confronting the challenges that enterprises are facing every day. The purpose of this course is to introduce marketing principles and concepts. In this course students will learn about the "real" nature and scope of marketing management. They will be introduced to aspects of marketing, such as: Marketing Strategy, the 4 P’s, Market Planning, Retailing and Wholesaling, Target Marketing, Market Segmentation, Services Marketing. Students will also learn about the strategic importance of marketing to an enterprise, whether it be a profit-oriented business firm or a not-for-profit organization.
Principles of Finance
WED 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: 1) BUS 178 Principles of Microeconomics; 2) BUS 180 Principles of Macroeconomics; 3) MAT 130 Topics in Mathematics for Liberal Arts, or an introductory course in accounting, or equivalent. Mathematical aptitude is required
Course code: BUS 222 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: ECON 332 N Priniciples of Finance
Hours: 45
Room: Raffaello
Description: This course introduces students to the basic concepts of finance such as time value of money, valuation and risk, assets, securities, financing long-and short-term, capital markets. This will also result in the exposure to basic procedures for the application and interpretation of financial statement analysis. The course will combine the theoretical underpinning of finance with real-world examples, including several case study discussions.
Principles of Finance
TUE 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: 1) BUS 178 Principles of Microeconomics; 2) BUS 180 Principles of Macroeconomics; 3) MAT 130 Topics in Mathematics for Liberal Arts, or an introductory course in accounting, or equivalent. Mathematical aptitude is required
Course code: BUS 222 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: ECON 332 N Priniciples of Finance
Hours: 45
Room: Raffaello
Description: This course introduces students to the basic concepts of finance such as time value of money, valuation and risk, assets, securities, financing long-and short-term, capital markets. This will also result in the exposure to basic procedures for the application and interpretation of financial statement analysis. The course will combine the theoretical underpinning of finance with real-world examples, including several case study discussions.
Principles of Finance
WED 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
Prerequisites: 1) BUS 178 Principles of Microeconomics; 2) BUS 180 Principles of Macroeconomics; 3) MAT 130 Topics in Mathematics for Liberal Arts, or an introductory course in accounting, or equivalent. Mathematical aptitude is required
Course code: BUS 222 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: ECON 332 N Priniciples of Finance
Hours: 45
Room: Stone
Description: This course introduces students to the basic concepts of finance such as time value of money, valuation and risk, assets, securities, financing long-and short-term, capital markets. This will also result in the exposure to basic procedures for the application and interpretation of financial statement analysis. The course will combine the theoretical underpinning of finance with real-world examples, including several case study discussions.
Principles of Finance
MON to THU 1:15 PM-3:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: 1) BUS 178 Principles of Microeconomics; 2) BUS 180 Principles of Macroeconomics; 3) MAT 130 Topics in Mathematics for Liberal Arts, or an introductory course in accounting, or equivalent. Mathematical aptitude is required
Course code: BUS 222 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: ECON 332 N Priniciples of Finance
Hours: 45
Room: Galileo
Description: This course introduces students to the basic concepts of finance such as time value of money, valuation and risk, assets, securities, financing long-and short-term, capital markets. This will also result in the exposure to basic procedures for the application and interpretation of financial statement analysis. The course will combine the theoretical underpinning of finance with real-world examples, including several case study discussions.
Principles of Finance
MON 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: 1) BUS 178 Principles of Microeconomics; 2) BUS 180 Principles of Macroeconomics; 3) MAT 130 Topics in Mathematics for Liberal Arts, or an introductory course in accounting, or equivalent. Mathematical aptitude is required
Course code: BUS 222 R
Campus: Rome
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: ECON 332 N Priniciples of Finance
Hours: 45
Room: Traiano
Description: This course introduces students to the basic concepts of finance such as time value of money, valuation and risk, assets, securities, financing long-and short-term, capital markets. This will also result in the exposure to basic procedures for the application and interpretation of financial statement analysis. The course will combine the theoretical underpinning of finance with real-world examples, including several case study discussions.
Event Planning
MON 6:00 PM-7:40 PM & WED 6:00 PM-7:40 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Notes: contact hours may include a mandatory final event held outside regular class hours. The day/time of the event will be announced early in the term.
Course code: BUS 232 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: FASH 261 N Event Planning
Hours: 60
Room: Donatello
Dual Listing: COM 232 F
Description: This course introduces students to special event planning processes and techniques. Emphasis is on creating, organizing, identifying sponsors, marketing, and implementing large-scale community events. We will explore this very detail-oriented field as it deals with vendors, contracts, fundraising, budgeting, ethics, and other aspects. Students will research products, competition, and target markets to determine best possible exposure and success. As part of the course students may organize a real event in interdisciplinary collaboration with other departments.
Event Planning
MON 9:00 AM-10:40 AM & WED 9:00 AM-10:40 AM
Section: 102
OPEN
Notes: contact hours may include a mandatory final event held outside regular class hours. The day/time of the event will be announced early in the term.
Course code: BUS 232 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: FASH 261 N Event Planning
Hours: 60
Room: Dante
Dual Listing: COM 232 F
Description: This course introduces students to special event planning processes and techniques. Emphasis is on creating, organizing, identifying sponsors, marketing, and implementing large-scale community events. We will explore this very detail-oriented field as it deals with vendors, contracts, fundraising, budgeting, ethics, and other aspects. Students will research products, competition, and target markets to determine best possible exposure and success. As part of the course students may organize a real event in interdisciplinary collaboration with other departments.
Event Planning
MON 6:00 PM-7:40 PM & WED 6:00 PM-7:40 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Notes: contact hours may include a mandatory final event held outside regular class hours. The day/time of the event will be announced early in the term.
Course code: BUS 232 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: FASH 261 N Event Planning
Hours: 60
Room: Puccini
Dual Listing: COM 232 F
Description: This course introduces students to special event planning processes and techniques. Emphasis is on learning to create, organize, identify sponsors for, market, and implement different types of events. We will explore this very detail-oriented field as it deals with vendors, contracts, fundraising, budgeting, ethics, and other aspects. Students will research products, competition, and target markets to determine the best possible exposure and success. As part of the course students may organize a real event in interdisciplinary collaboration with other departments.
Event Planning
TUE 6:00 PM-7:40 PM & THU 6:00 PM-7:40 PM
Section: 202
FULL
Notes: contact hours may include a mandatory final event held outside regular class hours. The day/time of the event will be announced early in the term.
Course code: BUS 232 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: FASH 261 N Event Planning
Hours: 60
Room: Galileo
Dual Listing: COM 232 F
Description: This course introduces students to special event planning processes and techniques. Emphasis is on learning to create, organize, identify sponsors for, market, and implement different types of events. We will explore this very detail-oriented field as it deals with vendors, contracts, fundraising, budgeting, ethics, and other aspects. Students will research products, competition, and target markets to determine the best possible exposure and success. As part of the course students may organize a real event in interdisciplinary collaboration with other departments.
Event Planning
MON 9:00 AM-10:40 AM & WED 9:00 AM-10:40 AM
Section: 203
FULL
Notes: contact hours may include a mandatory final event held outside regular class hours. The day/time of the event will be announced early in the term.
Course code: BUS 232 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: FASH 261 N Event Planning
Hours: 60
Room: Leonardo
Dual Listing: COM 232 F
Description: This course introduces students to special event planning processes and techniques. Emphasis is on learning to create, organize, identify sponsors for, market, and implement different types of events. We will explore this very detail-oriented field as it deals with vendors, contracts, fundraising, budgeting, ethics, and other aspects. Students will research products, competition, and target markets to determine the best possible exposure and success. As part of the course students may organize a real event in interdisciplinary collaboration with other departments.
Event Planning
MON to THU 9:00 AM-12:40 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Notes: contact hours may include a mandatory final event held outside regular class hours. The day/time of the event will be announced early in the term.
Course code: BUS 232 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: FASH 261 N Event Planning
Hours: 60
Room: Galileo
Dual Listing: COM 232 F
Description: This course introduces students to special event planning processes and techniques. Emphasis is on learning to create, organize, identify sponsors for, market, and implement different types of events. We will explore this very detail-oriented field as it deals with vendors, contracts, fundraising, budgeting, ethics, and other aspects. Students will research products, competition, and target markets to determine the best possible exposure and success. As part of the course students may organize a real event in interdisciplinary collaboration with other departments.
Event Planning
MON to THU 9:00 AM-12:40 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Notes: contact hours may include a mandatory final event held outside regular class hours. The day/time of the event will be announced early in the term.
Course code: BUS 232 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: FASH 261 N Event Planning
Hours: 60
Room: Marco Polo
Dual Listing: COM 232 F
Description: This course introduces students to special event planning processes and techniques. Emphasis is on learning to create, organize, identify sponsors for, market, and implement different types of events. We will explore this very detail-oriented field as it deals with vendors, contracts, fundraising, budgeting, ethics, and other aspects. Students will research products, competition, and target markets to determine the best possible exposure and success. As part of the course students may organize a real event in interdisciplinary collaboration with other departments.
China's Development and the Global Shift
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: None; POL 150 Introduction to Political Science and BUS 180 Principles of Macroeconomics, or equivalents, are recommended
Course code: BUS 240 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: ECON 306 L China's Development & the Global Shift
Hours: 45
Room: Leonardo
Dual Listing: POL 240 F
Description: In order to truly grasp the shift in economic power that is currently changing the global economy, it is fundamental to understand the Chinese history of economic reform and its political, environmental, social context, and its implications. This course aims to explore the mechanism and consequences of modern China’s economic development as well as of China’s role in the global economy. Most of the analysis focuses on the recent history of China, especially following 1978 when China began its dramatic transformation from a planned to a market economy. The course will be organized around a number of major themes which include references to the historical and institutional background, the “rise of China” in the current geopolitical imagination, and key issues in China’s foreign relations. The key questions we will try to understand in this course are: Is China’s growth rate sustainable; can it be repeated in other developing countries; and what are the costs of this rapid growth?
Wine Business
WED 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents
Course code: BUS 252 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Marist Code/Title: BUS 351 L Wine Business and Marketing
Hours: 45
Room: Firenze
Dual Listing: NUH 252 F
Description: This course explores the business and marketing of wine, with special focus on U.S. markets. The Wine trade and consumption in the U.S. have consistently increased in recent years. If until the early 1990’s wine consumption was concentrated in a few major states, today wine is consumed by a large part of the U.S. population. Italian wines, counting for 30% of U.S. wine imports, are a major part of this economic and cultural scenario. In addition, new wine markets have emerged worldwide. This growing interest has strengthened the role of traditional key players in the wine trade, such as importers, distributors, wholesalers, retailers, while helping to create new professional categories, such as wine writers, wine club managers, and event promoters. In this course students learn skills that help equip them to take on such roles. Given the notable diversity and quality of Italian wines, students examine issues of sourcing, shipment chains and trading channels, and market impact. The course includes business simulations, and students produce a startup or marketing project.
Wine Business
MON to FRI 2:00 PM-4:45 PM
Section: 401
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents
Course code: BUS 252 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: BUS 351 N Wine Business and Marketing
Hours: 42
Room: Palladio
Dual Listing: NUH 252 F
Description: This course explores the business and marketing of wine, with special focus on U.S. markets. The Wine trade and consumption in the U.S. have consistently increased in recent years. If until the early 1990’s wine consumption was concentrated in a few major states, today wine is consumed by a large part of the U.S. population. Italian wines, counting for 30% of U.S. wine imports, are a major part of this economic and cultural scenario. In addition, new wine markets have emerged worldwide. This growing interest has strengthened the role of traditional key players in the wine trade, such as importers, distributors, wholesalers, retailers, while helping to create new professional categories, such as wine writers, wine club managers, and event promoters. In this course students learn skills that help equip them to take on such roles. Given the notable diversity and quality of Italian wines, students examine issues of sourcing, shipment chains and trading channels, and market impact. The course includes business simulations, and students produce a startup or marketing project.
Wine Business
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents
Course code: BUS 252 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Marist Code/Title: BUS 351 L Wine Business and Marketing
Hours: 45
Room: Firenze
Dual Listing: NUH 252 F
Description: This course explores the business and marketing of wine, with special focus on U.S. markets. The Wine trade and consumption in the U.S. have consistently increased in recent years. If until the early 1990’s wine consumption was concentrated in a few major states, today wine is consumed by a large part of the U.S. population. Italian wines, counting for 30% of U.S. wine imports, are a major part of this economic and cultural scenario. In addition, new wine markets have emerged worldwide. This growing interest has strengthened the role of traditional key players in the wine trade, such as importers, distributors, wholesalers, retailers, while helping to create new professional categories, such as wine writers, wine club managers, and event promoters. In this course students learn skills that help equip them to take on such roles. Given the notable diversity and quality of Italian wines, students examine issues of sourcing, shipment chains and trading channels, and market impact. The course includes business simulations, and students produce a startup or marketing project.
Wine Business
TUE 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents
Course code: BUS 252 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Marist Code/Title: BUS 351 L Wine Business and Marketing
Hours: 45
Room: Firenze
Dual Listing: NUH 252 F
Description: This course explores the business and marketing of wine, with special focus on U.S. markets. The Wine trade and consumption in the U.S. have consistently increased in recent years. If until the early 1990’s wine consumption was concentrated in a few major states, today wine is consumed by a large part of the U.S. population. Italian wines, counting for 30% of U.S. wine imports, are a major part of this economic and cultural scenario. In addition, new wine markets have emerged worldwide. This growing interest has strengthened the role of traditional key players in the wine trade, such as importers, distributors, wholesalers, retailers, while helping to create new professional categories, such as wine writers, wine club managers, and event promoters. In this course students learn skills that help equip them to take on such roles. Given the notable diversity and quality of Italian wines, students examine issues of sourcing, shipment chains and trading channels, and market impact. The course includes business simulations, and students produce a startup or marketing project.
Wine Business
MON to THU 4:15 PM-6:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents
Course code: BUS 252 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Marist Code/Title: BUS 351 L Wine Business and Marketing
Hours: 45
Room: Firenze
Dual Listing: NUH 252 F
Description: This course explores the business and marketing of wine, with special focus on U.S. markets. The Wine trade and consumption in the U.S. have consistently increased in recent years. If until the early 1990’s wine consumption was concentrated in a few major states, today wine is consumed by a large part of the U.S. population. Italian wines, counting for 30% of U.S. wine imports, are a major part of this economic and cultural scenario. In addition, new wine markets have emerged worldwide. This growing interest has strengthened the role of traditional key players in the wine trade, such as importers, distributors, wholesalers, retailers, while helping to create new professional categories, such as wine writers, wine club managers, and event promoters. In this course students learn skills that help equip them to take on such roles. Given the notable diversity and quality of Italian wines, students examine issues of sourcing, shipment chains and trading channels, and market impact. The course includes business simulations, and students produce a startup or marketing project.
Wine Business
MON 5:00 PM-7:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents
Course code: BUS 252 T
Campus: Tuscania
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Largo della Rocca 7
Marist Code/Title: BUS 351 L Wine Business and Marketing
Hours: 45
Room: Paolo Buzzurro
Dual Listing: NUH 252 T
Description: This course explores the business and marketing of wine, with special focus on U.S. markets. Wine trade and consumption in the U.S. have consistently increased in recent years. If until the early 1990’s wine consumption was concentrated in a few major states, today wine is consumed by a large part of the U.S. population. Italian wine, counting for 30% of U.S. wine imports, is a major part of this economic and cultural scenario. In addition, new wine markets have emerged worldwide. This growing interest has strengthened the role of traditional key players in the wine trade such as importers, distributors, wholesalers, retailers, while helping to create new professional figures such as wine writers, wine club managers, and event promoters. In this course students learn skills that help equip them to take on such roles. Given the notable diversity and quality of Italian wines, students examine issues of sourcing, shipment chains and trading channels, and market impact. The course includes business simulations, and students produce a startup or marketing project.
Wine Business
MON to THU 5:00 PM-7:30 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents
Course code: BUS 252 T
Campus: Tuscania
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Largo della Rocca 7
Marist Code/Title: BUS 351 L Wine Business and Marketing
Hours: 45
Room: Paolo Buzzurro
Dual Listing: NUH 252 T
Description: This course explores the business and marketing of wine, with special focus on U.S. markets. Wine trade and consumption in the U.S. have consistently increased in recent years. If until the early 1990’s wine consumption was concentrated in a few major states, today wine is consumed by a large part of the U.S. population. Italian wine, counting for 30% of U.S. wine imports, is a major part of this economic and cultural scenario. In addition, new wine markets have emerged worldwide. This growing interest has strengthened the role of traditional key players in the wine trade such as importers, distributors, wholesalers, retailers, while helping to create new professional figures such as wine writers, wine club managers, and event promoters. In this course students learn skills that help equip them to take on such roles. Given the notable diversity and quality of Italian wines, students examine issues of sourcing, shipment chains and trading channels, and market impact. The course includes business simulations, and students produce a startup or marketing project.
Crosscultural Communication in the Workplace
MON 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: BUS 270 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: BUS 370 N Crosscultural Communication in the Workplace
Hours: 45
Room: Donatello
Dual Listing: COM 271 F
Description: People from more than one culture increasingly have to work together, work side by side, or collaborate on international projects, both at home and abroad. How easy is it to step outside our own cultural expectations? This is an intercultural communications course aimed specifically at understanding intercultural interactions in business or in the workplace from both theoretical and practical standpoints. On a practical level, this course will involve the students' active participation in role play exercises and observations, and will help them predict and manage intercultural misunderstandings both in the workplace and in more informal social settings. Business practices in different countries, in particular Italy and the USA, and individual case studies will be assessed and discussed according to these frameworks.
Crosscultural Communication in the Workplace
MON 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Course code: BUS 270 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: BUS 370 N Crosscultural Communication in the Workplace
Hours: 45
Room: Raffaello
Dual Listing: COM 271 F
Description: People from more than one culture increasingly have to work together, work side by side, or collaborate on international projects, both at home and abroad. How easy is it to step outside our own cultural expectations? This is an intercultural communication course aimed specifically at understanding intercultural interactions in business or in the workplace from both theoretical and practical standpoints. On a practical level, this course will involve the students' active participation in role play exercises and observations, and will help them to predict and manage intercultural misunderstandings both in the workplace and in more informal social settings. Business practices in different countries, in particular Italy and the USA, and individual case studies will be assessed and discussed according to these frameworks.
Made in Italy: A Culture of Excellence
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: BUS 283 R
Campus: Rome
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: FASH 183 L Made in Italy: A culture of Excellence
Hours: 45
Room: Traiano
Dual Listing: SOC 283 R
Description: This course examines the "Made in Italy" phenomenon, emblematic of superlative quality. Home to the most iconic labels, brands, and craftsmanship, Italy is known for both its historic legacy and its present-day excellence in many fields. The course addresses the industries and fields of food and cuisine, fashion, and other areas of design, including industrial and architectural. Italian-made goods and services are an integral part of the Italian economy, society, history, and culture. Since a flow of expertise across time and disciplines seems to distinguish “Made in Italy,” students will connect the latter to patterns of continuity and change in Italian society and examine how the "Made in Italy" phenomenon has impacted the country's social fabric, character, and even mode of living ever since the Industrial Revolution, but, especially, since the post-war era, and how presently globalization is transforming the concept and its social reality. An additional concentration is on the business aspect of the label, in particular, on marketing, branding, and consumer behavior seen from both an Italian and international perspective. In careful consideration of recent developments, the focus may vary from semester to semester. Guest lectures and site visits will form part of this course.
Made in Italy: A Culture of Excellence
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Course code: BUS 283 R
Campus: Rome
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: FASH 183 L Made in Italy: A culture of Excellence
Hours: 45
Room: Marco Aurelio
Dual Listing: SOC 283 R
Description: This course examines the "Made in Italy" phenomenon, emblematic of superlative quality. Home to the most iconic labels, brands, and craftsmanship, Italy is known for both its historic legacy and its present-day excellence in many fields. The course addresses the industries and fields of food and cuisine, fashion, and other areas of design, including industrial and architectural. Italian-made goods and services are an integral part of the Italian economy, society, history, and culture. Since a flow of expertise across time and disciplines seems to distinguish “Made in Italy,” students will connect the latter to patterns of continuity and change in Italian society and examine how the "Made in Italy" phenomenon has impacted the country's social fabric, character, and even mode of living ever since the Industrial Revolution, but, especially, since the post-war era, and how presently globalization is transforming the concept and its social reality. An additional concentration is on the business aspect of the label, in particular, on marketing, branding, and consumer behavior seen from both an Italian and international perspective. In careful consideration of recent developments, the focus may vary from semester to semester. Guest lectures and site visits will form part of this course.
Made in Italy: A Culture of Excellence
MON to THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Course code: BUS 283 R
Campus: Rome
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: FASH 183 L Made in Italy: A Culture of Excellence
Hours: 48
Room: Tito
Dual Listing: SOC 283 R
Description: This course examines the "Made in Italy" phenomenon, emblematic of superlative quality. Home to the most iconic labels, brands, and craftsmanship, Italy is known for both its historic legacy and its present-day excellence in many fields. The course addresses the industries and fields of food and cuisine, fashion, and other areas of design, including industrial and architectural. Italian-made goods and services are an integral part of the Italian economy, society, history, and culture. Since a flow of expertise across time and disciplines seems to distinguish “Made in Italy,” students will connect the latter to patterns of continuity and change in Italian society and examine how the "Made in Italy" phenomenon has impacted the country's social fabric, character, and even mode of living ever since the Industrial Revolution, but, especially, since the post-war era, and how presently globalization is transforming the concept and its social reality. An additional concentration is on the business aspect of the label, in particular, on marketing, branding, and consumer behavior seen from both an Italian and international perspective. In careful consideration of recent developments, the focus may vary from semester to semester. Guest lectures and site visits will form part of this course.
Made in Italy: A Culture of Excellence
MON to THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Course code: BUS 283 R
Campus: Rome
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: FASH 183 L Made in Italy: A culture of Excellence
Hours: 45
Room: Traiano
Dual Listing: SOC 283 R
Description: This course examines the "Made in Italy" phenomenon, emblematic of superlative quality. Home to the most iconic labels, brands, and craftsmanship, Italy is known for both its historic legacy and its present-day excellence in many fields. The course addresses the industries and fields of food and cuisine, fashion, and other areas of design, including industrial and architectural. Italian-made goods and services are an integral part of the Italian economy, society, history, and culture. Since a flow of expertise across time and disciplines seems to distinguish “Made in Italy,” students will connect the latter to patterns of continuity and change in Italian society and examine how the "Made in Italy" phenomenon has impacted the country's social fabric, character, and even mode of living ever since the Industrial Revolution, but, especially, since the post-war era, and how presently globalization is transforming the concept and its social reality. An additional concentration is on the business aspect of the label, in particular, on marketing, branding, and consumer behavior seen from both an Italian and international perspective. In careful consideration of recent developments, the focus may vary from semester to semester. Guest lectures and site visits will form part of this course.
International Art Business
THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: ART 180 Art History I, or ART 186 Art History II, or equivalent
Course code: BUS 290 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: ART 318 N International Art Business
Hours: 45
Room: Galileo
Dual Listing: ART 297 F
Description: The course is designed to introduce students to the art market and the institutional networks that support and promote the art business, as well as giving them an understanding of the current art market and auction house environment. Through this course, students will meet specialists to develop the ability to identify and analyze works of art, learn how to recognize marketing opportunities, and determine appropriate strategies. The figures of the art dealer and the art administrator will be analyzed in depth, together with the main principles of the international laws that govern this particular field.
International Art Business
THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: ART 180 Art History I, or ART 186 Art History II, or equivalents
Course code: BUS 290 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: ART 318 N International Art Business
Hours: 45
Room: Fellini
Dual Listing: ART 297 F
Description: The course is designed to introduce students to the arts market and the institutional networks that support and promote the art business, as well as giving them an understanding of the current art market and auction house environment. Through this course, students will meet specialists to develop the ability to identify and analyze works of art, learn how to recognize marketing opportunities, and determine appropriate strategies. The figures of the art dealer and the art administrator will be analyzed in depth, together with the main principles of the international laws that govern this special field.
Human Resources Management
MON 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or equivalents
Course code: BUS 301 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: BUS 225 N Human Potential in Business Organizations
Hours: 45
Room: Verdi
Description: The course explores the Human Resources Management function in a corporate setting and focuses on the development of knowledge and skills that all managers and leaders need. Students learn the basic principles of designing and operating business organizations, from developing their mission, vision, and strategy to their key organizational features and processes. Students face issues of managing people in organizations, including hierarchy, leadership, and communication; systems of reward and recognition; and personnel (from recruitment to training and development). Some attention is given to the expanding role of corporations in dealing with social problems and issues. The course trains students to build skills relevant to leadership and management. These include public speaking and presenting, conflict resolution, teamwork, and business project management. Class content is delivered through lectures, group discussions, practical and experiential exercises, and case studies.
Human Resources Management
MON 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or equivalents
Course code: BUS 301 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: BUS 225 N Human Potential in Business Organizations
Hours: 45
Room: Galileo
Description: The course explores the Human Resources Management function in a corporate setting and focuses on the development of knowledge and skills that all managers and leaders need. Students learn the basic principles of designing and operating business organizations, from developing their mission, vision, and strategy to their key organizational features and processes. Students face issues of managing people in organizations, including hierarchy, leadership, and communication; systems of reward and recognition; and personnel (from recruitment to training and development). Some attention is given to the expanding role of corporations in dealing with social problems and issues. The course trains students to build skills relevant to leadership and management. These include public speaking and presenting, conflict resolution, teamwork, and business project management. Class content is delivered through lectures, group discussions, practical and experiential exercises, and case studies.
Human Resources Management
MON 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 202
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or equivalents
Course code: BUS 301 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: BUS 225 N Human Potential in Business Organizations
Hours: 45
Room: Galileo
Description: The course explores the Human Resources Management function in a corporate setting and focuses on the development of knowledge and skills that all managers and leaders need. Students learn the basic principles of designing and operating business organizations, from developing their mission, vision, and strategy to their key organizational features and processes. Students face issues of managing people in organizations, including hierarchy, leadership, and communication; systems of reward and recognition; and personnel (from recruitment to training and development). Some attention is given to the expanding role of corporations in dealing with social problems and issues. The course trains students to build skills relevant to leadership and management. These include public speaking and presenting, conflict resolution, teamwork, and business project management. Class content is delivered through lectures, group discussions, practical and experiential exercises, and case studies.
Human Resources Management
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or equivalents
Course code: BUS 301 R
Campus: Rome
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: BUS 225 N Human Potential in Business Organizations
Hours: 48
Room: Costantino
Description: The course explores the Human Resources Management function in a corporate setting and focuses on the development of knowledge and skills that all managers and leaders need. Students learn the basic principles of designing and operating business organizations, from developing their mission, vision, and strategy to their key organizational features and processes. Students face issues of managing people in organizations, including hierarchy, leadership, and communication; systems of reward and recognition; and personnel (from recruitment to training and development). Some attention is given to the expanding role of corporations in dealing with social problems and issues. The course trains students to build skills relevant to leadership and management. These include public speaking and presenting, conflict resolution, teamwork, and business project management. Class content is delivered through lectures, group discussions, practical and experiential exercises, and case studies.
Sociology of Consumerism
WED 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: An introductory social sciences or business course
Course code: BUS 303 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: BUS 241 / SOC 241 / HST 220 L History & Sociology of Modern Consumerism
Hours: 45
Room: Tiziano
Dual Listing: SOC 303 F
Description: This course will focus on the rise and development of consumer cultures. The aim is to study and to apply interdisciplinary theoretical approaches to the study of consumer society now and in the past. The course will explore key substantive themes in the history and sociology of consumption, including the following: 1) an overview of developments in the different theories of consumer culture; 2) the rise of commercial society, the relationship between freedom of choice and the power of commercial systems, models of consumer psychology and behavior, the nature of selves and identities in a post-traditional world, prosperity and progress; 3) the way class, gender, ethnicity, and age affect the nature of our participation in consumer culture; 4) the evolution of capitalism to the present day, as well as the history of commodities in a number of different settings (advertising, food and drink, fashion and clothes); 5) the social, cultural, and economic context of specific consumer groups, as well as case studies of specific commodities.
Consumer Behavior
TUE 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or PSY 150 Introduction to Psychology, or equivalent
Course code: BUS 307 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: BUS 307 N Consumer Behavior
Hours: 45
Room: Leonardo
Description: This course is designed to explore consumer behavior across a number of domains -- from the cognitive biases that impact daily decisions, to the ways in which consumers are influenced by the environment. This course draws from research in behavioral economics, psychology, and marketing and is intended to broadly survey concepts and case analyses in the study and practice of consumer behavior.
Global Business and Society
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 178 Principles of Microeconomics, or BUS 180 Principles of Macroeconomics, or equivalent
Course code: BUS 310 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: BUS 202 N Global Business & Society
Hours: 45
Room: Stone
Description: This course explores challenges facing modern corporations in organizing cross border activities. Specifically, it appraises the main economic theories of determinants of international business activities, and it offers a global perspective on long-term change in the world economy and the interaction between countries. Special attention is focused on the dynamics of international trade and investment, including the relationship between trade and economic growth, trade imbalances and protectionism. The course also looks at the role of economic and political institutions (WTO, IMF, etc.) and examines the main characteristics of the emerging economies, for instance, India and China. Themes include competition, development, exchange rate theory, the international monetary system, ethics, decision-making, and strategic operations in an international environment. Finally, the course examines a variety of alternative perspectives on the origins and processes of globalization.
Global Business and Society
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 102
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 178 Principles of Microeconomics, or BUS 180 Principles of Macroeconomics, or equivalent
Course code: BUS 310 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: BUS 202 N Global Business & Society
Hours: 45
Room: Marconi
Description: This course explores challenges facing modern corporations in organizing cross border activities. Specifically, it appraises the main economic theories of determinants of international business activities, and it offers a global perspective on long-term change in the world economy and the interaction between countries. Special attention is focused on the dynamics of international trade and investment, including the relationship between trade and economic growth, trade imbalances, and protectionism. The course also looks at the role of economic and political institutions (WTO, IMF, etc.) and examines the main characteristics of the emerging economies, for instance, India and China. Themes include competition, development, exchange rate theory, the international monetary system, ethics, decision-making, and strategic operations in an international environment. Finally, the course examines a variety of alternative perspectives on the origins and processes of globalization.
Global Business and Society
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 178 Principles of Microeconomics, or BUS 180 Principles of Macroeconomics, or equivalent
Course code: BUS 310 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: BUS 202 N Global Business & Society
Hours: 45
Room: Stone
Description: This course explores challenges facing modern corporations in organizing cross border activities. Specifically, it appraises the main economic theories of determinants of international business activities, and it offers a global perspective on long-term change in the world economy and the interaction between countries. Special attention is focused on the dynamics of international trade and investment, including the relationship between trade and economic growth, trade imbalances, and protectionism. The course also looks at the role of economic and political institutions (WTO, IMF, etc.) and examines the main characteristics of the emerging economies, for instance, India and China. Themes include competition, development, exchange rate theory, the international monetary system, ethics, decision-making, and strategic operations in an international environment. Finally, the course examines a variety of alternative perspectives on the origins and processes of globalization.
Global Business and Society
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 178 Principles of Microeconomics, or BUS 180 Principles of Macroeconomics, or equivalent
Course code: BUS 310 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: BUS 202 N Global Business & Society
Hours: 45
Room: Stone
Description: This course explores challenges facing modern corporations in organizing cross border activities. Specifically, it appraises the main economic theories of determinants of international business activities, and it offers a global perspective on long-term change in the world economy and the interaction between countries. Special attention is focused on the dynamics of international trade and investment, including the relationship between trade and economic growth, trade imbalances, and protectionism. The course also looks at the role of economic and political institutions (WTO, IMF, etc.) and examines the main characteristics of the emerging economies, for instance, India and China. Themes include competition, development, exchange rate theory, the international monetary system, ethics, decision-making, and strategic operations in an international environment. Finally, the course examines a variety of alternative perspectives on the origins and processes of globalization.
Global Business and Society
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 178 Principles of Microeconomics, or BUS 180 Principles of Macroeconomics, or equivalent
Course code: BUS 310 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: BUS 202 N Global Business & Society
Hours: 45
Room: Marconi
Description: This course explores challenges facing modern corporations in organizing cross border activities. Specifically, it appraises the main economic theories of determinants of international business activities, and it offers a global perspective on long-term change in the world economy and the interaction between countries. Special attention is focused on the dynamics of international trade and investment, including the relationship between trade and economic growth, trade imbalances, and protectionism. The course also looks at the role of economic and political institutions (WTO, IMF, etc.) and examines the main characteristics of the emerging economies, for instance, India and China. Themes include competition, development, exchange rate theory, the international monetary system, ethics, decision-making, and strategic operations in an international environment. Finally, the course examines a variety of alternative perspectives on the origins and processes of globalization.
Organizational Behavior
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or equivalents
Course code: BUS 311 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: BUS 311 N Organizational Behavior
Hours: 45
Room: Leonardo
Description: This course is about understanding how people and groups in organizations behave, react, and interpret events. It also describes the role of organizational systems, structures, and processes in shaping behavior, and explains how organizations really work. Drawing from fields including management, anthropology, sociology, and psychology, Organizational Behavior provides a foundation for the effective management of people in organizations.
Organizational Behavior
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or equivalents
Course code: BUS 311 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: BUS 311 N Organizational Behavior
Hours: 45
Room: Raffaello
Description: This course is about understanding how people and groups in organizations behave, react, and interpret events. It also describes the role of organizational systems, structures, and processes in shaping behavior, and explains how organizations really work. Drawing from fields including management, anthropology, sociology, and psychology, Organizational Behavior provides a foundation for the effective management of people in organizations.
International Marketing
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or equivalent
Course code: BUS 312 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: BUS 220 N Introduction to International Marketing
Hours: 45
Room: Verdi
Description: International competition makes international marketing one of the most critical skills for business survival. In their continuing quest for new ways to establish and maintain their competitiveness, many firms are recognizing the advantages of operating in an international market. These benefits include sourcing materials, capital, labor and expertise, relocating manufacturing, and distributing products and services to new markets. While there are many benefits, each company must identify the potentially huge risks taken when operating overseas and the uninformed company may suffer tremendous setbacks before realizing any benefits. This course is an application of marketing principles to the complexities of foreign markets. Emphasis is on the various economic, social, and cultural factors that impact on international marketing, the 4 P's (product, price, places of distribution, and promotion) and how these aspects of marketing are influenced by the international business environment.
International Marketing
TUE 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or equivalent
Course code: BUS 312 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: BUS 220 N Introduction to International Marketing
Hours: 45
Room: Donatello
Description: International competition makes international marketing one of the most critical skills for business survival. In their continuing quest for new ways to establish and maintain their competitiveness, many firms are recognizing the advantages of operating in an international market. These benefits include sourcing materials, capital, labor, and expertise, relocating manufacturing, and distributing products and services to new markets. While there are many benefits, each company must identify the potentially huge risks taken when operating overseas. An uninformed company may suffer tremendous setbacks before obtaining any benefits. This course is an application of marketing principles to the complexities of foreign markets. Emphasis is on the various economic, social, and cultural factors that impact on international marketing, the 4 P's (product, price, places of distribution, and promotion) and how these aspects of marketing are influenced by the international business environment.
International Marketing
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or equivalent
Course code: BUS 312 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: BUS 220 N Introduction to International Marketing
Hours: 45
Room: Donatello
Description: International competition makes international marketing one of the most critical skills for business survival. In their continuing quest for new ways to establish and maintain their competitiveness, many firms are recognizing the advantages of operating in an international market. These benefits include sourcing materials, capital, labor, and expertise, relocating manufacturing, and distributing products and services to new markets. While there are many benefits, each company must identify the potentially huge risks taken when operating overseas. An uninformed company may suffer tremendous setbacks before obtaining any benefits. This course is an application of marketing principles to the complexities of foreign markets. Emphasis is on the various economic, social, and cultural factors that impact on international marketing, the 4 P's (product, price, places of distribution, and promotion) and how these aspects of marketing are influenced by the international business environment.
International Marketing
MON 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 203
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or equivalent
Course code: BUS 312 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: BUS 220 N Introduction to International Marketing
Hours: 45
Room: Stone
Description: International competition makes international marketing one of the most critical skills for business survival. In their continuing quest for new ways to establish and maintain their competitiveness, many firms are recognizing the advantages of operating in an international market. These benefits include sourcing materials, capital, labor, and expertise, relocating manufacturing, and distributing products and services to new markets. While there are many benefits, each company must identify the potentially huge risks taken when operating overseas. An uninformed company may suffer tremendous setbacks before obtaining any benefits. This course is an application of marketing principles to the complexities of foreign markets. Emphasis is on the various economic, social, and cultural factors that impact on international marketing, the 4 P's (product, price, places of distribution, and promotion) and how these aspects of marketing are influenced by the international business environment.
International Marketing
MON to THU 4:15 PM-6:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or equivalent
Course code: BUS 312 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: BUS 220 N: Introduction to International Marketing
Hours: 48
Room: Leonardo
Description: International competition makes international marketing one of the most critical skills for business survival. In their continuing quest for new ways to establish and maintain their competitiveness, many firms are recognizing the advantages of operating in an international market. These benefits include sourcing materials, capital, labor, and expertise, relocating manufacturing, and distributing products and services to new markets. While there are many benefits, each company must identify the potentially huge risks taken when operating overseas. An uninformed company may suffer tremendous setbacks before obtaining any benefits. This course is an application of marketing principles to the complexities of foreign markets. Emphasis is on the various economic, social, and cultural factors that impact on international marketing, the 4 P's (product, price, places of distribution, and promotion) and how these aspects of marketing are influenced by the international business environment.
Integrated Marketing Communication
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents. Recommended: COM 204 Advertising Principles, or equivalent
Course code: BUS 313 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: BUS 352 L Integrated Marketing Communications
Hours: 45
Room: Marco Polo
Dual Listing: COM 313 F
Description: Marketing communication is one of the most exciting and stimulating areas in modern marketing. Its importance has grown dramatically in recent decades. The means through which we communicate all around the world have been affected by the new technological advances. These advances, such as the Internet, have enabled and eased interaction on a global scale. Therefore, marketers are looking for new means of communication that can better gain the attention of customers. This course will examine the theory and techniques applicable today to all the major marketing communication functions. Students will research and evaluate a company’s marketing and promotional situation and use this information in developing effective communication strategies and programs.
Integrated Marketing Communication
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents. Recommended: COM 204 Advertising Principles, or equivalent
Course code: BUS 313 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: BUS 352 L Integrated Marketing Communications
Hours: 45
Room: Galileo
Dual Listing: COM 313 F
Description: Marketing communication is one of the most exciting and stimulating areas in modern marketing. Its importance has grown dramatically in recent decades. The means through which we communicate all around the world have been affected by the new technological advances. These advances, such as the Internet, have enabled and eased interaction on a global scale. Therefore, marketers are looking for new means of communication that can better gain the attention of customers. This course will examine the theory and techniques applicable today to all the major marketing communication functions. Students will research and evaluate a company’s marketing and promotional situation and use this information in developing effective communication strategies and programs.
Integrated Marketing Communication
WED 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents. Recommended: COM 204 Advertising Principles, or equivalent
Course code: BUS 313 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: BUS 352 L Integrated Marketing Communications
Hours: 45
Room: Galileo
Dual Listing: COM 313 F
Description: Marketing communication is one of the most exciting and stimulating areas in modern marketing. Its importance has grown dramatically in recent decades. The means through which we communicate all around the world have been affected by the new technological advances. These advances, such as the Internet, have enabled and eased interaction on a global scale. Therefore, marketers are looking for new means of communication that can better gain the attention of customers. This course will examine the theory and techniques applicable today to all the major marketing communication functions. Students will research and evaluate a company’s marketing and promotional situation and use this information in developing effective communication strategies and programs.
Crowdfunding
MON 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or COM 204 Advertising Principles, or equivalents, or Information majors of junior standing
Course code: BUS 314 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: CLDM 314 L Crowdfunding
Hours: 45
Room: Dante
Dual Listing: COM 314 F
Description: The purpose of the course is to provide students with a sound holistic view of crowdfunding: what it is, what its purpose is, how to take advantage of it or utilize it for projects or businesses, the essential key tips to plan, structure and run a successful campaign, and how to interact and make a campaign even more successful. The course will explain the crowdfunding process and the types of crowdfunding available, and it will focus on examining how the crowdfunding movement has changed the way in which startups and entrepreneurs can get their work to the public. Students will learn the characteristics of successful versus unsuccessful crowdfunding campaigns, and will also be able to analyze which crowdfunding platforms suit specific projects. Students will also examine the role of culture and context, by observing how and why different countries respond and participate in different ways in the crowdfunding phenomenon. At the end of the course, students will feel comfortable and confident with the concept of crowdfunding and will possess the necessary “know how” to develop an effective crowdfunding campaign strategy.
Social Media Marketing
MON to THU 1:15 PM-3:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or equivalent
Course code: BUS 316 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: COM 388 L Special Topics
Hours: 45
Room: Leonardo
Dual Listing: COM 316 F
Description: This course covers the planning and integration of social media into marketing plans and it will explain how to build winning strategies and how to track their effectiveness. This includes learning about fundamental marketing concepts that are relevant to the digital world and acquiring new skills for creating and implementing successful marketing campaigns, online strategies and operations pursued through new media. Students will be introduced to the most popular social media platforms and will learn about the differences between specific media tools and the different purposes of operations pursued through each of them and their proper use to expand business and engage with online customers. In this course, students will be able to build effective digital tactics and gain skills to become social media managers.
Social Media Marketing
MON to THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or equivalent
Course code: BUS 316 R
Campus: Rome
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: COM 388 L: Special Topics
Hours: 45
Room: Costantino
Dual Listing: COM 316 R
Description: This course covers the planning and integration of social media into marketing plans and it will explain how to build winning strategies and how to track their effectiveness. This includes learning about fundamental marketing concepts that are relevant to the digital world and acquiring new skills for creating and implementing successful marketing campaigns, online strategies and operations pursued through new media. Students will be introduced to the most popular social media platforms and will learn about the differences between specific media tools and the different purposes of operations pursued through each of them and their proper use to expand business and engage with online customers. In this course, students will be able to build effective digital tactics and gain skills to become social media managers.
International Business Negotiation
MON 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: Junior standing
Course code: BUS 322 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title:
Hours: 45
Room: Fellini
Description: Over the last two decades, the rise of new powers and the emergence of the Internet have drastically changed and reshaped the face of the global economy. As the world becomes more interconnected and businesses more innovative and competitive, the demand for competent and professional negotiators has increased. This course provides the students with the skills needed to communicate and negotiate effectively in the context of international business transactions. Through class lectures and practical simulations, students will learn to prepare, conduct, and manage a successful negotiation process, cope with cultural differences, and deal with the challenges of contemporary local and global markets. Specific case studies will be analyzed and discussed throughout the semester.
Corporate Finance
MON 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: 1) MAT 150 Calculus I or Calculus with Management Applications; 2) An introductory accounting course; 3) BUS 222 Principles of Finance. Mathematical aptitude is required
Course code: BUS 345 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: BUS 344 N Corporate Finance
Hours: 45
Room: Marco Polo
Description: This course deals with relevant topics in corporate finance from the perspective of financial managers who are responsible for making significant investment and financing decisions. The course covers subjects that are important to decision-making in marketing, operations management, and corporate strategy. Topics will include leasing and leveraged buyouts, dividend policies, capital market efficiency, capital budgeting, financial analysis and forecasting, etc. Because of the practical importance of the material and as an illustration of the relevant theory, examples and cases will be discussed.
Luxury Brand Management
TUE 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing or FAS 215 Fashion Marketing or equivalents, or Business, Management, Marketing or Merchandising majors of junior standing
Course code: BUS 352 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: FASH 455 N Global Merchandising
Hours: 45
Room: Leonardo
Dual Listing: FAS 352 F
Description: This course offers students an opportunity to develop a deeper understanding of luxury, a multi-billion dollar market for branded luxury goods and services. Students examine luxury brand management both as a concept and as global reality while addressing historical development, political, economic, and social aspects, and the continued impetus for design, pop culture, and the arts. Exploring how luxury brands are evolving and their identities in terms of desire, status, and exclusivity, including supply and demand, consumption, and value, helps to explain how luxury brands resist global economic recession. The challenges of building, protecting and strengthening a brand are examined from a broad range of diverse products. The course addresses the economic management and the distribution channels of a brand. Exploring a wide range of case studies, not limited to fashion, students learn management essentials from the luxury perspective, applying the critical tools that make the difference in developing successful strategic plans and management.
Luxury Brand Management
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 102
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing or FAS 215 Fashion Marketing or equivalents, or Business, Management, Marketing or Merchandising majors of junior standing
Course code: BUS 352 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: FASH 455 N Global Merchandising
Hours: 45
Room: Leonardo
Dual Listing: FAS 352 F
Description: This course offers students an opportunity to develop a deeper understanding of luxury, a multi-billion dollar market for branded luxury goods and services. Students examine luxury brand management both as a concept and as global reality while addressing historical development, political, economic, and social aspects, and the continued impetus for design, pop culture, and the arts. Exploring how luxury brands are evolving and their identities in terms of desire, status, and exclusivity, including supply and demand, consumption, and value, helps to explain how luxury brands resist global economic recession. The challenges of building, protecting and strengthening a brand are examined from a broad range of diverse products. The course addresses the economic management and the distribution channels of a brand. Exploring a wide range of case studies, not limited to fashion, students learn management essentials from the luxury perspective, applying the critical tools that make the difference in developing successful strategic plans and management.
Luxury Brand Management
TUE 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing or FAS 215 Fashion Marketing or equivalents, or Business, Management, Marketing or Merchandising majors of junior standing
Course code: BUS 352 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: FASH 455 N Global Merchandising
Hours: 45
Room: Marconi
Dual Listing: FAS 352 F
Description: This course offers students an opportunity to develop a deeper understanding of luxury, a multi-billion dollar market for branded luxury goods and services. Students examine luxury brand management both as a concept and as global reality while addressing historical development, political, economic, and social aspects, and the continued impetus for design, pop culture, and the arts. Exploring how luxury brands are evolving and their identities in terms of desire, status, and exclusivity, including supply and demand, consumption, and value, helps to explain how luxury brands resist global economic recession. The challenges of building, protecting and strengthening a brand are examined from a broad range of diverse products. The course addresses the economic management and the distribution channels of a brand. Exploring a wide range of case studies, not limited to fashion, students learn management essentials from the luxury perspective, applying the critical tools that make the difference in developing successful strategic plans and management.
Luxury Brand Management
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 202
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing or FAS 215 Fashion Marketing or equivalents, or Business, Management, Marketing or Merchandising majors of junior standing
Course code: BUS 352 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: FASH 455 N Global Merchandising
Hours: 45
Room: Stone
Dual Listing: FAS 352 F
Description: This course offers students an opportunity to develop a deeper understanding of luxury, a multi-billion dollar market for branded luxury goods and services. Students examine luxury brand management both as a concept and as global reality while addressing historical development, political, economic, and social aspects, and the continued impetus for design, pop culture, and the arts. Exploring how luxury brands are evolving and their identities in terms of desire, status, and exclusivity, including supply and demand, consumption, and value, helps to explain how luxury brands resist global economic recession. The challenges of building, protecting and strengthening a brand are examined from a broad range of diverse products. The course addresses the economic management and the distribution channels of a brand. Exploring a wide range of case studies, not limited to fashion, students learn management essentials from the luxury perspective, applying the critical tools that make the difference in developing successful strategic plans and management.
Luxury Brand Management
MON to THU 4:15 PM-6:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing or FAS 215 Fashion Marketing or equivalents, or Business, Management, Marketing or Merchandising majors of junior standing
Course code: BUS 352 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: FASH 455 N Global Merchandising
Hours: 45
Room: Machiavelli
Dual Listing: FAS 352 F
Description: This course offers students an opportunity to develop a deeper understanding of luxury, a multi-billion dollar market for branded luxury goods and services. Students examine luxury brand management both as a concept and as global reality while addressing historical development, political, economic, and social aspects, and the continued impetus for design, pop culture, and the arts. Exploring how luxury brands are evolving and their identities in terms of desire, status, and exclusivity, including supply and demand, consumption, and value, helps to explain how luxury brands resist global economic recession. The challenges of building, protecting and strengthening a brand are examined from a broad range of diverse products. The course addresses the economic management and the distribution channels of a brand. Exploring a wide range of case studies, not limited to fashion, students learn management essentials from the luxury perspective, applying the critical tools that make the difference in developing successful strategic plans and management.
Marketing/Advertising Internship
-
Section: 101
FULL
Prerequisites: 1) Marketing/Advertising majors of junior standing with at least 2-3 prior courses in the field; 2) Concurrent enrollment in a course in the same field. Recommended: Social networking experience. Fluency in Italian may be advantageous, but is not required
Notes: min. 135 hrs INTERNSHIP. Placement opportunities are limited. Admission contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, formal letter of intent, sample of marketing work (due by application deadline) and onsite interview. Public transport costs may apply. Student taking an internship must retain full-time status, with a minimum of 15 credits per semester.
Course code: BUS 361 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: TBA
Marist Code/Title: BUS 397 N Business Internship
Hours: 135
Room: External
Description: This internship provides practical and professional experience in the fields of Marketing and Advertising. The intern is monitored by both the onsite supervisor and an LdM faculty member. The grade assigned by the faculty internship supervisor reflects the assessment of weekly reports, two papers, and an overall evaluation. Ten/twelve hours weekly at the internship site; student internship schedules and onsite duties may vary. The placement is at a Communications Office. Interns develop and carry out various activities which may include, but are not limited to: market research; developing marketing, price, distribution and promotional strategies; creating advertisements for local and international print and e-publications; newsletters, mailing lists; Web site content and social media management. Note: Placement opportunities are limited and subject to change. Admission is contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, a formal letter of intent, a sample of marketing work (i.e., blog writing, social media campaign example, press release, advertising project). Students who enroll must submit supporting documentation by the application deadline, and acceptance is conditional upon the result of an onsite interview during the first week of the term.
Marketing/Advertising Internship
-
Section: 102
FULL
Prerequisites: 1) Marketing/Advertising majors of junior standing with at least 2-3 prior courses in the field; 2) Concurrent enrollment in a course in the same field. Recommended: Social networking experience. Fluency in Italian may be advantageous, but is not required
Notes: min. 135 hrs INTERNSHIP. Placement opportunities are limited. Admission contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, formal letter of intent, sample of marketing work (due by application deadline) and onsite interview. Public transport costs may apply. Student taking an internship must retain full-time status, with a minimum of 15 credits per semester.
Course code: BUS 361 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: TBA
Marist Code/Title: BUS 397 N Business Internship
Hours: 135
Room: External
Description: This internship provides practical and professional experience in the fields of Marketing and Advertising. The intern is monitored by both the onsite supervisor and an LdM faculty member. The grade assigned by the faculty internship supervisor reflects the assessment of weekly reports, two papers, and an overall evaluation. Ten/twelve hours weekly at the internship site; student internship schedules and onsite duties may vary. The placement is at a Communications Office. Interns develop and carry out various activities which may include, but are not limited to: market research; developing marketing, price, distribution and promotional strategies; creating advertisements for local and international print and e-publications; newsletters, mailing lists; Web site content and social media management. Note: Placement opportunities are limited and subject to change. Admission is contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, a formal letter of intent, a sample of marketing work (i.e., blog writing, social media campaign example, press release, advertising project). Students who enroll must submit supporting documentation by the application deadline, and acceptance is conditional upon the result of an onsite interview during the first week of the term.
Marketing/Advertising Internship
-
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: 1) Marketing/Advertising majors of junior standing with at least 2-3 prior courses in the field; 2) Concurrent enrollment in a course in the same field. Recommended: Social networking experience. Fluency in Italian may be advantageous, but is not required
Notes: min. 135 hrs INTERNSHIP. Placement opportunities are limited. Admission contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, formal letter of intent, sample of marketing work (due by application deadline) and onsite interview. Public transport costs may apply. Student taking an internship must retain full-time status, with a minimum of 15 credits per semester.
Course code: BUS 361 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: TBA
Marist Code/Title: BUS 397 N Business Internship
Hours: 135
Room: External
Description: This internship provides practical and professional experience in the fields of Marketing and Advertising. The intern is monitored by both the onsite supervisor and an LdM faculty member. The grade assigned by the faculty internship supervisor reflects the assessment of weekly reports, two papers, and an overall evaluation. Ten/twelve hours weekly at the internship site; student internship schedules and onsite duties may vary. The placement is at a Communications Office. Interns develop and carry out various activities which may include, but are not limited to: market research; developing marketing, price, distribution and promotional strategies; creating advertisements for local and international print and e-publications; newsletters, mailing lists; Web site content and social media management. Note: Placement opportunities are limited and subject to change. Admission is contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, a formal letter of intent, a sample of marketing work (i.e., blog writing, social media campaign example, press release, advertising project). Students who enroll must submit supporting documentation by the application deadline, and acceptance is conditional upon the result of an onsite interview during the first week of the term.
Social Media Marketing Internship
-
Section: 101
FULL
Prerequisites: 1) Marketing / Communications majors of junior standing with at least 2-3 prior courses in the field; 2) Concurrent enrollment in a course in the same field. Recommended: Social networking experience and strong photography skills. Fluency in Italian may be advantageous, but is not required
Notes: min. 135 hrs INTERNSHIP. Placement opportunities are limited. Admission contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, formal letter of intent, samples of writing and marketing work (due by application deadline) and onsite interview. Student taking an internship must retain full-time status, with a minimum of 15 credits per semester.
Course code: BUS 369 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via Faenza, 43
Marist Code/Title: COM 388 L ST: Social Media Marketing
Hours: 135
Room: Marketing Office
Dual Listing: COM 370 F
Description: This internship provides practical and professional experience in the field of Social Media Marketing. The intern is monitored by both the on-site supervisor and an LdM faculty member. The grade assigned by the faculty internship supervisor reflects the assessment of weekly reports, two papers, and an overall evaluation. Ten/twelve hours weekly at the internship site; student internship schedules and on site duties may vary. The placement is with the LdM Social Media Office or with advertising or communication agencies. Interns develop and carry out various activities, which may include, but are not limited to: market research based on social media; marketing strategy focused on promotional strategy and advertisement strategy; developing and managing photo archives, the LdM alumni network – which establishes online communication tools for alumni; managing the online database. Note: Placement opportunities are limited and subject to change. Admission is contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, a formal letter of intent, and samples of writing and marketing work (i.e., blog writing, social media campaign example, press release, advertising project, photos). Students who enroll must submit supporting documentation by the application deadline, and acceptance is conditional upon the result of an on-site interview during the first week of the term.
Social Media Marketing Internship
-
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: 1) Marketing / Communications majors of junior standing with at least 2-3 prior courses in the field; 2) Concurrent enrollment in a course in the same field. Recommended: Social networking experience and strong photography skills. Fluency in Italian may be advantageous, but is not required
Notes: min. 135 hrs INTERNSHIP. Placement opportunities are limited. Admission contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, formal letter of intent, samples of writing and marketing work (due by application deadline) and onsite interview. Student taking an internship must retain full-time status, with a minimum of 15 credits per semester.
Course code: BUS 369 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: TBA
Marist Code/Title:
Hours: 135
Room: External
Dual Listing: COM 370 F
Description: This internship provides practical and professional experience in the field of Social Media Marketing. The intern is monitored by both the on-site supervisor and an LdM faculty member. The grade assigned by the faculty internship supervisor reflects the assessment of weekly reports, two papers, and an overall evaluation. Ten/twelve hours weekly at the internship site; student internship schedules and on site duties may vary. The placement is with the LdM Social Media Office or with advertising or communication agencies. Interns develop and carry out various activities, which may include, but are not limited to: market research based on social media; marketing strategy focused on promotional strategy and advertisement strategy; developing and managing photo archives, the LdM alumni network – which establishes online communication tools for alumni; managing the online database. Note: Placement opportunities are limited and subject to change. Admission is contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, a formal letter of intent, and samples of writing and marketing work (i.e., blog writing, social media campaign example, press release, advertising project, photos). Students who enroll must submit supporting documentation by the application deadline, and acceptance is conditional upon the result of an on-site interview during the first week of the term.
Global Financial Markets
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 222 Principles of Finance, or equivalent. Mathematical aptitude is required
Course code: BUS 380 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: BUS 363 N Global Financial Markets
Hours: 45
Room: Marconi
Description: This course offers a broad introduction to the workings of the global financial system, the dynamics of the main financial markets (US, Europe, and Asia), the nature and the goals of the key financial institutions and the crucial role played by central banks and regulatory agencies. An important part of the course focuses on the global economic and financial crisis, reviewing its causes and consequences, as well as evaluating the merits of the numerous government intervention schemes. The course ends with an assessment of the dramatic changes taking place in the global financial architecture as a result of the recent crisis.
Global Financial Markets
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 222 Principles of Finance, or equivalent. Mathematical aptitude is required
Course code: BUS 380 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: BUS 363 N Global Financial Markets
Hours: 45
Room: Caravaggio
Description: This course offers a broad introduction to the workings of the global financial system, the dynamics of the main financial markets (U.S., Europe, and Asia), the nature and the goals of the key financial institutions and the crucial role played by central banks and regulatory agencies. An important part of the course focuses on the global economic and financial crisis, reviewing its causes and consequences, as well as evaluating the merits of the numerous government intervention schemes. The course ends with an assessment of the dramatic changes taking place in the global financial architecture as a result of the recent crisis
Operations Management
MON 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: 1) MAT 150 Calculus I, or Calculus with Management Applications; 2) MAT 186 Introduction to Statistics; 3) Accounting or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or equivalents. Recommended: BUS 178 Principles of Microeconomics and BUS 180 Principles of Macroeconomics, or equivalents
Notes: personal laptop required
Course code: BUS 388 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: BUS 388 N Operations Management
Hours: 45
Room: Dante
Description: Topics common to both production and service operations are emphasized. Includes quantitative decision-making techniques; forecasting; various planning techniques involved in capacity, location, and process; resource and materials planning; and the design of job and work measurement systems. Also included are inventory systems and models, materials management, and quality-control methods.
Operations Management
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: 1) MAT 150 Calculus I, or Calculus with Management Applications; 2) MAT 186 Introduction to Statistics; 3) Accounting or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or equivalents. Recommended: BUS 178 Principles of Microeconomics and BUS 180 Principles of Macroeconomics, or equivalents
Notes: personal laptop required
Course code: BUS 388 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: BUS 388 N Operations Management
Hours: 45
Room: Stone
Description: Topics common to both production and service operations are emphasized. Includes quantitative decision-making techniques; forecasting; various planning techniques involved in capacity, location, and process; resource and materials planning; and the design of job and work measurement systems. Also included are inventory systems and models, materials management, and quality-control methods.
Operations Management
MON 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 202
OPEN
Prerequisites: 1) MAT 150 Calculus I, or Calculus with Management Applications; 2) MAT 186 Introduction to Statistics; 3) Accounting or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or equivalents. Recommended: BUS 178 Principles of Microeconomics and BUS 180 Principles of Macroeconomics, or equivalents
Notes: personal laptop required
Course code: BUS 388 F
Campus: Florence
Department: International Business
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: BUS 388 N Operations Management
Hours: 45
Room: Stone
Description: Topics common to both production and service operations are emphasized. Includes quantitative decision-making techniques; forecasting; various planning techniques involved in capacity, location, and process; resource and materials planning; and the design of job and work measurement systems. Also included are inventory systems and models, materials management, and quality-control methods.
General Chemistry I with Laboratory
MON 3:00 PM-4:15 PM & WED 3:00 PM-4:15 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: MAT 130 Topics in Mathematics for Liberal Arts, or equivalent
Notes: Lab held TUE 3:30-6:30pm starting the second week. Includes a compulsory safety training and exam on TUE Sept 4, 3:00-7:00PM and FRI Sept 7, 10:00AM-2:00PM. Lab fee and travel fare apply. Taught in collaboration with University of Florence. 6 recitation sessions on selected THURSDAYS - Exact dates/time TBA.
Course code: CHM 135 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Chemistry
Credits: 4
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: CHEM 131 L General Chemistry I
Hours: 45
Room: Dante
Description: This course provides an introduction to the fundamental theories of inorganic chemistry including the structure of atoms, electronic structure, bonding, reactions in aqueous media, gas behavior, intermolecular forces, and properties of solutions. The three-hour weekly laboratory session demonstrates the lecture material and emphasizes laboratory technique, data treatment, and report writing.
LAB Session for General Chemistry I
TUE 3:30 PM-6:30 PM
Section: LAB
OPEN
Notes: Lab starts the second week.
Course code: CHM 135L F
Campus: Florence
Department: Chemistry
Credits: 0
Premises: Sesto Fiorentino
Marist Code/Title: No Marist Credit
Hours: 39
Room: Polo Scientifico e Tecnologico
Description: The three-hour weekly laboratory session demonstrates the lecture material and emphasizes laboratory technique, data treatment, and report writing.
RECITATION for General Chemistry I
THU 5:55 PM-8:00 PM
Section: REC
OPEN
Notes: 6 recitation sessions on selected THURSDAYS. Exact dates/time TBA.
Course code: CHM 135R F
Campus: Florence
Department: Chemistry
Credits: 0
Premises: Via del Giglio, 4
Marist Code/Title: No Marist Credit
Hours: 15
Room: Eschini
Description: Recitation sessions for chemistry students, on selected days. Tipically 6 meetings of 2,5 hrs each. See detailed schedule on the relevant syllabus, or distributed in class. Optional but strongly recommended.
General Chemistry II with Laboratory
WED 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: Grade of C or higher in CHM 135 General Chemistry I with Laboratory, or equivalent
Notes: lab held MONDAYS 3:30 - 6:30 PM starting the second week. Requires a mandatory safety training and exam, dates TBA. Recitation sessions are highly recommended. See syllabus for details. Please note that recitation schedules may vary from Monday through Friday. Lab fee required. Public transport costs apply. Taught in collaboration with University of Florence
Course code: CHM 136 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Chemistry
Credits: 4
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: CHEM 132 L General Chemistry with Lab II
Hours: 45
Room: Dante
Description: This course provides an introduction to the principles of physical chemistry (thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium, acid-base chemistry, kinetics, and electrochemistry) as well as to coordination chemistry. The three-hour weekly laboratory session demonstrates the lecture material and emphasizes laboratory technique, data treatment, and report writing.
LAB Session for General Chemistry II
MON 3:30 PM-6:30 PM
Section: 201L
OPEN
Notes: lab starting the second week. Requires a mandatory safety training and exam, dates TBA. Lab fee required. Public transport costs apply. Taught in collaboration with University of Florence
Course code: CHM 136L F
Campus: Florence
Department: Chemistry
Credits: 0
Premises: Sesto Fiorentino
Marist Code/Title: CHEM 132 L General Chemistry with Lab II
Hours: 39
Room: Polo Scientifico e Tecnologico
Description: Mandatory laboratory portion for CHM 136. The three-hour weekly laboratory session demonstrates the lecture material and emphasizes laboratory technique, data treatment, and report writing.
Organic Chemistry I with Laboratory
WED 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: Grade of C or higher in CHM 135 and 136 General Chemistry I & II with Laboratory, or equivalent
Notes: Lab held TUE 3:30-6:30pm starting the third week. Includes a compulsory safety training and exam on TUE Sept 4, 3:00-7:00PM and FRI Sept 7, 10:00AM-2:00PM. Lab fee and travel fare apply. Taught in collaboration with University of Florence. 6 recitation sessions on selected THURSDAYS
Course code: CHM 221 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Chemistry
Credits: 4
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: CHEM 211 PLUS CHEM 215 L Organic Chemistry I plus Organic Chemistry I plus lab
Hours: 45
Room: Stone
Description: This course is the first part of a two-semester introductory sequence to organic chemistry. The course provides a thorough understanding of the relationship between structures, properties, functionalities, and resulting reactions of organic compounds. The compounds covered include alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alkyl halides, alcohols, and ethers, which are studied with regards to nomenclature, stereochemistry, stability, reaction mechanism, and structural analysis with spectroscopic methods. Accompanying three-hour weekly laboratory sessions provide hands-on experience that consolidates and expands upon theory and concepts learned, with training in relevant techniques such as purification, synthesis, and analytical methods.
LAB Session for Organic Chemistry I
TUE 3:30 PM-6:30 PM
Section: LAB
OPEN
Notes: Lab starts the third week.
Course code: CHM 221L F
Campus: Florence
Department: Chemistry
Credits: 0
Premises: Sesto Fiorentino
Marist Code/Title: No Marist Credit
Hours: 39
Room: Polo Scientifico e Tecnologico
Description: The three-hour weekly laboratory sessions is hands-on experience that consolidates and expands upon the theories and concepts learned, with training in relevant techniques, such as purification, synthesis, and analytical methods.
RECITATION for Organic Chemistry I
THU 9:55 AM-12:00 NOON
Section: REC
OPEN
Notes: 6 recitation sessions on selected THURSDAYS. Exact dates/time TBA.
Course code: CHM 221R F
Campus: Florence
Department: Chemistry
Credits: 0
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: No Marist Credit
Hours: 15
Room: Tiziano
Description: Recitation sessions for chemistry students, on selected days. Tipically 6 meetings of 2,5 hrs each. See detailed schedule on the relevant syllabus, or distributed in class. Optional but strongly recommended.
Organic Chemistry II with Laboratory
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: Grade of C or higher in CHM 221 Organic Chemistry I with Laboratory, or equivalent
Notes: lab held WEDNESDAYS 3:30 - 6:30 PM starting the second week. Requires a mandatory safety training and exam, dates TBA. Recitation sessions are highly recommended. See syllabus for details. Please note that recitation schedules may vary from Monday through Friday. Lab fee required. Public transport costs apply. Taught in collaboration with University of Florence
Course code: CHM 222 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Chemistry
Credits: 4
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: CHEM 212 & CHEM 216 L Organic Chemistry Il plus Organic Chemistry Il plus lab
Hours: 45
Room: Dante
Description: This course is the second part of a two-semester introductory sequence to organic chemistry. The course provides the extension of the principles of the relationship between structures, properties, functionalities, and resulting reactions of organic compounds. The compounds covered include alcohols, ethers, conjugated system, amines, carbonyl derivatives, and others. The course focuses on reaction mechanisms, stereochemistry, multiple step synthesis, and advanced spectroscopic analytics. Accompanying three-hour weekly laboratory sessions is hands-on experience that solidifies and expands upon the theories and concepts learned, with training in various techniques of separation, synthesis, and analysis.
Organic Chemistry II with Laboratory
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: Grade of C or higher in CHM 221 Organic Chemistry I with Laboratory, or equivalent
Notes: lab section may be scheduled on any weekday (from MON at 9:00 AM to FRI at 2:00 PM). The timeframe of the science lecture/lab is subject to adjustments and will be confirmed by the start of the term. Concurrent enrollment in HIS/PHI 281 Italy's Contribution to Modern Science mandatory for STEM majors. Minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA required. Specific STEM attendance and grading policies apply. Lab fee required. Public transport costs apply. Taught in collaboration with Università Roma Tre.
Course code: CHM 222 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Chemistry
Credits: 4
Premises: Viale G. Marconi 446
Marist Code/Title: CHEM 212 L & CHEM 216 L Organic Chemistry Il plus Organic Chemistry Il plus lab
Hours: 45
Room: Università Roma Tre
Description: This course is the second part of a two-semester introductory sequence to organic chemistry. The course provides the extension of the principles of the relationship between structures, properties, functionalities, and the resulting reactions of organic compounds. The compounds covered include alcohols, ethers, conjugated system, amines, carbonyl derivatives, and others. The course focuses on reaction mechanisms, stereochemistry, multiple step synthesis, and advanced spectroscopic analytics. Accompanying three-hour weekly laboratory session provides hands-on experience that consolidates and expands upon the theories and concepts learned, with training in various techniques of separation, synthesis, and analysis. This course is for science majors only. Taught in collaboration with Università Roma Tre. Note: Specific STEM attendance and grading policies apply.
LAB Session for Organic Chemistry II
WED 3:30 PM-6:30 PM
Section: 201L
OPEN
Notes: lab starting the second week. Requires a mandatory safety training and exam, dates TBA. Lab fee required. Public transport costs apply. Taught in collaboration with University of Florence
Course code: CHM 222L F
Campus: Florence
Department: Chemistry
Credits: 0
Premises: Sesto Fiorentino
Marist Code/Title: CHEM 212 & CHEM 216 L Organic Chemistry Il plus Organic Chemistry Il plus lab
Hours: 39
Room: Polo Scientifico e Tecnologico
Description: Mandatory laboratory portion for CHM 222. Weekly three-hour laboratory sessions provide hands-on experience that consolidate and expand upon the theory and concepts learned, with training in various techniques for separation, synthesis, and analysis.
LAB Session for Organic Chemistry II
WED 4:00 PM-7:00 PM
Section: LAB
OPEN
Notes: lab fee required. Taught in collaboration with Università Roma Tre.
Course code: CHM 222L R
Campus: Rome
Department: Chemistry
Credits: 0
Premises: Viale G. Marconi 446
Marist Code/Title: CHEM 212 L & CHEM 216 L Organic Chemistry Il plus Organic Chemistry Il plus lab
Hours: 45
Room: Università Roma Tre
Description: Mandatory laboratory portion for CHM 222. Weekly three-hour laboratory sessions provide hands-on experience that consolidates and expands upon the theory and concepts learned, with training in various techniques for separation, synthesis, and analysis.
Principles of Biochemistry
MON 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: CHM 221 Organic Chemistry I with Laboratory and General Biology I, or equivalents
Notes: Concurrent enrollment in HIS/PHI 281 Italy's Contribution to Modern Science mandatory for STEM majors. Minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA required. Specific STEM attendance and grading policies apply.
Course code: CHM 330 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Chemistry
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title:
Hours: 45
Room: TBA
Dual Listing: BIO 330 R
Description: This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the concepts of biochemistry. It focuses on understanding the structure, synthesis and metabolism of the major biomolecules: nucleotides, lipids, proteins and carbohydrates. Furthermore, it explores the biochemical principles of genetics, enzyme function and other signaling functions in the body. Note: Specific STEM attendance and grading policies apply.
Science for Conservators II
TUE 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: CHM 135 General Chemistry I with Laboratory, or equivalents
Course code: CHM 340 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Chemistry
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: CHEM 380 L Science for Conservators II
Hours: 45
Room: Dante
Dual Listing: RES 340 F
Description: Addresses the scientific concepts and the nature of materials concerning the conservation and restoration of works of art that are needed by practitioners. Topics include the physical and chemical properties of porous materials, synthetic materials, deterioration and consolidation, the nature of dirt, mechanical cleaning, liquids and solutions, organic solvents, cleaning with water, acidity and alkalinity, and cleaning through chemical reaction.
Public Speaking and Presentation Skills
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
FULL
Course code: COM 105 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Marist Code/Title: COM 101 L Public Presentation
Hours: 45
Room: Firenze
Description: This course provides an introduction to public speaking in group and whole-class situations. It will help students develop their delivery skills as well as the content of their presentations, including the development and organization of ideas and the use of research materials. Students will analyze a variety of speeches, in written and oral formats, and will be required to develop working outlines for their own presentations. Classes will also involve voice and body language exercises and will teach strategies for overcoming performance anxiety.
Public Speaking and Presentation Skills
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
OPEN
Course code: COM 105 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Marist Code/Title: COM 101 L Public Presentation
Hours: 45
Room: Firenze
Description: This course provides an introduction to public speaking in group and whole-class situations. It will help students to develop their delivery skills as well as the content of their presentations, including the development and organization of ideas and use of research material. Students will analyze a variety of speeches, in written and oral formats, and will be required to develop working outlines for their own presentations. Classes will also involve voice and body language exercises and will teach strategies for overcoming performance anxiety.
Public Speaking and Presentation Skills
WED 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
Course code: COM 105 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Marist Code/Title: COM 101 L Public Presentation
Hours: 45
Room: Firenze
Description: This course provides an introduction to public speaking in group and whole-class situations. It will help students develop their delivery skills as well as the content of their presentations, including the development and organization of ideas and the use of research materials. Students will analyze a variety of speeches, in written and oral forms, and will be required to develop working outlines for their own presentations. Classes will also involve voice and body language exercises and will teach strategies for overcoming performance anxiety.
Public Speaking and Presentation Skills
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Course code: COM 105 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: COM 101 L Public Presentation
Hours: 45
Room: Marconi
Description: This course provides an introduction to public speaking in group and whole-class situations. It will help students develop their delivery skills as well as the content of their presentations, including the development and organization of ideas and the use of research materials. Students will analyze a variety of speeches, in written and oral forms, and will be required to develop working outlines for their own presentations. Classes will also involve voice and body language exercises and will teach strategies for overcoming performance anxiety.
Public Speaking and Presentation Skills
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Course code: COM 105 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: COM 101 L Public Presentation
Hours: 45
Room: Tito
Description: This course provides an introduction to public speaking in group and whole-class situations. It will help students develop their delivery skills as well as the content of their presentations, including the development and organization of ideas and the use of research materials. Students will analyze a variety of speeches, in written and oral forms, and will be required to develop working outlines for their own presentations. Classes will also involve voice and body language exercises and will teach strategies for overcoming performance anxiety.
Introduction to Communications
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: COM 130 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: COM 102 L Introduction to Communication
Hours: 45
Room: Machiavelli
Description: This course surveys the theories of communication relevant to all contexts (including interpersonal, group, organizational, mediated, and cultural) and the ways in which contexts affect the forms of communication. The course introduces students to essential concepts and fundamental theories that describe the processes, functions, natures, and effects of communication. The general goals of the course are to familiarize students with the basic concepts of communication and to help them understand and improve basic skills in relation to interpersonal communication. Students deal with ethical issues and global opportunities and challenges offered by communication, and they have an opportunity to develop their critical thinking and writing, as well as group work and presentation skills.
Introduction to Communication
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Course code: COM 130 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: COM 102 L Introduction to Communication
Hours: 45
Room: Verdi
Description: This course surveys the theories of communication relevant to all contexts (including interpersonal, group, organizational, mediated, and cultural) and the ways in which contexts affect the form of communication. The course introduces students to essential concepts and fundamental theories that describe the processes, functions, natures, and effects of communication. General goals of the course are to familiarize students with the basic concepts of communication and to help them understand and improve basic skills in relation to interpersonal communication. Students deal with ethical issues and global opportunities and challenges offered by communication, and they have an opportunity to develop their critical thinking and writing, as well as group work and presentation skills.
Mass Communication
WED 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Course code: COM 180 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: COM 201 / CLDM 270 L Communication and Society/ Introduction to Mass Communication
Hours: 45
Room: Donatello
Description: This is an introductory course to mass communication, focusing on a wide range of old and new media. Thus, the major themes will be two: "traditional" media (newspapers, magazines, radio, telephone, motion pictures, TV) and "digital" media (personal computers, Internet, digital TV, social media). Through a "social history" of the development of mass communication much attention will be paid to the "convergence" of old and new, as well as the most relevant marketing topics (product marketing, advertising). The course will show how technological changes have influenced mass media in modern times by increasing their variety and power. Secondly, it will examine how these changes brought about new communication possibilities, either as completely new concepts or in conjunction with existing media. Finally, the main cultural changes resulting from this evolution will be analyzed and discussed with regards to individual and social changes, and the political and economic impact and the role of information in our society. Semiotics is fundamental to approaching mass communication as a wide-scale linguistic phenomenon in which transmitters, receivers, and messages can be identified, analyzed, and critically interpreted at all possible levels.
New Media: Communication in the Digital Age
MON 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: COM 182 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: MDIA 311 L Communication Revolution
Hours: 45
Room: Caravaggio
Description: What do we really mean when we use the term "mass media" today? Is it really the same thing we meant twenty years ago, when television was still the main tool for mass information? The digital age has introduced new communication devices (laptops, digital cameras, smart phones, iPods, iPads) and new virtual places (blogs, chat rooms, social networks, online shops, peer-to-peer platforms), shaped around our wants, though often perceived/imposed on as "needs." Following a two-step program, the student will learn about the causes and effects of the digital revolution: first analyzing features and functions of all main digital communication devices (and places), then discussing their influence on us as citizens, artists, professionals, individuals.
New Media: Communication in the Digital Age
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Course code: COM 182 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: MDIA 311 L Communication Revolution
Hours: 45
Room: Dante
Description: What do we really mean when we use the term "mass media" today? Is it really the same thing we could have meant twenty years ago, when television was still the main tool for mass information? The digital age has introduced new communication devices (laptops, digital cameras, smart phones, iPods, iPads) and new virtual places (blogs, chat rooms, social networks, online shops, peer-to-peer platforms), shaped around our wants, though often perceived/imposed as "needs." Following a two-step program, the student will learn about causes and effects of the digital revolution: first analyzing features and functions of all main digital communication devices (and places), then discussing their influence on us as citizens, artists, professionals, individuals.
Advertising Principles
TUE 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: COM 180 Mass Communication, or BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or equivalents
Course code: COM 204 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: COM 220 Intro to Strategic Advertising
Hours: 45
Room: Tiziano
Description: Advertising is not a simple or random combination of images in an ad. The task of advertising is to build a positive perception of the product in the consumer's mind. Every commercial, every ad in magazines, every TV advertisement is designed to deliver a particular message to a particular audience. This course will deal with contemporary advertising and also with the media and graphic modes used to convey it. Topics include the philosophy of advertising and its role in society; how advertising relates to life, society and economy; current trends in advertising as viewed from creative, marketing and media standpoints; the stereotypes that advertising instills in us and the reaction of our society to these suggestions; how advertising is made, created, and projected.
Advertising Principles
THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: COM 180 Mass Communication, or BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or equivalents
Course code: COM 204 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: COM 220 L Intro to Strategic Advertising
Hours: 45
Room: Dante
Description: Advertising is not a simple or random combination of images in an ad. The task of advertising is to build a positive perception of the product in the consumer's mind. Every commercial, every ad in magazines, every TV advertisement is designed to deliver a particular message to a particular audience. This course will deal with contemporary advertising and also with the media and graphic modes used to convey it. Topics include the philosophy of advertising and its role in society; how advertising relates to life, society and economy; current trends in advertising as viewed from the creative, marketing and media standpoints; the stereotypes that advertising proposes to us and the reaction of our society to these suggestions; how advertising is made, created and projected.
Body Language and Communication Techniques
TUE 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: COM 212 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Marist Code/Title: CLDM 110 L Body Language and Communication
Hours: 45
Room: Firenze
Description: This course enables students to understand and manage body language, and generally increase their relational and communicative capacities, preparing them to enter the working world and achieve greater professional and social success. Students develop expertise relating to verbal and non-verbal communication. Training involves working individually and in groups, and addresses motivation as well as the control of body language. The “learning by doing” methodology engages students in a practical and proactive way through exercises and improvisation, which help them evaluate their individual attitudes and capacities. A blend of participative and creative activities is employed, including theater techniques for non-verbal communication, improvisations, team building, self-presentations, body language exercises, and movement exercises. The course guides each student in the discovery of personal strengths and the activation of a personal plan to develop their expectations and capacities.
Body Language and Communication Techniques
MON 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Course code: COM 212 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: CLDM 110 L Body Language and Communication
Hours: 45
Room: Caravaggio
Description: This course enables students to understand and manage body language, and generally increase their relational and communicative capacities, preparing them to enter the working world and achieve greater professional and social success. Students develop expertise relating to verbal and non-verbal communication. Training involves working individually and in groups, and addresses motivation as well as the control of body language. The “learning by doing” methodology engages students in a practical and proactive way through exercises and improvisation, which help them evaluate their individual attitudes and capacities. A blend of participative and creative activities is employed, including theater techniques for non-verbal communication, improvisations, team building, self-presentations, body language exercises, and movement exercises. The course guides each student in the discovery of personal strengths and the activation of a personal plan to develop their expectations and capacities.
Body Language and Communication Techniques
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Course code: COM 212 T
Campus: Tuscania
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Largo della Rocca 7
Marist Code/Title: CLDM 110L Body Language and Communication
Hours: 45
Room: Tymicha
Description: This course enables students to understand and manage body language, and generally increase their relational and communicative capacities, preparing them to enter the working world and achieve greater professional and social success. Students develop expertise relating to verbal and non-verbal communication. Training involves working individually and in groups, and addresses motivation as well as the control of body language. The “learning by doing” methodology engages students in a practical and proactive way through exercises and improvisation, which help them evaluate their individual attitudes and capacities. A blend of participative and creative activities is employed, including theater techniques for non-verbal communication, improvisations, team building, self-presentations, body language exercises, and movement exercises. The course guides each student in the discovery of personal strengths and the activation of a personal plan to develop their expectations and capacities.
Communications Research Methods
MON 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: COM 130 Introduction to Communication, or equivalent
Course code: COM 225 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: COM 200 L Communication Res Meth
Hours: 45
Room: Leonardo
Description: This course introduces students to the practice of communications research in academic and applied settings. The emphasis will be on how to identify, evaluate, and apply research findings to communication needs. It grounds students in fundamentals of research design and strategy, data gathering, and analysis for a variety of qualitative and quantitative communications research methodologies.
Communications Research Methods
TUE 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: COM 130 Introduction to Communication, or equivalent
Course code: COM 225 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: COM 200 L Communitcation Res Methods
Hours: 45
Room: Caravaggio
Description: This course introduces students to the practice of communications research in academic and applied settings. The emphasis will be on how to identify, evaluate, and apply research findings to communication needs. It grounds students in fundamentals of research design and strategy, data gathering, and analysis for a variety of qualitative and quantitative communications research methodologies.
Event Planning
MON 6:00 PM-7:40 PM & WED 6:00 PM-7:40 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Notes: contact hours may include a mandatory final event held outside regular class hours. The day/time of the event will be announced early in the term.
Course code: COM 232 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: FASH 261 N Event Planning
Hours: 60
Room: Donatello
Dual Listing: BUS 232 F
Description: This course introduces students to special event planning processes and techniques. Emphasis is on creating, organizing, identifying sponsors, marketing, and implementing large-scale community events. We will explore this very detail-oriented field as it deals with vendors, contracts, fundraising, budgeting, ethics, and other aspects. Students will research products, competition, and target markets to determine best possible exposure and success. As part of the course students may organize a real event in interdisciplinary collaboration with other departments.
Event Planning
MON 9:00 AM-10:40 AM & WED 9:00 AM-10:40 AM
Section: 102
OPEN
Notes: contact hours may include a mandatory final event held outside regular class hours. The day/time of the event will be announced early in the term.
Course code: COM 232 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: FASH 261 N Event Planning
Hours: 60
Room: Dante
Dual Listing: BUS 232 F
Description: This course introduces students to special event planning processes and techniques. Emphasis is on creating, organizing, identifying sponsors, marketing, and implementing large-scale community events. We will explore this very detail-oriented field as it deals with vendors, contracts, fundraising, budgeting, ethics, and other aspects. Students will research products, competition, and target markets to determine best possible exposure and success. As part of the course students may organize a real event in interdisciplinary collaboration with other departments.
Event Planning
MON 6:00 PM-7:40 PM & WED 6:00 PM-7:40 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Notes: contact hours may include a mandatory final event held outside regular class hours. The day/time of the event will be announced early in the term.
Course code: COM 232 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: FASH 261 N Event Planning
Hours: 60
Room: Puccini
Dual Listing: BUS 232 F
Description: This course introduces students to special event planning processes and techniques. Emphasis is on learning to create, organize, identify sponsors for, market, and implement different types of events. We will explore this very detail-oriented field as it deals with vendors, contracts, fundraising, budgeting, ethics, and other aspects. Students will research products, competition, and target markets to determine the best possible exposure and success. As part of the course students may organize a real event in interdisciplinary collaboration with other departments.
Event Planning
TUE 6:00 PM-7:40 PM & THU 6:00 PM-7:40 PM
Section: 202
FULL
Notes: contact hours may include a mandatory final event held outside regular class hours. The day/time of the event will be announced early in the term.
Course code: COM 232 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: FASH 261 N Event Planning
Hours: 60
Room: Galileo
Dual Listing: BUS 232 F
Description: This course introduces students to special event planning processes and techniques. Emphasis is on learning to create, organize, identify sponsors for, market, and implement different types of events. We will explore this very detail-oriented field as it deals with vendors, contracts, fundraising, budgeting, ethics, and other aspects. Students will research products, competition, and target markets to determine the best possible exposure and success. As part of the course students may organize a real event in interdisciplinary collaboration with other departments.
Event Planning
MON 9:00 AM-10:40 AM & WED 9:00 AM-10:40 AM
Section: 203
FULL
Notes: contact hours may include a mandatory final event held outside regular class hours. The day/time of the event will be announced early in the term.
Course code: COM 232 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: FASH 261 N Event Planning
Hours: 60
Room: Leonardo
Dual Listing: BUS 232 F
Description: This course introduces students to special event planning processes and techniques. Emphasis is on learning to create, organize, identify sponsors for, market, and implement different types of events. We will explore this very detail-oriented field as it deals with vendors, contracts, fundraising, budgeting, ethics, and other aspects. Students will research products, competition, and target markets to determine the best possible exposure and success. As part of the course students may organize a real event in interdisciplinary collaboration with other departments.
Event Planning
MON to THU 9:00 AM-12:40 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Notes: contact hours may include a mandatory final event held outside regular class hours. The day/time of the event will be announced early in the term.
Course code: COM 232 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: FASH 261 N Event Planning
Hours: 60
Room: Galileo
Dual Listing: BUS 232 F
Description: This course introduces students to special event planning processes and techniques. Emphasis is on learning to create, organize, identify sponsors for, market, and implement different types of events. We will explore this very detail-oriented field as it deals with vendors, contracts, fundraising, budgeting, ethics, and other aspects. Students will research products, competition, and target markets to determine the best possible exposure and success. As part of the course students may organize a real event in interdisciplinary collaboration with other departments.
Event Planning
MON to THU 9:00 AM-12:40 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Notes: contact hours may include a mandatory final event held outside regular class hours. The day/time of the event will be announced early in the term.
Course code: COM 232 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: FASH 261 N : Event Planning
Hours: 60
Room: Marco Polo
Dual Listing: BUS 232 F
Description: This course introduces students to special event planning processes and techniques. Emphasis is on learning to create, organize, identify sponsors for, market, and implement different types of events. We will explore this very detail-oriented field as it deals with vendors, contracts, fundraising, budgeting, ethics, and other aspects. Students will research products, competition, and target markets to determine the best possible exposure and success. As part of the course students may organize a real event in interdisciplinary collaboration with other departments.
Media Ethics
MON 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: COM 245 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: COM 330 L Communication Ethics
Hours: 45
Room: Caravaggio
Description: Today's communications are so complex and the problems they encounter happen so suddenly that we may not have time to consider all of the ethical implications. Journalists, editors, professionals in advertising and public relations are called upon to weigh potential benefits and harm by their actions in covering stories, in revealing facts that might otherwise be kept private, and in respecting conflicting loyalties. They also find themselves confronted by situations in which they must choose between actions that seem equally right or equally wrong. Everyone encounters ethical dilemmas through wartime and peacetime propaganda, the Western world’s information systems, the PR industry, digital convergence and new frontiers for mass communication. The media inevitably shape our image of society whether we are professionals, consumers, or global citizens. This course explores the ethical dimensions of this dynamic.
Media Ethics
MON 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Course code: COM 245 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: COM 330 L Communication Ethics
Hours: 45
Room: Raffaello
Description: Today's communications are so complex and the problems they encounter happen so suddenly that we may not have time to consider all of the ethical implications. Journalists, editors, professionals in advertising and public relations are called upon to weigh up potential benefits and harm by their actions in covering stories, in revealing facts that might otherwise be kept private, and in respecting conflicting loyalties. They also find themselves confronted by situations in which they must choose between actions that seem equally right, or equally wrong. Wartime and peacetime propaganda, the Western world’s information system, the PR industry, digital convergence and new frontiers for mass communication: everyone encounters ethical dilemmas. The goal of this course is to train you to face what you will inevitably face in your professional careers and in your private lives.
Literature and Journalism
MON to THU 1:15 PM-3:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Course code: COM 260 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Marist Code/Title: COM 342 L: Readings in Journalism
Hours: 45
Room: Firenze
Dual Listing: LIT 260 F
Description: This course will examine the principal relationships between literature and journalism in a comparative context, focusing on American and Italian writers. Authors from Poe to Buzzati, from the exponents of American New Journalism (T. Wolfe, N. Mailer, G. Talese, etc.) to postmodern writers (Fallaci and Tabucchi among others), are considered. The course gives particular attention to the reporter as a character, to fiction and non-fiction style, and to ideas and theories of information, news, chronicles, and the art of communication.
Crosscultural Communication in the Workplace
MON 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: COM 271 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: BUS 370 N Crosscultural Communication in the Workplace
Hours: 45
Room: Donatello
Dual Listing: BUS 270 F
Description: People from more than one culture increasingly have to work together, work side by side, or collaborate on international projects, both at home and abroad. How easy is it to step outside our own cultural expectations? This is an intercultural communication course aimed specifically at understanding intercultural interactions in business or in the workplace from both theoretical and practical standpoints. On a practical level, this course will involve the students' active participation in role play exercises and observations, and will help them to predict and manage intercultural misunderstandings both in the workplace and in more informal social settings. Business practices in different countries, in particular Italy and the USA, and individual case studies will be assessed and discussed according to these frameworks.
Crosscultural Communication in the Workplace
MON 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Course code: COM 271 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: BUS 370 N Crosscultural Communication in the Workplace
Hours: 45
Room: Raffaello
Dual Listing: BUS 270 F
Description: People from more than one culture increasingly have to work together, work side by side, or collaborate on international projects, both at home and abroad. How easy is it to step outside our own cultural expectations? This is an intercultural communication course aimed specifically at understanding intercultural interactions in business or in the workplace from both theoretical and practical standpoints. On a practical level, this course will involve the students' active participation in role play exercises and observations, and will help them to predict and manage intercultural misunderstandings both in the workplace and in more informal social settings. Business practices in different countries, in particular Italy and the USA, and individual case studies will be assessed and discussed according to these frameworks.
Visual Culture in Italy Since 1945 (Art, Design, Media)
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Course code: COM 277 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title:
Hours: 45
Room: Caravaggio
Dual Listing: ART 277 F
Description: Does a significant thread link a Vespa scooter, Vittorio De Sica's Neo-Realist movies, Gucci’s bamboo bag, Gio Ponti’s “Superleggera” chair, Giuseppe Cavalli photographs of “trulli” buildings, and Alberto Burri’s “Catrame” canvases? Our working hypothesis is that it is a common visual culture, with elements of national identity, plus uniquely Italian interconnections between fields and disciplines in the creative and productive processes. Students will test this claim by applying a communications-based approach to the whole of Italian visual culture of the period following World War II. We will view works of contemporary art and design as communicators and carriers of cultural messages. This blurs the sometimes artificial distinction between visual arts (sculpture, painting, conceptual art, film, photography) and design (urban planning, architecture; interior, furniture, and industrial design, graphics, and fashion). Students explore selected case studies in which a designer, film director, or artist may have influenced each other or actually interacted. Theory takes a back seat to process and context, but is not ignored. Students learn to “read” a particularly rich, diverse, and complex visual culture – often in the vanguard and the originator of global “icons.” Students also learn concrete ways to innovate by adopting an interdisciplinary approach.
Sports, Culture, and Communication
WED 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing
Course code: COM 282 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: COM 260 L Sport, Culture, and Communication
Hours: 45
Room: Verdi
Description: This course explores the various meanings of sports, how these meanings may be interpreted, and how sports fits into the larger context of society. Students will examine how sports can communicate cultural values, promote health, play an important role in the prevention of chronic diseases and work effectively towards social integration. Particular areas of interest include sports in the context of the following: nationalism and civic pride, health and wellness, social deviance, gender, race, social stratification, sports in higher education, and politics. Students will examine various texts and films that highlight the importance of sports in society. Special emphasis will be given to European and Italian approaches to sports.
Sport, Culture and Communication
WED 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing
Course code: COM 282 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: COM 260 L Sport, Culture, and Communication
Hours: 45
Room: Leonardo
Description: This course explores the various meanings of sport, how these meanings may be interpreted, and how sports fits into the larger context of society. Students will examine how sport can communicate cultural values, promote health, play an important role in prevention of chronic diseases and work effectively for social integration. Particular areas of interest include sport in the context of the following: nationalism and civic pride, health and wellness, social deviance, gender, race, social stratification, scholastic sport and higher education, and politics. Students will examine various texts and films that highlight the importance of sport in society. Special emphasis will be given to European and Italian approach to sports.
Public Relations
WED 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: COM 130 Introduction to Communications, or equivalents
Course code: COM 300 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: COM 370 L Public Relations
Hours: 45
Room: Tiziano
Description: We will study the definitions, functions, and evolution of public relations, including the application of PR theory and ways to plan a PR campaign (planning process, issue analysis, research methods and strategies). The different fields in which public relations practitioners operate will be presented through case studies and exercises: media relations, event management, crisis management, corporate identity, internal/external communications, community relations, international PR and marketing support, and effectiveness evaluation. Finally, future perspectives and new technological opportunities will be taken into account, trying to define new boundaries for a discipline too often underrated or misunderstood.
Public Relations
MON 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: COM 130 Introduction to Communications, or equivalents
Course code: COM 300 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: COM 370 L Public Relations
Hours: 45
Room: Raffaello
Description: We will study the definitions, functions, and evolution of public relations, including the application of PR theory and ways to plan a PR campaign (planning process, issue analysis, research methods and strategies). The different fields in which public relations practitioners operate will be presented through case studies and exercises: media relations, event management, crisis management, corporate identity, internal/external communications, community relations, international PR and marketing support, and effectiveness evaluation. Finally, future perspectives and new technological opportunities will be taken into account, trying to define new boundaries for a discipline too often underrated or misunderstood.
Public Relations
TUE 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
Prerequisites: COM 130 Introduction to Communications, or equivalents
Course code: COM 300 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: COM 370 L Public Relations
Hours: 45
Room: Donatello
Description: We will study the definitions, functions, and evolution of public relations, including the application of PR theory and ways to plan a PR campaign (planning process, issue analysis, research methods and strategies). The different fields in which public relations practitioners operate will be presented through case studies and exercises: media relations, event management, crisis management, corporate identity, internal/external communications, community relations, international PR and marketing support, and effectiveness evaluation. Finally, future perspectives and new technological opportunities will be taken into account, trying to define new boundaries for a discipline too often underrated or misunderstood.
Public Relations
MON to THU 1:15 PM-3:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: COM 130 Introduction to Communications, or equivalents
Course code: COM 300 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: COM 370 L Public Relations
Hours: 45
Room: Caravaggio
Description: We will study the definitions, functions, and evolution of public relations, including the application of PR theory and ways to plan a PR campaign (planning process, issue analysis, research methods and strategies). The different fields in which public relations practitioners operate will be presented through case studies and exercises: media relations, event management, crisis management, corporate identity, internal/external communications, community relations, international PR and marketing support, and effectiveness evaluation. Finally, future perspectives and new technological opportunities will be taken into account, trying to define new boundaries for a discipline too often underrated or misunderstood.
War and Media
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: COM 180 Mass Communication, or HIS 130 Western Civilization, or POL 150 Introduction to Political Science, or equivalents
Course code: COM 301 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: CLDM 311 L War and Media
Hours: 45
Room: Marconi
Dual Listing: POL 301 F
Description: This course analyses the role played by the media in the evolution of national and international wars. We will investigate the extent to which the media either influence decision-making about military interventions or serve as tools in the hands of government officials seeking to influence public opinion. A number of media-related phenomena will be studied including the CNN effect, agenda setting, real time policy, media diplomacy, media war, news management, and propaganda, through the examination of key international conflicts, especially since 1950. Several different topics will be explained to understand the intersection between war and media: the proliferation of satellite technologies and the Internet; the importance of international TV networks such as CNN and al Jazeera; the role of still and moving images; the importance of journalists and journalistic conventions; the relevance of press conferences, briefings, and official statements; the representation of war in movies and artists’ works; the media gap between "North" and "South"; the emergence of "non-Western" media; and also the spread of ethnic conflicts and terrorism, and the increasingly asymmetric nature of war.
War and Media
TUE 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: COM 180 Mass Communication, or HIS 130 Western Civilization, or POL 150 Introduction to Political Science, or equivalents
Course code: COM 301 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: CLDM 311 L War and Media
Hours: 45
Room: Leonardo
Dual Listing: POL 301 F
Description: This course analyses the role played by the media in the evolution of national and international wars. We will investigate the extent to which the media either influence decision-making about military interventions or serve as tools in the hands of government officials seeking to influence public opinion. A number of media-related phenomena will be studied including the CNN effect, agenda setting, real time policy, media diplomacy, media war, news management, and propaganda, through the examination of key international conflicts, especially since 1950. Several different topics will be explained to understand the intersection between war and media: the proliferation of satellite technologies and the Internet; the importance of international TV networks such as CNN and al Jazeera; the role of still and moving images; the importance of journalists and journalistic conventions; the relevance of press conferences, briefings, and official statements; the representation of war in movies and artists’ works; the media gap between "North" and "South"; the emergence of "non-Western" media; and also the spread of ethnic conflicts and terrorism, and the increasingly asymmetric nature of war.
War and Media
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
Prerequisites: COM 180 Mass Communication, or HIS 130 Western Civilization, or POL 150 Introduction to Political Science, or equivalents
Course code: COM 301 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: CLDM 311 L War and Media
Hours: 45
Room: Puccini
Dual Listing: POL 301 F
Description: This course analyses the role played by the media in the evolution of national and international wars. We will investigate the extent to which the media either influence decision-making about military interventions or serve as tools in the hands of government officials seeking to influence public opinion. A number of media-related phenomena will be studied including the CNN effect, agenda setting, real time policy, media diplomacy, media war, news management, and propaganda, through the examination of key international conflicts, especially since 1950. Several different topics will be explained to understand the intersection between war and media: the proliferation of satellite technologies and the Internet; the importance of international TV networks such as CNN and al Jazeera; the role of still and moving images; the importance of journalists and journalistic conventions; the relevance of press conferences, briefings, and official statements; the representation of war in movies and artists’ works; the media gap between "North" and "South"; the emergence of "non-Western" media; and also the spread of ethnic conflicts and terrorism, and the increasingly asymmetric nature of war.
War and Media
MON to THU 4:15 PM-6:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: COM 180 Mass Communication, or HIS 130 Western Civilization, or POL 150 Introduction to Political Science, or equivalents
Course code: COM 301 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: CLDM 311 L War and Media
Hours: 45
Room: Donatello
Dual Listing: POL 301 F
Description: This course analyses the role played by the media in the evolution of national and international wars. We will investigate the extent to which the media either influence decision-making about military interventions or serve as tools in the hands of government officials seeking to influence public opinion. A number of media-related phenomena will be studied including the CNN effect, agenda setting, real time policy, media diplomacy, media war, news management, and propaganda, through the examination of key international conflicts, especially since 1950. Several different topics will be explained to understand the intersection between war and media: the proliferation of satellite technologies and the Internet; the importance of international TV networks such as CNN and al Jazeera; the role of still and moving images; the importance of journalists and journalistic conventions; the relevance of press conferences, briefings, and official statements; the representation of war in movies and artists’ works; the media gap between "North" and "South"; the emergence of "non-Western" media; and also the spread of ethnic conflicts and terrorism, and the increasingly asymmetric nature of war.
War and Media
MON to THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: COM 180 Mass Communication, or HIS 130 Western Civilization, or POL 150 Introduction to Political Science, or equivalent
Course code: COM 301 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: CLDM 311 L War and Media
Hours: 48
Room: Costantino
Dual Listing: POL 301 R
Description: This course analyses the role played by the media in the evolution of national and international wars. We will investigate the extent to which media either influence decision-making about military interventions or serve as tools in the hands of government officials seeking to influence public opinion. A number of media-related phenomena will be studied including the CNN effect, agenda setting, real time policy, media diplomacy, media war, news management, and propaganda, through the examination of key international conflicts, especially since 1950. Several different topics will be explained to understand the intersection between war and media: the proliferation of satellite technologies and the Internet; the importance of international TV networks such as CNN and al Jazeera; the role of still and moving images; the importance of journalists and journalistic routines; the relevance of press conferences, briefings, and official statements; the representation of war in movies and artists’ works; the media gap between "North" and "South"; the emergence of "non-Western" media; and also the spread of ethnic conflicts and terrorism, and the increasingly asymmetric nature of war.
Broadcasting: Italian Culture and Television
WED 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: COM 130 Introduction to Communications, or equivalent
Course code: COM 305 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: CLDM 303 L Broadcasting: Italian Culture and Television
Hours: 45
Room: Fellini
Description: This course examines the development of commercial television broadcasting, its beginnings in radio, and its creation of distinctive genres in Italy. Italian state and private television are analyzed and compared. The course also considers different theoretical approaches to the analysis of television by investigating the various theories of its effects and the impact on other media. The course will examine today's main trends, strategies, and broadcast in Italian television. A strong link is also made between Italian television and Italian culture.
Broadcasting: Italian Culture and Television
WED 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: COM 130 Introduction to Communications, or equivalent
Course code: COM 305 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: CLDM 303 L Broadcasting: Italian Culture and Television
Hours: 45
Room: Fellini
Description: This course examines the development of commercial television broadcasting, its beginnings in radio, and its creation of distinctive genres in Italy. Italian state and private television are analyzed and compared. The course also considers different theoretical approaches to the analysis of television by investigating the various theories of its effects and the impact on other media. The course will examine today's main trends, strategies, and broadcast in Italian television. A strong link is also made between Italian television and Italian culture.
Intercultural Communication
MON 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
FULL
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing
Course code: COM 306 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: COM 325 L Intercultural Communication
Hours: 45
Room: Galileo
Description: The course, which introduces students to the basic patterns of cross-cultural psychology and communication, proposes an analysis of communication behavior in interpersonal and intercultural, individual and group environments. Along with a study of the influence of culture on identity, viewpoints, and communication, it progressively proposes all the theoretical concepts that are necessary to analyze communication in an interpersonal and intercultural context. Topics include: common communication difficulties, communication roles, and proxemics. Special emphasis is placed on rituals, message patterns, clothing, myths, ideologies, and on the influence of the mass media on our cross-cultural representation of reality.
Intercultural Communication
MON 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 102
FULL
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing
Course code: COM 306 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: COM 325 L Intercultural Communication
Hours: 45
Room: Caravaggio
Description: The course, which introduces students to the basic patterns of cross-cultural psychology and communication, proposes an analysis of communication behavior in interpersonal and intercultural, individual and group environments. Along with a study of the influence of culture on identity, viewpoints, and communication, it progressively proposes all the theoretical concepts that are necessary to analyze communication in an interpersonal and intercultural context. Topics include: common communication difficulties, communication roles, and proxemics. Special emphasis is placed on rituals, message patterns, clothing, myths, ideologies, and on the influence of the mass media on our cross-cultural representation of reality.
Intercultural Communication
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing
Course code: COM 306 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: COM 325 L Intercultural Communication
Hours: 45
Room: Donatello
Description: The course, which introduces students to the basic patterns of cross-cultural psychology and communication, proposes an analysis of communication behavior in interpersonal and intercultural, individual and group environments. Along with a study of the influence of culture on identity, viewpoints, and communication, it progressively proposes all the theoretical concepts that are necessary to analyze communication in an interpersonal and intercultural context. Topics include: common communication difficulties, communication roles, and proxemics. Special emphasis is placed on rituals, message patterns, clothing, myths, ideologies, and on the influence of the mass media on our cross-cultural representation of reality.
Intercultural Communication
MON 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 202
FULL
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing
Course code: COM 306 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: COM 325 L Intercultural Communication
Hours: 45
Room: Puccini
Description: The course, which introduces students to the basic patterns of cross-cultural psychology and communication, proposes an analysis of communication behavior in interpersonal and intercultural, individual and group environments. Along with a study of the influence of culture on identity, viewpoints, and communication, it progressively proposes all the theoretical concepts that are necessary to analyze communication in an interpersonal and intercultural context. Topics include: common communication difficulties, communication roles, and proxemics. Special emphasis is placed on rituals, message patterns, clothing, myths, ideologies, and on the influence of the mass media on our cross-cultural representation of reality.
Intercultural Communication
MON 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 203
OPEN
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing
Course code: COM 306 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: COM 325 L Intercultural Communication
Hours: 45
Room: Raffaello
Description: The course, which introduces students to the basic patterns of cross-cultural psychology and communication, proposes an analysis of communication behavior in interpersonal and intercultural, individual and group environments. Along with a study of the influence of culture on identity, viewpoints, and communication, it progressively proposes all the theoretical concepts that are necessary to analyze communication in an interpersonal and intercultural context. Topics include: common communication difficulties, communication roles, and proxemics. Special emphasis is placed on rituals, message patterns, clothing, myths, ideologies, and on the influence of the mass media on our cross-cultural representation of reality.
Intercultural Communication
MON to THU 1:15 PM-3:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing
Course code: COM 306 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: COM 325 L Intercultural Communication
Hours: 45
Room: Donatello
Description: The course, which introduces students to the basic patterns of cross-cultural psychology and communication, proposes an analysis of communication behavior in interpersonal and intercultural, individual and group environments. Along with a study of the influence of culture on identity, viewpoints, and communication, it progressively proposes all the theoretical concepts that are necessary to analyze communication in an interpersonal and intercultural context. Topics include: common communication difficulties, communication roles, and proxemics. Special emphasis is placed on rituals, message patterns, clothing, myths, ideologies, and on the influence of the mass media on our cross-cultural representation of reality.
Intercultural Communication
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing
Course code: COM 306 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: COM 325 L Intercultural Communication
Hours: 45
Room: Marco Aurelio
Description: The course, which introduces students to the basic patterns of cross-cultural psychology and communication, proposes an analysis of communication behavior in interpersonal and intercultural, individual and group environments. Along with a study of the influence of culture on identity, viewpoints, and communication, it progressively proposes all the theoretical concepts that are necessary to analyze communication in an interpersonal and intercultural context. Topics include: common communication difficulties, communication roles, and proxemics. Special emphasis is placed on rituals, message patterns, clothing, myths, ideologies, and on the influence of mass media on our cross-cultural representation of reality.
Intercultural Communication
MON to THU 11:00 AM-1:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing
Course code: COM 306 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: COM 325 L Intercultural Communication
Hours: 45
Room: Tiberio
Description: The course, which introduces students to the basic patterns of cross-cultural psychology and communication, proposes an analysis of communication behavior in interpersonal and intercultural, individual and group environments. Along with a study of the influence of culture on identity, viewpoints, and communication, it progressively proposes all the theoretical concepts that are necessary to analyze communication in an interpersonal and intercultural context. Topics include: common communication difficulties, communication roles, and proxemics. Special emphasis is placed on rituals, message patterns, clothing, myths, ideologies, and on the influence of mass media on our cross-cultural representation of reality.
Intercultural Communication
MON to THU 11:00 AM-1:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing
Course code: COM 306 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title:
Hours: 45
Room: TBA
Description: The course, which introduces students to the basic patterns of cross-cultural psychology and communication, proposes an analysis of communication behavior in interpersonal and intercultural, individual and group environments. Along with a study of the influence of culture on identity, viewpoints, and communication, it progressively proposes all the theoretical concepts that are necessary to analyze communication in an interpersonal and intercultural context. Topics include: common communication difficulties, communication roles, and proxemics. Special emphasis is placed on rituals, message patterns, clothing, myths, ideologies, and on the influence of mass media on our cross-cultural representation of reality.
Integrated Marketing Communication
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents. Recommended: COM 204 Advertising Principles, or equivalent
Course code: COM 313 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: BUS 352 L Integrated Marketing Communications
Hours: 45
Room: Marco Polo
Dual Listing: BUS 313 F
Description: Marketing communication is one of the most exciting and stimulating areas in modern marketing. Its importance has grown dramatically in recent decades. The means through which we communicate all around the world have been affected by the new technological advances. These advances, such as the Internet, have enabled and eased interaction on a global scale. Therefore, marketers are looking for new means of communication that can better gain the attention of customers. This course will examine the theory and techniques applicable today to all the major marketing communication functions: ads, direct marketing, sales promotion, public relations, personal selling, and the Internet. It will allow students to research and evaluate a company’s marketing and promotional situation and use this information to develop effective communication strategies and programs.
Integrated Marketing Communication
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents. Recommended: COM 204 Advertising Principles, or equivalent
Course code: COM 313 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: BUS 352 L Integrated Marketing Communications
Hours: 45
Room: Galileo
Dual Listing: BUS 313 F
Description: Marketing communication is one of the most exciting and stimulating areas in modern marketing. Its importance has grown dramatically in recent decades. The means through which we communicate all around the world have been affected by the new technological advances. These advances, such as the Internet, have enabled and eased interaction on a global scale. Therefore, marketers are looking for new means of communication that can better gain the attention of customers. This course will examine the theory and techniques applicable today to all the major marketing communication functions: ads, direct marketing, sales promotion, public relations, personal selling, and the Internet. It will allow students to research and evaluate a company’s marketing and promotional situation and use this information to develop effective communication strategies and programs.
Integrated Marketing Communication
WED 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 202
FULL
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or BUS 195 Foundations of Management, or equivalents. Recommended: COM 204 Advertising Principles, or equivalent
Course code: COM 313 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: BUS 352 L Integrated Marketing Communications
Hours: 45
Room: Galileo
Dual Listing: BUS 313 F
Description: Marketing communication is one of the most exciting and stimulating areas in modern marketing. Its importance has grown dramatically in recent decades. The means through which we communicate all around the world have been affected by the new technological advances. These advances, such as the Internet, have enabled and eased interaction on a global scale. Therefore, marketers are looking for new means of communication that can better gain the attention of customers. This course will examine the theory and techniques applicable today to all the major marketing communication functions: ads, direct marketing, sales promotion, public relations, personal selling, and the Internet. It will allow students to research and evaluate a company’s marketing and promotional situation and use this information to develop effective communication strategies and programs.
Crowdfunding
MON 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or BUS 130 Introduction to Business, or COM 204 Advertising Principles, or equivalents, or Information majors of junior standing
Course code: COM 314 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: CLDM 314 L Crowdfunding
Hours: 45
Room: Dante
Dual Listing: BUS 314 F
Description: The purpose of the course is to provide students with a sound holistic view of crowdfunding: what it is, what its purpose is, how to take advantage of it or utilize it for projects or businesses, the essential key tips to plan, structure and run a successful campaign, and how to interact and make a campaign even more successful. The course will explain the crowdfunding process and the types of crowdfunding available, and it will focus on examining how the crowdfunding movement has changed the way in which startups and entrepreneurs can get their work to the public. Students will learn the characteristics of successful versus unsuccessful crowdfunding campaigns, and will also be able to analyze which crowdfunding platforms suit specific projects. Students will also examine the role of culture and context, by observing how and why different countries respond and participate in different ways in the crowdfunding phenomenon. At the end of the course, students will feel comfortable and confident with the concept of crowdfunding and will possess the necessary “know how” to develop an effective crowdfunding campaign strategy.
Social Media Marketing
MON to THU 1:15 PM-3:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or equivalent
Course code: COM 316 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: COM 388 L Special Topics
Hours: 45
Room: Leonardo
Dual Listing: BUS 316 F
Description: This course covers the planning and integration of social media into marketing plans and it will explain how to build winning strategies and how to track their effectiveness. This includes learning about fundamental marketing concepts that are relevant to the digital world and acquiring new skills for creating and implementing successful marketing campaigns, online strategies and operations pursued through new media. Students will be introduced to the most popular social media platforms and will learn about the differences between specific media tools and the different purposes of operations pursued through each of them and their proper use to expand business and engage with online customers. In this course, students will be able to build effective digital tactics and gain skills to become social media managers.
Social Media Marketing
MON to THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: BUS 210 Principles of Marketing, or equivalent
Course code: COM 316 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: COM 388 L: Special Topics
Hours: 45
Room: Costantino
Dual Listing: BUS 316 R
Description: This course covers the planning and integration of social media into marketing plans and it will explain how to build winning strategies and how to track their effectiveness. This includes learning about fundamental marketing concepts that are relevant to the digital world and acquiring new skills for creating and implementing successful marketing campaigns, online strategies and operations pursued through new media. Students will be introduced to the most popular social media platforms and will learn about the differences between specific media tools and the different purposes of operations pursued through each of them and their proper use to expand business and engage with online customers. In this course, students will be able to build effective digital tactics and gain skills to become social media managers.
Global Sports Marketing
TUE 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Course code: COM 352 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: COM 352 L Global Sports Marketing
Hours: 45
Room: Raffaello
Description: This course will cover the practice of sports marketing in the increasingly globalized athletic economy. Students will begin by discussing the global sports economy and the creation of international sports brands. Students will study the different aspects of sports marketing, from sponsorships to event planning to understanding publics and publicity, all within the complex nature of international sporting events and audiences. Students will examine the difference in marketing practices across nations and cultures and study the challenges of marketing international sporting events to varied audiences. Students will also look at the impact of globalization on the needs of corporate sponsorships, as well as the impact of global sporting events on local and international communities. Students will examine case studies of various global sporting events to better understand best practices. By the end of the class, students will create a strategic marketing plan for an international sporting event.
Global Sports Marketing
MON to THU 1:15 PM-3:45 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Course code: COM 352 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: COM 352 L Global Sports Marketing
Hours: 45
Room: Marconi
Description: This course will cover the practice of sports marketing in the increasingly globalized athletic economy. Students will begin by discussing the global sports economy and the creation of international sports brands. Students will study the different aspects of sports marketing, from sponsorships to event planning to understanding public relations and publicity, all within the complex nature of international sporting events and audiences. Students will examine the differences in marketing practices across nations and cultures and study the challenges of marketing international sporting events to varied audiences. Students will also look at the impact of globalization on the needs for corporate sponsorships, as well as the impact of global sporting events on local and international communities. Students will examine case studies of various global sporting events to better understand best practices. By the end of the class, students will create a strategic marketing plan for an international sporting event.
Global Sports Marketing
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Course code: COM 352 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: COM 352 L Global Sports Marketing
Hours: 48
Room: TBA
Description: This course will cover the practice of sports marketing in the increasingly globalized athletic economy. Students will begin by discussing the global sports economy and the creation of international sports brands. Students will study the different aspects of sports marketing, from sponsorships to event planning to understanding public relations and publicity, all within the complex nature of international sporting events and audiences. Students will examine the differences in marketing practices across nations and cultures and study the challenges of marketing international sporting events to varied audiences. Students will also look at the impact of globalization on the needs of corporate sponsorships, as well as the impact of global sporting events on local and international communities. Students will examine case studies of various global sporting events to better understand best practices. By the end of the class, students will create a strategic marketing plan for an international sporting event.
Sport in Global Cinema and Television
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
OPEN
Course code: COM 353 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: COM 353 L Sports in Global Cinema & Television
Hours: 45
Room: Fellini
Description: This course will examine portrayals of sport in various forms in movies and television programs from different nations and cultures. Students will begin by examining the history of sport in film and television. Students will look at the techniques and narratives used to portray sport, noting various themes, ideas, and stylistic choices that are commonplace in the creation of the sport narrative in these mediums. Students will look at the way in which sport speaks to and exists within the society in which the film was produced, with a particular focus on similarities and differences amongst different countries and societies. The course will also examine the way in which the “other” is portrayed in sport films and programs, again looking for how this varies across the globe. Primary discussion topics include race, gender, class, national identity, and various social issues built into the sports narrative. Films and television programs will include fiction, non-fiction, as well as documentary projects focused on sport. Throughout the course, students will present papers and presentations on assigned films and readings.
Global Media Strategies
MON 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: 1) COM 313 Integrated Marketing Communication or COM 204 Advertising Principles; 2) COM 300 Public Relations, or equivalents
Course code: COM 360 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: COM 364 L Global Media Strategies
Hours: 45
Room: Marconi
Description: This course will focus on using traditional and new media to develop successful media strategies for all stages of the customer relationship cycle. Students explore media usage habits—what media consumers are using and how they use it – to provide guidance on the best ways to reach and dialogue with new and existing customers. Students learn techniques for developing, measuring and improving multi-touch communications strategies for acquiring new customers, retaining existing customers, encouraging repeat purchases and building long-term, profitable relationships.
Communications Internship
-
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: 1) English/Writing/Journalism majors of junior standing; 2) Concurrent enrollment in a course in the same field. Exceptional written English required. Recommended: Strong writing and communication skills. Fluency in Italian may be advantageous, but is not required
Notes: min. 135 hrs INTERNSHIP. Placement opportunities are limited. Admission contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, formal letter of intent, writing sample (due by application deadline) and onsite interview. Public transport costs may apply. Student taking an internship must retain full-time status, with a minimum of 15 credits per semester.
Course code: COM 362 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: TBA
Marist Code/Title: COM 363 N International Communication Internship "Grade Pass/Fail"
Hours: 135
Room: External
Description: This internship provides practical and professional experience in the field of Communications. The intern is monitored by both the onsite supervisor and an LdM faculty member. The grade assigned by the faculty internship supervisor reflects the assessment of weekly reports, two papers, and an overall evaluation. Ten/twelve hours weekly at the internship site; student internship schedules and onsite duties may vary. The placement is with a Communications agency. Interns develop and carry out various activities which may include, but are not limited to: writing new articles; updating and adapting preexisting articles for different media formats; database entry; contributing to blogs, social media, Web sites; developing new projects. Note: Placement opportunities are limited and subject to change. Admission is contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, a formal letter of intent, a writing sample. Students who enroll must submit supporting documentation by the application deadline, and acceptance is conditional upon the result of an onsite interview during the first week of the term.
Communications / Event Planning Internship
-
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: 1) Communications / PR / Marketing / Event Planning majors of junior standing with at least 2-3 prior courses in the field; 2) Concurrent enrollment in a course in the same field. Fluency in Italian may be advantageous, but is not required
Notes: min. 135 hrs INTERNSHIP. Placement opportunities are limited. Admission contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, formal letter of intent, writing sample (due by application deadline) and onsite interview. Student taking an internship must retain full-time status, with a minimum of 15 credits per semester.
Course code: COM 367 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: TBA
Marist Code/Title: CLDM 367 L Communication/Event Planning Internship
Hours: 135
Room: External
Description: This internship provides practical and professional experience in the field of Communication and Event Planning. The intern is monitored by both the onsite supervisor and an LdM faculty member. The grade assigned by the faculty internship supervisor reflects the assessment of weekly reports, two papers, and an overall evaluation. Ten/twelve hours weekly at the internship site; student internship schedules and onsite duties may vary. The placement is at an Event Management company. Interns develop and carry out various activities which may include, but are not limited to: conceptualizing and organizing commercial and non-profit events independently or as part of a team, writing event proposals, assisting in logistics, communication, marketing and fundraising; working on social media campaigns, assisting in clerical and administrative tasks. Note: Placement opportunities are limited and subject to change. Admission is contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, a formal letter of intent, a writing sample. Students who enroll must submit supporting documentation by the application deadline, and acceptance is conditional upon the result of an onsite interview during the first week of the term.
Social Media Marketing Internship
-
Section: 101
FULL
Prerequisites: 1) Marketing / Communications majors of junior standing with at least 2-3 prior courses in the field; 2) Concurrent enrollment in a course in the same field. Recommended: Social networking experience and strong photography skills. Fluency in Italian may be advantageous, but is not required
Notes: min. 135 hrs INTERNSHIP. Placement opportunities are limited. Admission contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, formal letter of intent, samples of writing and marketing work (due by application deadline) and onsite interview. Student taking an internship must retain full-time status, with a minimum of 15 credits per semester.
Course code: COM 370 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via Faenza, 43
Marist Code/Title: COM 388 L ST: Social Media Marketing
Hours: 135
Room: Marketing Office
Dual Listing: BUS 369 F
Description: This internship provides practical and professional experience in the field of Social Media Marketing. The intern is monitored by both the on-site supervisor and an LdM faculty member. The grade assigned by the faculty internship supervisor reflects the assessment of weekly reports, two papers, and an overall evaluation. Ten/twelve hours weekly at the internship site; student internship schedules and on site duties may vary. The placement is with the LdM Social Media Office or with advertising or communication agencies. Interns develop and carry out various activities, which may include, but are not limited to: market research based on social media; marketing strategy focused on promotional strategy and advertisement strategy; developing and managing photo archives, the LdM alumni network – which establishes online communication tools for alumni; managing the online database. Note: Placement opportunities are limited and subject to change. Admission is contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, a formal letter of intent, and samples of writing and marketing work (i.e., blog writing, social media campaign example, press release, advertising project, photos). Students who enroll must submit supporting documentation by the application deadline, and acceptance is conditional upon the result of an on-site interview during the first week of the term.
Social Media Marketing Internship
-
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: 1) Marketing / Communications majors of junior standing with at least 2-3 prior courses in the field; 2) Concurrent enrollment in a course in the same field. Recommended: Social networking experience and strong photography skills. Fluency in Italian may be advantageous, but is not required
Notes: min. 135 hrs INTERNSHIP. Placement opportunities are limited. Admission contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, formal letter of intent, samples of writing and marketing work (due by application deadline) and onsite interview. Student taking an internship must retain full-time status, with a minimum of 15 credits per semester.
Course code: COM 370 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: TBA
Marist Code/Title:
Hours: 135
Room: External
Dual Listing: BUS 369 F
Description: This internship provides practical and professional experience in the field of Social Media Marketing. The intern is monitored by both the on-site supervisor and an LdM faculty member. The grade assigned by the faculty internship supervisor reflects the assessment of weekly reports, two papers, and an overall evaluation. Ten/twelve hours weekly at the internship site; student internship schedules and on site duties may vary. The placement is with the LdM Social Media Office or with advertising or communication agencies. Interns develop and carry out various activities, which may include, but are not limited to: market research based on social media; marketing strategy focused on promotional strategy and advertisement strategy; developing and managing photo archives, the LdM alumni network – which establishes online communication tools for alumni; managing the online database. Note: Placement opportunities are limited and subject to change. Admission is contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, a formal letter of intent, and samples of writing and marketing work (i.e., blog writing, social media campaign example, press release, advertising project, photos). Students who enroll must submit supporting documentation by the application deadline, and acceptance is conditional upon the result of an on-site interview during the first week of the term.
Global Brand Management
MON 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: 1) COM 313 Integrated Marketing Communication or COM 204 Advertising Principles; 2) COM 300 Public Relations, or equivalents
Course code: COM 411 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: COM 427 L Global Brand Mgmt
Hours: 45
Room: Dante
Description: This course is designed to provide an in-depth study into the major components involved in developing successful global brands. In this course, students will develop and apply research-based strategic planning to the development of new or existing global brands. This process involves examining the principles of consumer and shopper behavior and exploring the impact of current consumer and global trends on new and existing brands. Students will use primary and secondary consumer research to further develop a new or existing global brand. To conclude the class, students will develop integrated communications campaigns designed to launch the brand, acquire customers and develop long-term, profitable relationships in multiple global markets.
Global Brand Management
MON 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: 1) COM 313 Integrated Marketing Communication or COM 204 Advertising Principles; 2) COM 300 Public Relations, or equivalents
Course code: COM 411 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: COM 427 L Global Brand Mgmt
Hours: 45
Room: Marconi
Description: This course is designed to provide an in-depth study into the major components involved in developing successful global brands. In this course, students will develop and apply research-based strategic planning to the development of new or existing global brands. This process involves examining the principles of consumer and shopper behavior and exploring the impact of current consumer and global trends on new and existing brands. Students will use primary and secondary consumer research to further develop a new or existing global brand. To conclude the class, students will develop integrated communications campaigns designed to launch the brand, acquire customers and develop long-term, profitable relationships in multiple global markets.
Consumer Insights and Strategic Development
TUE 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: 1) COM 313 Integrated Marketing Communication or COM 204 Advertising Principles; 2) COM 300 Public Relations, or equivalents
Course code: COM 421 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: COM 428 L Consu Ins/Devl
Hours: 45
Room: Tiziano
Description: Consumer behavior is defined as the behavior that consumers, groups or organizations display in searching for, purchasing, using, evaluating and disposing of products and services that they expect will satisfy their needs. Consumer Insights teach students the psychology of how consumers think, feel, reason, and select between different alternatives (e.g., brands, products, and retailers), and how consumers are influenced by their environment (e.g., culture, family, peers, media). In this course, students will learn to uncover and utilize relevant global and regional consumer insights to develop effective integrated marketing communication strategies. Blending the theory and practice of consumer behavior within a global context, students will delve beyond the consumer’s functional needs to understand the deeper needs, wants and motivations that drive consumer behavior. They will also understand that consumer behavior differs depending on the consumer’s cultural and socio-economic background.
Global IMC Campaign Development
THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: 1) BUS 312 International Marketing; 2) COM 411 Global Brand Management or COM 360 Global Media Strategies, or equivalents
Course code: COM 441 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: COM 429 L Global Mkt Camp Devl
Hours: 45
Room: Caravaggio
Description: This course requires student to utilize the skills and knowledge they have acquired in their previous Global IMC courses to develop an insight driven, multi-media, IMC campaign. This will include conducting primary and secondary research to determine and analyze the ideal target audience and uncover the key customer insight. It also involves creating a big campaign idea and multi-media integrated strategy based on the customer insight. Lastly, students will develop a measurable media strategy and all the creative elements for the campaign.
Capping: Communications Studies
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: Communications Studies majors of senior standing
Course code: COM 461 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Communications
Credits: 3
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Marist Code/Title: COM 401 L Capping
Hours: 45
Room: Firenze
Description: A capping course required of all Senior Communication Majors. The capping course brings coherence to a student’s experience in the major by creating connections among the various sub-fields in which students have specialized, and it reinforces connections between the communication major, the student’s cognate, and the student’s experience in the Core.
Introduction to Multicultural Education
TUE 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Prerequisites: an introductory course in Education, or equivalent
Course code: EDU 350 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Education
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title:
Hours: 45
Room: Caravaggio
Description: Provides students with an understanding of the concepts, theories and strategies that constitute the five major dimensions of multicultural education as defined by James A. Banks: equity pedagogy; content integration; knowledge construction process; prejudice reduction; empowerment in school culture and social structure. We will explore these dimensions within the context of the host culture of Italy and analyze these forms of knowledge in terms of cultural differences, inclusions, and exclusions. Students will reflect on and describe how multicultural education connects with their experiences in the communities and in the schools in Italy. Because prior knowledge and cultural experiences shape our beliefs and values, students need to critically analyze their notions of race, culture, and ethnicity. Through immersion and first-hand experiences we will explore and inquire into how culture and different cultural contexts influence one's beliefs and behavior.
Introduction to Multicultural Education
TUE 6:00 PM-8:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: an introductory course in Education, or equivalent
Course code: EDU 350 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Education
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: EDUC 392 / SOC 392 L Special Topics in Education / Special Topics in Sociology
Hours: 45
Room: Machiavelli
Description: Provides students with an understanding of the concepts, theories and strategies that constitute the five major dimensions of multicultural education as defined by James A. Banks: equity pedagogy; content integration; knowledge construction process; prejudice reduction; empowerment in school culture and social structure. We will explore these dimensions within the context of the host culture of Italy and analyze these forms of knowledge in terms of cultural differences, inclusions, and exclusions. Students will reflect on and describe how multicultural education connects with their experiences in the communities and in the schools in Italy. Because prior knowledge and cultural experiences shape our beliefs and values, students need to critically analyze their notions of race, culture, and ethnicity. Through immersion and first-hand experiences we will explore and inquire into how culture and different cultural contexts influence one's beliefs and behavior.
Introduction to Multicultural Education
MON to THU 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 301
OPEN
Prerequisites: an introductory course in Education, or equivalent
Course code: EDU 350 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Education
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: EDUC 393 L Diversity in Public Education
Hours: 45
Room: Donatello
Description: Provides students with an understanding of the concepts, theories and strategies that constitute the five major dimensions of multicultural education as defined by James A. Banks: equity pedagogy; content integration; knowledge construction process; prejudice reduction; empowerment in school culture and social structure. We will explore these dimensions within the context of the host culture of Italy and analyze these forms of knowledge in terms of cultural differences, inclusions, and exclusions. Students will reflect on and describe how multicultural education connects with their experiences in the communities and in the schools in Italy. Because prior knowledge and cultural experiences shape our beliefs and values, students need to critically analyze their notions of race, culture, and ethnicity. Through immersion and first-hand experiences we will explore and inquire into how culture and different cultural contexts influence one's beliefs and behavior.
Education Internship
-
Section: 201
FULL
Prerequisites: 1) Education or Child/Adolescent Psychology majors of junior standing; 2) Concurrent enrollment in a course in the same or related field. Fluency in Italian may be advantageous, but is not required
Notes: min. 135 hrs INTERNSHIP. Placement opportunities are limited. Admission contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, formal letter of intent (due by application deadline) and on-site interview. Student taking an internship must retain full-time status, with a minimum of 15 credits per semester. Public transport costs apply.
Course code: EDU 361 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Education
Credits: 3
Premises: TBA
Marist Code/Title: EDU 361 L Education Internship
Hours: 135
Room: External
Description: This internship provides practical and professional experience in the field of Education, for the pre-school, kindergarten, primary, or secondary levels. The intern is monitored by both the onsite supervisor and an LdM faculty member. The grade assigned by the faculty internship supervisor reflects the assessment of weekly reports, two papers, and an overall evaluation. Ten/twelve hours weekly at the internship site; student internship schedules and onsite duties may vary. The placement is with a private school. Interns develop and carry out various activities which may include, but are not limited to: Teaching the English language to children and adolescents aged 3 to 18, organizing didactic plans and activities for children aged 18 months to 3 years. Note: Placement opportunities are limited and subject to change. Admission is contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, a formal letter of intent. Students who enroll must submit supporting documentation by the application deadline, and acceptance is conditional upon the result of an onsite interview during the first week of the term.
Education Internship
-
Section: 201
OPEN
Prerequisites: 1) Education or Child/Adolescent Psychology majors of junior standing; 2) Concurrent enrollment in a course in the same or related field. Fluency in Italian may be advantageous, but is not required
Notes: min. 135 hrs INTERNSHIP. Placement opportunities are limited. Admission contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, formal letter of intent (due by application deadline) and on-site interview. Student taking an internship must retain full-time status, with a minimum of 15 credits per semester. Public transport costs apply.
Course code: EDU 361 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Education
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: EDU 361 N Education Internship
Hours: 135
Room: External
Description: This internship provides practical and professional experience in the field of Education, for the pre-school, kindergarten, primary, or secondary levels. The intern is monitored by both the onsite supervisor and an LdM faculty member. The grade assigned by the faculty internship supervisor reflects the assessment of weekly reports, two papers, and an overall evaluation. Ten/twelve hours weekly at the internship site; student internship schedules and onsite duties may vary. The placement is with a private school. Interns develop and carry out various activities which may include, but are not limited to: Teaching the English language to children and adolescents aged 3 to 18, organizing didactic plans and activities for children aged 18 months to 3 years. Note: Placement opportunities are limited and subject to change. Admission is contingent on the student's CV, two reference letters, a formal letter of intent. Students who enroll must submit supporting documentation by the application deadline, and acceptance is conditional upon the result of an onsite interview during the first week of the term.
Engineering Economy
MON,TUE,THU 12:00 NOON-2:05 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Notes: 6-week course, from June 3 to July 11. This course is for science majors only; min. 3.0 cumulative GPA required. Specific STEM attendance and grading policies apply
Course code: EGR 255 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Engineering
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title:
Hours: 45
Room: Traiano
Description: This course teaches methods of economic evaluation of engineering projects and alternatives. Topics include time value of money, decision-making methods, break-even and sensitivity analysis, capital budgeting, replacement analysis, depreciation, taxes and public work analysis. Note: Specific STEM attendance and grading policies apply
Introduction to Environmental Issues
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: ENV 180 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Geography and Environmental Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Via de' Pucci, 4
Marist Code/Title: ENSC 101 L Introduction to Environmental Issues
Hours: 45
Room: Tiziano
Description: Introduction to ecological concepts that provide a foundation for understanding present and future critical environmental issues such as population growth, natural resource management, biodiversity and global changes, wilderness, food production, and changing habitats. Emphasis is placed on situating global environmental issues within an earth-systems science framework, including climate change, pollution, land and coastal degradation, water resources, and habitat loss.
Introduction to Environmental Issues
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
FULL
Course code: ENV 180 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Geography and Environmental Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: ENSC 101 L Introduction to Environmental Issues
Hours: 45
Room: Donatello
Description: Introduction to ecological concepts that provide a foundation for understanding present and future critical environmental issues such as population growth, natural resource management, biodiversity and global changes, wilderness, food production, and changing habitats. Emphasis is placed on situating global environmental issues within an earth-systems science framework including climate change, pollution, land and coastal degradation, water resources, and habitat loss.
Introduction to Environmental Issues
WED 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: ENV 180 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Geography and Environmental Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: ENSC 101 L Introduction to Environmental Issues
Hours: 45
Room: Augusto
Description: Introduction to ecological concepts that provide a foundation for understanding present and future critical environmental issues such as population growth, natural resource management, biodiversity and global changes, wilderness, food production, and changing habitats. Emphasis is placed on situating global environmental issues within an earth-systems science framework, including climate change, pollution, land and coastal degradation, water resources, and habitat loss.
Introduction to Environmental Issues
WED 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Course code: ENV 180 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Geography and Environmental Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: ENSC 101 L Introduction to Environmental Issues
Hours: 45
Room: Tito
Description: Introduction to ecological concepts that provide a foundation for understanding present and future critical environmental issues such as population growth, natural resource management, biodiversity and global changes, wilderness, food production, and changing habitats. Emphasis is placed on situating global environmental issues within an earth-systems science framework, including climate change, pollution, land and coastal degradation, water resources, and habitat loss.
Sustainable Forest Management
THU 5:00 PM-7:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Course code: ENV 190 T
Campus: Tuscania
Department: Geography and Environmental Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Largo della Rocca 7
Marist Code/Title: ENSC 290 L Sustainable Forest Management
Hours: 45
Room: Tymicha
Dual Listing: AGR 190 T
Description: Forests are a unique feature of our planet: a symbol of life, a necessary part of our environment, economy, culture, and traditions. Forests provide us with food, water, renewable energy and shelter, as well as a wide range of other products and intangible benefits. They are home to many species of plants and animals, help mitigate climate change, protect the soil, evoke emotions, and offer places for recreation and inspiration. Forest protect us and keep us alive – but forests need to be protected, too. This is especially true for temperate forests, such as those in Europe and North America, since they have been influenced by human settlements and activities over many centuries. The protection of forests, a key part of modern forestry science, is central to this course. The basics of forestry including tree biology and the ecology of forests, are covered. Additional topics include how to identify trees, harvesting forests, and forest protection. Appropriate field trips and practical activities will help students understand how a forest works and how we can manage it in a sustainable and effective way.
Italian Food through Culture, Environment, and Sustainability
MON 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: ENV 224 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Geography and Environmental Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: CSIT 124L Italian food through Culture, Environment & Sustainability
Hours: 45
Room: Marco Aurelio
Dual Listing: NUH 224 R
Description: The course provides an in-depth study of the intrinsic relationships between food, culture, and environment in Italy. The focus is on the finest Italian products, classic Italian recipes, traditions, and eating habits in terms of their cultural-historical significance and evolution over time, from the northern to the southern regions of Italy. Particular emphasis is given to the environmental conditions (such as microclimate and composition of soil) of each geographical origin along with the production process of the foods, which confer uniqueness of flavor and nutritional value. Finally, the history and traditions of “Romanesca” cuisine and the food biodiversity of the Latium region (Lazio) are explored; through field trips students will experience the cuisine as well as its cultural context.
Italian Food through Culture, Environment, and Sustainability
THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Course code: ENV 224 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Geography and Environmental Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: CSIT 124 L Italian Food through Culture, Environment & Sustainability
Hours: 45
Room: Augusto
Dual Listing: NUH 224 R
Description: The course provides an in-depth study of the intrinsic relationships between food, culture, and environment in Italy. The focus is on the finest Italian products, classic Italian recipes, traditions, and eating habits in terms of their cultural-historical significance and evolution over time, from the northern to the southern regions of Italy. Particular emphasis is given to the environmental conditions (such as microclimate and composition of soil) of each geographical origin along with the production process of the foods, which confer uniqueness of flavor and nutritional value. Finally, the history and traditions of “Romanesca” cuisine and the food biodiversity of the Latium region (Lazio) are explored; through field trips students will experience the cuisine as well as its cultural context.
Italian Food through Culture, Environment, and Sustainability
MON to THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Course code: ENV 224 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Geography and Environmental Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: CSIT 124L Italian food through Culture, Environment & Sustainability
Hours: 45
Room: Marco Aurelio
Dual Listing: NUH 224 R
Description: The course provides an in-depth study of the intrinsic relationships between food, culture, and environment in Italy. The focus is on the finest Italian products, classic Italian recipes, traditions, and eating habits in terms of their cultural-historical significance and evolution over time, from the northern to the southern regions of Italy. Particular emphasis is given to the environmental conditions (such as microclimate and composition of soil) of each geographical origin along with the production process of the foods, which confer uniqueness of flavor and nutritional value. Finally, the history and traditions of “Romanesca” cuisine and the food biodiversity of the Latium region (Lazio) are explored; through field trips students will experience the cuisine as well as its cultural context.
Italian Food through Culture, Environment, and Sustainability
MON to THU 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Course code: ENV 224 R
Campus: Rome
Department: Geography and Environmental Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Via XX Settembre, 4
Marist Code/Title: CSIT 124 L: Italian food through Culture, Environment & Sustainability
Hours: 45
Room: Marco Aurelio
Dual Listing: NUH 224 R
Description: The course provides an in-depth study of the intrinsic relationships between food, culture, and environment in Italy. The focus is on the finest Italian products, classic Italian recipes, traditions, and eating habits in terms of their cultural-historical significance and evolution over time, from the northern to the southern regions of Italy. Particular emphasis is given to the environmental conditions (such as microclimate and composition of soil) of each geographical origin along with the production process of the foods, which confer uniqueness of flavor and nutritional value. Finally, the history and traditions of “Romanesca” cuisine and the food biodiversity of the Latium region (Lazio) are explored; through field trips students will experience the cuisine as well as its cultural context.
Sustainable Food
MON 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: ENV 280 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Geography and Environmental Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Via Faenza, 69/R
Marist Code/Title: ENSC 250 L Eco-Gastronomy: Sustainable Food
Hours: 45
Room: Firenze
Dual Listing: NUH 280 F
Description: This course explores food and gastronomy in the light of environmental preservation, sustainable agricultural practices, the conservation of biological and culinary diversity, and global justice. Drawing on a multi-disciplinary perspective which brings together academic research and the traditional knowledge of farmers and producers, students will explore the complexity of food and food systems through an analysis of their nutritional, social, and environmental aspects. They will be encouraged to reflect on the sustainable food movement in a holistic manner, and to question the roles of individuals and consumers in today's global food system.
Sustainable Food
MON 9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Section: 201
OPEN
Course code: ENV 280 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Geography and Environmental Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Piazza Strozzi, 2
Marist Code/Title: ENSC 250 L Eco-Gastronomy: Sustainable Food
Hours: 45
Room: Donatello
Dual Listing: NUH 280 F
Description: This course explores food and gastronomy in the light of environmental preservation, sustainable agricultural practices, the conservation of biological and culinary diversity and global justice. Drawing on a multi-disciplinary perspective which brings together academic research and the traditional knowledge of farmers and producers, students will explore the complexity of food and food systems through an analysis of their nutritional, social, and environmental aspects. They will be encouraged to reflect on the sustainable food movement in a holistic manner, and to question the roles of individuals and consumers in today's global food system.
Sustainable Food
WED 11:00 AM-1:30 PM
Section: 201
OPEN
Notes: lecture only, no hands-on cooking component
Course code: ENV 280 T
Campus: Tuscania
Department: Geography and Environmental Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Largo della Rocca 7
Marist Code/Title: ENSC 250 L Eco-Gastronomy: Sustainable Food
Hours: 45
Room: Beatrice
Dual Listing: NUH 280 T
Description: This course explores food and gastronomy in the light of environmental preservation, sustainable agricultural practices, the conservation of biological and culinary diversity and global justice. Drawing on a multi-disciplinary perspective which brings together academic research and the traditional knowledge of farmers and producers, students will explore the complexity of food and food systems through an analysis of their nutritional, social, and environmental aspects. They will be encouraged to reflect on the sustainable food movement in a holistic manner, and to question the roles of individuals and consumers in today's global food system.
Sustainable Food
MON to THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Notes: lecture only, no hands-on cooking component
Course code: ENV 280 T
Campus: Tuscania
Department: Geography and Environmental Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Largo della Rocca 7
Marist Code/Title: ENSC 250 L Eco-Gastronomy: Sustainable Food
Hours: 45
Room: Beatrice
Dual Listing: NUH 280 T
Description: This course explores food and gastronomy in the light of environmental preservation, sustainable agricultural practices, the conservation of biological and culinary diversity and global justice. Drawing on a multi-disciplinary perspective which brings together academic research and the traditional knowledge of farmers and producers, students will explore the complexity of food and food systems through an analysis of their nutritional, social, and environmental aspects. They will be encouraged to reflect on the sustainable food movement in a holistic manner, and to question the roles of individuals and consumers in today's global food system.
Sustainable Food
MON to THU 3:00 PM-5:30 PM
Section: 301
OPEN
Notes: lecture only, no hands-on cooking component
Course code: ENV 280 T
Campus: Tuscania
Department: Geography and Environmental Studies
Credits: 3
Premises: Largo della Rocca 7
Marist Code/Title: ENSC 250 L Eco-Gastronomy: Sustainable Food
Hours: 45
Room: Beatrice
Dual Listing: NUH 280 T
Description: This course explores food and gastronomy in the light of environmental preservation, sustainable agricultural practices, the conservation of biological and culinary diversity and global justice. Drawing on a multi-disciplinary perspective which brings together academic research and the traditional knowledge of farmers and producers, students will explore the complexity of food and food systems through an analysis of their nutritional, social, and environmental aspects. They will be encouraged to reflect on the sustainable food movement in a holistic manner, and to question the roles of individuals and consumers in today's global food system.
Introduction to the Fashion Industry
MON 12:00 NOON-2:30 PM
Section: 101
OPEN
Course code: FAS 100 F
Campus: Florence
Department: Fashion Design, Marketing and Merchandising